Spotlight on #Blog Visions for 2017 ~ New Year’s Delight

Here is a great gathering of authors you’re going to love! Happy New Year! 🎉🥂

TINA FRISCO

Flower Garden by Lucie Stastkova Image courtesy of Lucie Stastkova

I’ve thought for some time now that I’d like to have a theme for my blog. Many of the blogs I follow have themes I find most enjoyable. I’ve asked several of these folks to be my guest, tell us what they envision for their blog in 2017, and include their images and links.

I want to thank all of those who responded and wish them great success in the New Year. They are listed below in alphabetical order by first name. Please visit their sites, like and follow, and perhaps download a book or two. Enjoy! 

*************

Allan HudsonAllan Hudson ~South Branch Scribbler

2017 will see the South Branch Scribbler hosting a variety of authors with some artists, photographers, and musicians. I have a lineup of terrific folks for the first three months of the New Year and am adding more weekly. I will be trying…

View original post 3,407 more words

Calcite Fairy Stones – Where to Find Them

It has been Christmas at my house today… all over again! The calcite fairy stone necklaces, made by IreneDesign2011 have arrived! One look at these magical pendants and you too will want a fairy stone like Abby wears in The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy.

Here’s how to get your own:

The small calcite heart stone pendant is at the left near the hummingbird on the cover. Here is the link to Irene’s Etsy site where you can buy your own pendant: https://www.etsy.com/listing/480852170/black-silk-necklace-with-silver-wrapped

The large calcite heart stone pendant is pictured at the right just above my name. Here is the link: https://www.etsy.com/listing/480852682/black-silk-necklace-with-silver-wrapped

You can read more about Irene, who designed the necklaces here. Please stop by and check out her blog, IreneDesign2011, and let her know what you think. Aren’t the necklaces gorgeous?

HealingCrystalsforyou.com will explain the various uses for calcite. Green calcite (considered to be the fairy stone) is especially useful at the heart chakra. ❤

I’ve completed the final CreateSpace document upload for The Heart Stone Chronicles today. My heart is full! Thanks for sharing this exciting time with me.

Happy New Year!

Ringing in the New Year – A Tanka

121616_1902_TheAmberHai1.jpg

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly Tanka challenge. This week, I kept the prompt words of ‘last and few.’ Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. By the way, please link your Tanka to my post found here.

Ron and I have so much to be thankful for this year. My heart swells at the outpouring of love and friendship from my blogging community. Thank you all for making this a memorable year for me.

Don’s forget, great excitement lies just around the corner… On January 3, 2017, The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy will finally be published. I can hardly contain my excitement! 😀

I would like to take this time to wish you peace and happiness.

The last hours tarry –

between the Yule and New Year,

time is suspended.

When Auld Lang Syne sweetly sings

hope recharges our spirits.

© 2016 Colleen M. Chesebro

Happy New Year everyone! ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #14 – LAST & NEW

121216_1910_ColleensWee1.jpg

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months).

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 13th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WARM & CHEER: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Bonding over coffee – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

#AMWRITING COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY PROMPT CHALLENGE #13 – WARM & CHEER/Two on a Rant

gathered in one place | rivrvlogr

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge #13 Cheer & Warm | Annette Rochelle Aben

Snow (tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

The Yule Log – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

 Warm & Cheer | thoughts and entanglements

Wishes for 2017 | method two madness

Wishes for 2017, by Method Two Madness

Fighting for good cheer.
Returning to warmth, friends, home.
Setting voices free.

Making sense without despair:
choosing with hope.  And singing.

© 2016 Method Two Madness

I really enjoyed the above Tanka and thought her words expressed the holiday season perfectly!

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: LAST & NEW

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

#TANKA TUESDAY!

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES.

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I LOVE HEARING FROM YOU! 

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Colleen’s Book Reviews – The 2016 BOOK AWARDS

WELCOME TO MY FIRST ANNUAL BOOK AWARDS PRESENTATION

I have been reviewing books for a couple of years now but never had the time or opportunity to do an annual awards post. 2016 has been filled with so much to be thankful for that I decided to recognize some of the books and authors whose writing made an impact on me, with the hopes that someone else will read these same books. It is a way that I can pay forward some of the enjoyment that I have received and recognize some outstanding Indy authors.

First, I must share that at the drafting of this post, I have read and reviewed a total of 63 books in 2016. That in itself is quite a feat! If you are looking for last minute Christmas Gifts, this is the place to SHOP!

Here’s how I chose the winners of my 2016 Annual Book Awards:

I selected the front-runners from my 5-star reviews. In my estimation, these are the books and authors who had the most impact on me. I do not say this lightly. Many of these authors have a way with words, and they have transported me to magical places. This is the true essence of why we write – not only to entertain but to be remembered in the hearts of our readers. Message received!

Image credit: Quotelr.com

I have created an award photo for each of the categories. If you would like a copy of the image to use as a widget on your blog, feel free to copy or contact me, and I will email you a copy. Also, I have included the link to Amazon (where the books can be purchased) and also to my review so you can get an idea what the book is about. Click the author’s name to visit their blog.

Please check out the books and reviews. Your support means much to these authors.

Catching Feathers in the Wind, by Diane Hall

Support this author on Amazon

Yellow Hair, by Andrew Joyce

Support this author on Amazon

Book Bites, by Uvi Poznansky, et al

Support these authors on Amazon

Which Half David, by Mark W. Sasse

Support this author on Amazon

The Iron Pendulum, by Eloise De Sousa

Support this author on Amazon

Pearseus – Schism, by Nicholas Rossis

Support this author on Amazon

Genteel Secrets, by S. R. Mallery

Support this author on Amazon

Angel Messages: A Wing & a Prayer, by Annette Rochelle Aben

Support this author on Amazon

Hashes & Bashes, by P. J. Colando

Support this author on Amazon

Beginnings – Escaping Psychiatry Prequel, by Olga Nunez Miret

Support this author on Amazon

A Merry Mountain Christmas, by P. C. Zick

Support this author on Amazon

Image credit: Pinterest – Book Quotes

Thank you for stopping by. I hope you enjoyed the awards and the books!

See you next year! ❤

Colleen’s #BOOK #REVIEWS – “Hashes & Bashes,” BY Author, P J COLANDO

  • Title:  Hashes and Bashes: Jackie & Steve Book 2
  • Author: P J Colando
  • File Size: 1337 KB
  • Print Length: 225 Pages
  • Publisher: BookBaby
  • Publication Date: September 13, 2016
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01LWV02LG
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Genre Fiction, Family Life, Humor, Literature & Fiction

*I voluntarily reviewed an Advanced Reader’s Copy of this book*


“FAITH… FAMILY… FRENZY!

Nine months after their comically abbreviated RV road trip, detailed in the award-winning book, STASHES, the Breeden family farm routines have stabilized: Jackie returned to her high school cafeteria job and their only son, Brandon, works alongside his father, Steve, in the family micro-dairy.

But then an outsider arrives, claiming to be kin, and HASHES & BASHES begin.

Steve was already perturbed with the brother he has when Carl Edwards strides onto the farm. David Breeden, who lives nearby, is not a bastard but always acted like one. Carl, a charismatic Californian, may be a bastard but doesn’t act like one…

Yet Carl rocks the entire small Midwestern farming community, including a lively cast of characters who assault Steve’s calm-against-chaos pattern in this humorous family saga:

•his spunky farmwife, Jackie, and her meddlesome church lady friends

•his immature son, Brandon, and his female pursuers

•his pastor, who attempts to foist guilt while grubbing funds

•the lure of edible and spreadable medical marijuana and easy money from natural gas fracking

Only Sparty, Steve’s dog, remains steadfast throughout the hijinks. But then…”

I’ve been looking forward to another humorous and heartwarming novel from P J Colando, and let me tell you, “Hashes and Bashes” kept me alternating between laughter and tears. Her first book was called, “Stashes,” and you can read that review by clicking here. Now, grab a seat and let me tell you about this book because you’re going to love it!

What sets P J Colando apart from many others is her ability to draw the reader into the life of her characters. As the reader, you feel like you are her protagonist’s (Jackie) girlfriend and she is sharing with you what is going on in her and Steve’s life while the two of you are drinking tea and eating scones. This makes for some great storytelling. Jackie and Steve are so real to life, you expect to run into them while running errands in town. I know I did at least.

Jackie and Steve represent the perfect Midwest farm couple, hardworking and steadfast. You sense their love for one another seep through the pages. When Carl shows up, Steve’s brother from his mother’s WWII love tryst and given up for adoption, the Breeden family welcomes him into their nest.

Carl and Steve bond through a common acknowledgment of shared genealogy. However, that leaves Steve’s brother David out in the cold. David is the brother you wish you didn’t have, while Carl is likable and real, like Steve. A Prodigal Son triangle develops with impressive results. Once you throw Brandon, Steve and Jackie’s son, into the mix, the results are hilarious.

Years ago I worked on a ranch in Montana. The descriptions of (AI) artificial insemination from Carl’s bull into Steve’s dairy cows by Brandon are not only factually accurate, but they are also hysterical. I laughed so hard, I cried.

Yet, there is more than humor found between these pages. P J Colando breathes and writes life into the pages of her novels. Love, death, friendship, family, all find their way into her stories. Add a touch of pot-laced baking to the mix, and you have a recipe for success.

The end of the book grabbed me by surprise and left me wanting more of this beautiful, and funny family!


Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars


Author, P J Colando

About PJ Colando:

PJ Colando was born and raised in the Midwest, yet unabashedly aspired for adventure elsewhere, following her parents’ model. She lives in southern California with her husband, whose name is not Steve or Carl, the prime male characters in the ‘Jackie and Steve’ series.

PJ is the author of three novels, with short stories, personal essays, and articles published in journals, magazines, and anthologies. She’s earned an Erma Bombeck Humor Award, Reader’s Favorite Silver Award, and Southern California Writers Conference fiction award.

PJ writes contemporary women’s fiction and has drawn praise for her singular voice, humor and satire on contentious current affairs, and insights into human life. PJ writes funny!

Join her on her Boomer humor blog on her author site: http://www.pjcolando.com and on Facebook at PJ Colando.

PJ is having a blast and you will, too.

I hope P J writes another book about the Breeden family. Once you read this so will you! ❤

The Yule Log – A Tanka

Happy Winter Solstice!

Welcome to my contribution for my weekly Tanka challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt words: “warm = warmth and cheer = cheery.” Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. By the way, please link your Tanka to my post found here.

My husband and I decided to initiate a new tradition this year. We are celebrating the Winter Solstice in place of Christmas!

A few months ago, my brother in law had his DNA analyzed. The results were astounding! My husband’s family scored high for a Viking heritage. We were not surprised because they are all rather tall folks. My husband is 6 ft. 7 in., his brother 6 ft. 4 in., and his sister is 6 ft. tall! Let’s just say that the weekly television show called, The Vikings took on new meaning in our household. 😀

vikings-giphy

Image credit: Giphy.com

It seemed fitting to celebrate the Winter Solstice. Christmas had lost meaning for us through the years after the kids moved away. I did some research and found a great site that explains the tradition. Click here to learn more about a Winter Solstice Tradition. I also talk about my plans for our celebration on Mindful Monday on A Mindful Journeysite.wordpress.com, my other blog.

The cheery Yule log –
flames burn to honor the sun,
spreading warmth and light.
Our token good luck ashes
protection for the next year.

©2016 Colleen M. Chesebro

However, you celebrate the season, may you find peace and joy. Hugs!

A Magical Surprise

Guess what came by fairy mail today?

The Heart Stone Chronicles – The Swamp Fairy PROOF

And it’s perfect! I did all my own formatting, too!

Thanks for sharing in the joy of my dream come true. ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #13 – Warm & Cheer

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months).

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 12th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – PEACE & SPIRIT: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Focus | The Poetry Channel

lost, questioning soul | rivrvlogr

No peace – Jane Dougherty Writes *This Tanka and our dialogue, prompted my Mindful Monday post on my other blog: A Mindful Journey site.

Colleens Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 Peace & Spirit | Annette Rochelle Aben

שלום (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Peace & Spirit | thoughts and entanglements

Heated | Lemon Shark Reef

Peace & Spirit – Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 – Ladyleemanila

Tanka – Peace/Spirit | Mother Willow

Offering | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The Amber-Haired Girl – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Norma’s Natterings

Magnetic Poetry Saturday: Circled by Spirit | method two madness

#AmWriting Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 – Peace & Spirit/Two on a Rant

I couldn’t choose between the two Tankas listed below for my favorite of the week. There were so many powerful poems. We all seem to be feeling the unease spreading throughout the world by channeling our feelings into our words. Please click the link at the end of each poem to visit their blogs.

No peace in the waves,

their restless, rolling spirit

sinks hope, a wrecked ship.

But I watch the grey gull soar,

plucking my dreams from the wind.

©2016 Jane Dougherty

~*~

lost, questioning soul
searching for elusive peace
with flagging spirit

discovering the answer
deep within the hearts of men

©2016 Rivrvlogr

Both of these Tanka poems moved me. Well done, friends. ❤

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: WARM & CHEER

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

#TANKA TUESDAY!

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES.

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Colleen’s Coming Attractions – “Wisp,” by Adele Marie Park

One of the best things about blogging is all the people you meet along the way. Today, I am proud to introduce to a new author, Adele Marie Park. Her debut novel, “Wisp” was just published. Are you looking for an exciting and magical read?

Adele and I share the love of fairies and all things magical. Wisp sounds like the perfect book to curl up with on a snowy afternoon with a cup of tea. Here is the blurb to interest you even further:

You can find “Wisp,” on Amazon.

Twitter @Binky567

Facebook at Adele Marie Park

Her blog: firefly465.wordpress.com

Thanks for stopping by to meet Adele.

Books make great Christmas Presents! Put a little magic in your life! ❤