Dear Tabitha,

I could not believe what I read, but there it was in black and white, right in front of me. I had to write you immediately, because like me, you share an undying curiosity in the world around you. I know what I read will intrigue you. Have you ever heard of the Georgia Guidestones?

The Georgia Guidestones are massive carved slabs placed outside of Atlanta, Georgia in 1980. I came across them while reading the book, “History Decoded,” by Brad Meltzer. You remember, I told you about the T.V. show. I was absolutely dumbfounded by what I had read.

The stone slabs are crafted to track astrological and solar cycles. It is like an American Stonehenge! The man who ordered them to be carved used the name R.C. Christian. He paid for the work to be done in cash. The only catch? He wanted to remain anonymous. I guess no one to this day knows who the man was.

Interestingly, the messages carved in the stones are in English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese, and Russian. There are ten lines of writing on each slab. You have to read from the bottom up or you will get stuck on the first one. Here are the first nine:

“Don’t be a cancer on the earth.”

“Seek harmony.”

“Balance personal rights with social duties.”

“Avoid petty laws.”

“Resolve international conflicts in a world court.”

“Protect people with fair laws.”

“Rule with reason.”

“Unite humanity with a new language.”

“Guide reproduction wisely.”

Number ten really made me gasp. It said, “Maintain humanity under 500 million in perpetual balance with nature.”

I had to read number ten a few times. What would we do with the almost 7 billion people in excess of that? Why were these stones with these directives placed there? Who came up with these directives? It all sounds kind of ominous to me.

The further I read in the chapter the more questions I had. One idea they came up with in the book was that the pseudonym, R. C. Christian is a direct reference to Christian Rosenkreutz and the Rosicrucians. We will have to find out more about them.

I am not sure about any of this. I will be glad when you get here next week so that we can tackle this puzzle face to face. I am excited about your visit. Be safe. I love you.

See you next week,

Love, Mom

This letter was part of Writing 101 wherein we were to pick up the nearest book and flip to page 29. What jumps out at you? Start there, and try a twist: write in the form of a letter.  The hyperlinks are provided for further research.

Thanks for stopping by today.  I enjoyed our visit.

Silver Threading