Nuts and Bolts: “Thought” Verbs | LitReactor

“In six seconds, you’ll hate me.

But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward – at least for the next half year – you may not use “thought” verbs.  These include:  Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include:  Loves and Hates.”

“Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them.  Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.”

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Source: Nuts and Bolts: “Thought” Verbs | LitReactor

About Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen M. Chesebro is an American Novelist & Poet who loves writing paranormal fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, syllabic poetry, and creative nonfiction. She loves all things magical which may mean that she could be experiencing her second childhood—or not. That part of her life hasn’t been fully decided yet. A few years ago, a mystical experience led her to renew her passion for writing and storytelling. These days she resides in the fantasy realm of the Faery Writer where she writes the magical poetry and stories that the fairy nymphs whisper to her in her dreams. Colleen won the “Little and Laugh” Flash Fiction Contest sponsored by the Carrot Ranch Literary Community on November 2017, and in 2018, she won first place for the “Twisted Travel” category. Colleen lives in Arizona with her husband. When she is not writing, Colleen enjoys spending time with her husband. She also loves gardening, reading, and crocheting old-fashioned doilies into works of art. Learn more about Colleen on colleenchesebro.com.
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10 Comments

  1. Pingback: Writing Links 4/24/17 – Where Genres Collide

  2. Reblogged this on D.B. Mauldin and commented:
    Verbs

  3. I was scared as I started to read this article but having finished reading I am elated to try this. As Becca said: The first sentence showing the easy way is like a Richard Laymon book and the second, harder but better for readers, is like a Stephen King book. Great find Colleen. xx

  4. Hiding Flower Shoes I learned something similar How often do used excellent, good, and great? Whenever I it comes to my attention I am using the same word , I look for another way to say the same thing

Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

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