Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 53 – MIST & SHAPE

Welcome to POETRY TUESDAY!

Image credit: Pinterest: Happy Tuesday Quotes

Congratulations! This is the beginning of our second year of writing amazing poetry. To keep things interesting, I’ve added a few new poetry forms. Have fun and remember the key to writing these poetry forms is to follow the rules, count syllables, and count the lines. ❤

Please note:
We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The biggest change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in different parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on determining the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your own work.

The main objection of this challenge is to learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are submitting your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them. Check the rules by clicking on the links below. ❤

READ
Writer’s Define Poetry’s Role in Today’s Society

Image credit: Pinterest: Poems

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the link to learn about each type:

HAIKU in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA in English  5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN in English  Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.

  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain

Senryu in English  5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and must have some sort of irony present.

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have ONE week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images at Canva.com or
Crello.com

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Synryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN HOW TO LINK YOUR WORDPRESS BLOG TO TWITTER

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 52nd POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – SPIRIT & JOY

(I LOVED your enthusiasm, and how many of you couldn’t resist trying out the new poetry forms as I unveiled the instructions. What fun! You guys make me so proud).

Happy Anniversary, Colleen! – Reena Saxena

Prompted Poetry – Shift & Shake

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 52 ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL #Haiku: “SPIRIT & JOY” #2 – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 52 ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL #Tanka: “SPIRIT & JOY” – Mick E Talbot Poems

Waiting for You – #Tanka | Trent’s World (the Blog)

 Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 52 #Haiku #Tanka #Haibun: “SPIRIT & JOY” | willowdot21

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge Spirit & Joy | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 52 ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL #Tanka: “SPIRIT & JOY” | But I Smile Anyway…

Spirit and Joy – Colleen’s Weekly Haiku Challenge #52 – Afterwards

 Celebrations – Spirit & joy | radhikasreflection

Stirred, not shaken – Playing with words

Ruled by the Heart – Smell The Coffee

The Duality Tomb – 3y3 Wonder

Tanka Tuesday: Spirit and Joy – Jane Dougherty Writes

Love’s Daughter | like mercury colliding…

A #Haiku for Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge No. 52 – Frank J. Tassone

Spirit & Joy | thoughts and entanglements

Graceful Giant – By Sarah

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge 52 – The Bag Lady

#Haiku (Double): Joy of Spirit | Charmed Chaos

Brinkmanship #midnighthaiku | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #52: Spirit & Joy – Stuff & What If

Uplifting – Reena Saxena

Tanka: Spirit and Joy | Willow Poetry

#Tanka: Spirit & Joy – Storie Cantabile

A Cinquain Reply – Mick E Talbot Poems

Momentary (Senryu) | Darkness of His Dreams

October 2017: Tidings | method two madness

Earth and Stars, Music – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Don’t FORGET! If you are selected as my Poet of the Week, your poem will also be featured in my bi-monthly newsletter.

Sign-up HERE.

This week’s Poet of the Week is author and poet, Sue Vincent, from her blog, Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo. Her Haibun/Haiku is called Brinksmanship. The photos are dramatic and add to the Haibun, also.

Rising in silence
Spirit of sorrow and joy
Erasing the night

I watch the sun rise from my doorstep. Inside, the humdrum necessities await. Outside, the small dog explores the garden with the same excitement every morning. Birds sing, the weather, fair or foul, reveals itself and adds its definition to the possibilities to come. I am poised on the brink of belief.

I have a choice. I can face the day ahead with weariness, plodding through its demands, resentment building. I can accept the daily gauntlet of challenges. Or embrace them with open arms, knowing that what comes, must be. The dawn brings its own gifts. My daily task is to see them.

©2017 Sue Vincent

“Notice how her haiku highlights her prose although she doesn’t repeat her personal thoughts. Here are rules so you can see how perfect I think her Haibun is:”

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

Remember, when writing a Haibun, it’s the discovery of the link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of this form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening. ❤

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: MIST & SHAPE

(any forms of the words and don’t forget to use synonyms)

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

82 thoughts on “Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge No. 53 – MIST & SHAPE

  1. Good October words, Colleen. (How is it October already?) I will have time to catch up with others and get this week’s poem in on time! I put one up last night for spirit and joy. I thought I got it in just before the deadline. But, oops, maybe not. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: BOO! | Sweet aroma

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