Author Spotlight – Guest Post: David R. Jordan, “Writing A Bhikku’s Tale.”


Welcome to my Author Spotlight – Guest Posts

I have started a new feature on my blog, called Author Spotlight – Guest Posts. As you can see from the image above, I am looking for themed posts about fairies, myths, and magic. If you are an interested author and would like to be featured on my blog, please click HERE to find out more.

My guest today, is Dave Jordan, the author of “A Bhikku’s Tale. Dave is also a lover of myths and storytelling. It’s funny, but we always seem to find those of us who dabble in the art of fantasy. He hails from Cork Ireland, and you know that is the birthplace of everything magical in our world! Even his blog name is romantic: “Shadow of the Glen.” Dave also writes poetry and has a book of verse published, called “The End.” Click here to find it on Amazon.

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Writing A Bhikku’s Tale, by Dave Jordan

A Bhikku’s Tale is steeped not just in mythology but story. Anyone who enjoys a good tale well told will find it satisfying, I hope.

Every day we encounter many stories: newspaper stories, TV and film stories, stories we hear from family and friends. We need stories to shape and understand both ourselves and the world in which we live. Stories take us on a journey, even if it is just a song heard on the car radio or a joke. Like all good journeys, the getting there is more important than the destination. Those are just some of the reasons why I am a fan of stories and mythology.

In writing A Bhikku’s Tale, I wanted to play around with elements of Irish myth and ideas from my own imagination. The notion of play is often associated with the term Postmodernism, but I wouldn’t hold it down to just this. In my book, all art comes from play. Always has and always will. There is plenty of work involved too but, essentially, it’s about play. I had such fun writing A Bhikku’s Tale! I hope that the reader will have just as much fun.

Two writers who have had a strong influence on my work are Neil Gaiman and Clive Barker. Both are master fabulists, and both are Brits.

I wanted to write a book about fantastic and mythological creatures, putting them into a modern context. A modern Irish context. I am 100% honest when I say that I have never heard of such a book being written in mainstream Irish fiction.

Irish mythology is an absolute treasure trove of stories, ideas, and characters that appeal to the imagination. Some people might frown on the way I use Irish myth and legend. They might see Irish mythology as sacred and not touched in any way.

I believe that, like all other mythologies, Irish myth and legend have survived and grown through people retelling and rewriting them. Mythology is something that should be shared by everyone, and all artists and writers should be free to use them in any way they want, in order to say what they want to say.

As mentioned earlier, I put quite a few original ideas and characters into the book. I’m a big fan of imagination. I believe that it is important not just for art but also for solving social and environmental problems, amongst others.

I strongly believe the imagination can change the world or, at least, change the way we see it. But, getting back to the book, although there is lots of Irish and other mythology in there, you really don’t need to know much about it to enjoy the work. All you need is imagination and a love of story, two things we are all blessed with, even if you don’t know it.

“Deep in a forest of Inis Fail, there was a cabin, well hidden, in which there lived a solitary bhikku…”
Bhikku Reilly of Fararden Wood has defeated the mad god Morpheo’s dragon with the help of Red City’s shaman, Murray. Now they face a much harder task. 
In a fight with Cernunnos, Morpheo has broken off a piece antler from the horned god, which gives him immeasurable power over the natural world. Reilly and Murray, together with the Green Man, the Sybarite and the ghost girl, Tracy, must pursue the mad god and stop him from taking over the whole country of Inis Fail. 
Their journey takes them to the Otherworld and back again, crossing the paths of many colourful characters and strange creatures.”

Click HERE to read an excerpt from the book.

Buy on Amazon

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Author, David R. Jordan

I’m writing out of Cork, Ireland, where I was born and bred. As well as writing fiction and poetry I play the bass guitar. Steve Harris from Iron Maiden is my bass god. My favourite author is either WB Yeats or James Joyce – I can’t decide which, but I also love popular fiction, especially dark fantasy: Clive Barker, Neil Gaiman, Stephen King and Alan Moore are all huge influences on my writing.

I love to quote. My current favourite quote is by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche: ‘You need to have some chaos within you to give birth to a dancing star.’

I love dogs, the great outdoors and coffee. My favourite film is A River Runs Through It. My favourite song is Little Wing by Jimi Hendrix.

Stop by and say hello to Dave on his Blog: https://shadowoftheglen.wordpress.com/ or on his Facebook page at:

Love youThanks for stopping by!

13 thoughts on “Author Spotlight – Guest Post: David R. Jordan, “Writing A Bhikku’s Tale.” Leave a comment

  1. This post is fascinating! I totally agree with you about the importance of imagination-imagination can and does change the world! And I love the Nitzsche quote you use here. Thanks for sharing your imagination with us …

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I had been wanting to do this feature for a while. I honestly didn’t think many authors would be interested… but, the more I thought I about it, I realized it gave an author a chance to show off their writing talent. I’m so happy you went first, Robbie. David’s book sounds amazing. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  2. When mythology and imagination merge, the stories become incredibly amazing. Thanks for introducing this feature Colleen…David’s book seems interesting. Wishing him great success. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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