Writing Tips

Grammar Rules: Split Infinitives | Writing Forward

FINALLY! Split infinitives explained and how to NOT use them! ❤

What are split infinitives and do grammar rules tell us whether or not we can use them or when it’s appropriate to use them?

Source: Grammar Rules: Split Infinitives | Writing Forward

7 thoughts on “Grammar Rules: Split Infinitives | Writing Forward”

  1. Reblogged this on Just Can't Help Writing and commented:
    Here’s my take on this article:

    I agree with this post: what to do with infinitives is a judgment call. Some observations:
    In the 18th century, pundits thought English needed to be more like Latin, a “more mature” language. You can’t split an infinitive in Latin (nor in Romance languages like French or Spanish–such languages have one-word infinitives). But since English needed to emulate Latin, its two-word infinitive needed to be treated like a Latin one-word infinitive. So there. Obviously English is a very different language from Latin–it’s not a Romance language at all, it’s Germanic–so following a rule meant for a Romance language doesn’t make sense.
    Second, one reason “to boldly go” sounds so good is that placing “boldly” within the infinitive creates an iambic phrase: ././ Iambic is the “natural” meter for English; it’s Shakespeare’s meter, for example. It just plain has a ring.
    So place your adverbs wherever you think they create that ring. (And don’t eschew adverbs universally, either. They have important roles in prose.)

    Liked by 1 person

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