Try On Some Classics

Harris co library

(Image from the Harris County Public Library Facebook page 8/26/14)

I love to read and it is a good thing because I spend hours reading all the excellent writing found here on WordPress.  At night before bed, I spend another hour or so reading again.  I used to watch television and then found I could not get to sleep.  For me, reading in bed with my husband beside me is the best part of the day.  The dogs are in their kennels sleeping.  The house is quiet.  It is peaceful!

Currently, I am working my way through the classics of Charles Dickens.  Here is a great list of all of Dickens works and the years they were published.  I love his particular style of writing.  Descriptions are Dickens’ expertise, and no matter how he describes it, I am instantly transported back in time to Victorian England.

Presently, I am reading David Copperfield.  I have a Kindle and am enjoying all the free classics that are available, as well they should be.  We should always have excellent literature available to us.  For those of you that blog for free, just as I myself do, remember that writing a book and making lots of money is not always the aim of all writers.  I just want people to read my writing and be touched by what I have written.  My writing will lead me to whatever destiny is out there for me.

Last night, in David Copperfield, I had the pleasure of meeting the character, Uriah Heep!

Not the rock group Uriah Heep, but the one in Dickens’ imagination.  Here is a quote from David Copperfield taken from the Dickens Character page where young David describes Mr. Heep:

“David describes him as a red-haired person – a youth of fifteen, as I take it now, but looking much older – whose hair was cropped as close as the closest stubble; who had hardly any eyebrows, and no eyelashes, and eyes of a red-brown, so unsheltered and unshaded, that I remember wondering how he went to sleep. He was high-shouldered and bony; dressed in decent black, with a white wisp of a neckcloth; buttoned up to the throat; and had a long, lank, skeleton hand, which particularly attracted my attention, as he stood at the pony’s head, rubbing his chin with it, and looking up at us in the chaise. He had a way of writhing when he wanted to express enthusiasm, which was very ugly.”

This is what I love, those deep, rich descriptions that only Dickens can give us.  I literally feel like Uriah Heep is at best, a creepy guy!  Can’t you just see Heep in your mind from that description?  He makes me shudder.

Try on some classics by authors that you would like to emulate.   Amazon free Classics is a great start to finding authors that you will like.  I like to check out the style of other authors to see if I can incorporate that into my own writing.

Who is your favorite classical novelist?

Thanks for visiting and taking the journey with me!

Silver Threading

About Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen M. Chesebro is an American Novelist & Poet who loves writing paranormal fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, syllabic poetry, and creative nonfiction. She loves all things magical which may mean that she could be experiencing her second childhood—or not. That part of her life hasn’t been fully decided yet. A few years ago, a mystical experience led her to renew her passion for writing and storytelling. These days she resides in the fantasy realm of the Faery Writer where she writes the magical poetry and stories that the fairy nymphs whisper to her in her dreams. Colleen won the “Little and Laugh” Flash Fiction Contest sponsored by the Carrot Ranch Literary Community on November 2017, and in 2018, she won first place for the “Twisted Travel” category. Colleen lives in Arizona with her husband. When she is not writing, Colleen enjoys spending time with her husband. She also loves gardening, reading, and crocheting old-fashioned doilies into works of art. Learn more about Colleen on colleenchesebro.com.
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18 Comments

  1. Good conversation about classics. Currently I’m reading The Grapes of Wrath for my Public Library’s Book Discussion Group. I read it in college and had no idea it was such an exceptional book..

    • I loved that book also. I read it long ago. It seems that it stills rings true. Look at the drought in California and how that is affecting our food. The plight of migrant workers still exists. Sad. It was an excellent read though.

  2. For me, it is Jane Austen! I just downloaded two more of her books from Amazon! Other writers from days long gone that I enjoy are Mark Twain, and Ernest Hemingway (The Sun Also Rises).

    Thank you for the follow! ^..^

    • You are welcome. I like Jane Austin too. I read Emma and Pride and Prejudice this summer too. Actually I like most authors, it just depends on my mood at the time. I download free kindle books from new unknown authors also because I want them to have a chance also. Great to have another lover of classics to follow 😀

  3. I’ve been downloading sci-fi classics from Amazon for my oldest to read, and found myself re-reading them. Sometimes it’s difficult for them to read Jules Verne and HG Wells, but I think that my oldest is starting to enjoy them. Great song, btw. Love Uriah Heep.

    • I must confess I had never read David Copperfield before so I was stunned when I read the name Uriah Heep! I remembered this group! I knew you would get it. I do love the classics! Loads of sites to help you understand the writings now.

  4. Excellent post, Colleen! And the illustration is a perfect companion to your writing! Thank you!

  5. You’ve now got me in the mood to pull out the old classics!!!!

  6. What a brilliant post Colleen. I love Charles Dickens as well…Great Expectations. But I adore DH Lawrence, yes – Lady Chatterley’s Lover. I don’t understand people who are offended by it. It’s beautiful.
    Thanks for the post and enjoy your reading.
    Incidentally, I’m nominating you again for this latest blog award. I wrote about it in a previous post. I’ll be in touch. x

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