Breaking Grammar Rules in Poetry Writing | Writing Forward

good idea

I like to think that we poets can spread our creative wings when writing poetry. I think we should break the grammar rules. What do you think? ❤

How do poetry writing and grammar rules live inside the same space? Grammar is technical while poetry is creative. Is there a happy medium where these two meet?

Source: Breaking Grammar Rules in Poetry Writing | Writing Forward

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Colleen M. Chesebro is an author of paranormal fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. She loves all things magical which may mean that she could be experiencing her second childhood – or not. That part of her life hasn’t been fully decided yet. A few years ago, a mystical experience led her to renew her passion for writing and storytelling. These days she resides in the fantasy realm of the Fairy Whisperer where she writes the magical poetry and stories that the fairy nymphs whisper to her in her dreams. Colleen lives in Colorado with her husband. When she is not writing, she enjoys spending time with her husband. She also loves gardening, reading, and crocheting old-fashioned doilies into works of art. You can learn more about Colleen at www.colleenchesebro.com.

20 thoughts on “Breaking Grammar Rules in Poetry Writing | Writing Forward

      1. I was being cheeky… Of course I believe in following format structure to create the end product. Such as the 5-7-5 syllable count per line of the haiku I prefer to write. However, I believe in inventing words, designing thoughts from the inside out and tossing rules out of the window that way! ❤

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    1. I do agree that free form poetry does not need rules. At the same time, when it comes to Haiku, Tanka, et al., it would lose its form without the rules. I did not clarify that point. When I think of losing the rules, ee Cummings and Dr. Seuss come to mind. Making up words and the loss of punctuation are a powerful visual in the rhyming world. Creativity in word groupings and sounds are part of the writing process and should be used to convey our words. Great points, Judith. Wait until you see my Thursday post! What a great teacher you are! ❤️

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  1. Rules for poetry writing? I think it depends on the person’s expertise? Can the writer create a poem without punctuation or capitalization and still create a poem that is meaningful, or does the poem become vague? To me, it’s an individual choice to break the rules or not.

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  2. I agree, break the rules, for pete’s sake! Or your own sake, too, I guess, haha.

    I’ve received criticism in the past on some of my poems wherein the critic chastised me for not following the “rules” of poetry. He said I didn’t follow the pentatonic scale or meter or something.

    I also apparently break the rules for genres, too. But, poetry is deeply personal to the writer, I think. I am an amateur “writer”or amateur “blogger” at best, and I’m totally happy with that. I like most of my poems to rhyme, but I guess I’d consider them “freestyle” or “free association” due to my lack of knowledge/education on the topic.

    It’s a relief to see others pondering the same thing! Enjoyed this!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I look forward to reading it! You have a beautiful blog, by the way. I love the background picture of the moon gleaming on the ocean. So deeply beautiful and serene! 🙂 see you tomorrow! hugs, J

        Liked by 1 person

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