“Searching for the Magic, A Double-Tanka

Life is likea cup of tea

This week for my Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge, I used alter for change, and resisting for deny.

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In the early hours—
before dawn’s pink light explodes,
I alter my view
of the cosmos in my mind
resisting a mundane life.

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Searching for magic
amongst all the disasters
thrown at me daily—
finding the humor inside,
by learning to love myself.

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

 

 

Hugs n kisses Thanks for stopping by. ❤

 

Colleen’s 2018 #Book #Reviews – “Twenty Years After I Do,” by Author, D. G. Kaye

book reviews

Title: Twenty Years After I Do ~ Reflections on Love & Changes After Aging

Amazon Author Page: D. G. Kaye

Publication Date: November 29, 2017

Formats: Paperback & Kindle

Genres: Marriage & Long Term Relationships, Memoirs, Marriage & Adult Relationships, Personal Growth, Spirituality

Goodreads

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

May/December memoirs.

In this personal accounting, D.G. Kaye shares the insights and wisdom she has accrued through twenty years of keeping her marriage strong and thriving despite the everyday changes and challenges of aging. Kaye reveals how a little creative planning, acceptance, and unconditional love can create a bond no obstacle will break. Kaye’s stories are informative, inspiring, and a testament to love eclipsing all when two people understand, respect, and honor their vows. She adds that a daily sprinkling of laughter is a staple in nourishing a healthy marriage.

Twenty years began with a promise. As Kaye recounts what transpired within that time, she shows that true love has no limits, even when one spouse ages ahead of the other.

MY RECOMMENDATION:

Canadian author, D. G. Kaye has written a heartwarming memoir in “Twenty Years After I Do,” detailing the ups and downs of marriage to an older man. I was eager to read this book because I am married to a man who is older than me by a decade. I wasn’t sure what I’d find, but having read other books by this author, I knew I was in for a treat.

Kaye shares how she met her husband, Gordon, chronicling how he swept her off her feet with his captivating personality, and how he made her laugh. With a sense of intimacy, the writing draws you in, as if you are listening to a good friend. Their connection, a true love story, (so rare these days) was a joy to experience through her words.

This book is a memoir in the real sense of the word, where the author details her relationship with her husband based on her knowledge of his battle with prostate cancer. As time trudges along, and more health issues crop up, this couple finds themselves confronting their mortality head-on. Most people would crumble under the stress of these burdens, but not Kaye. Because of the love that she and Gordon share they discover that they can overcome whatever life throws at them.

What I enjoyed was Kaye’s willingness to share the innermost details of her life experiences so others could learn from her example. There was no glossing over here, and she does tell it like it is. Ultimately, she leads the reader to the conclusion that love and humor conquer all. I’ve taken many of her insights and tucked them away for future reference.

A quick read, “Twenty Years After I Do,” will touch you with warmth and sincerity, as the phrase “…till death do us part…” takes on new meaning.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 Fairies

5 fairies

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

About the Author:

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Author, D. G. Kaye

D.G. Kaye was born and resides in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of Conflicted Hearts – A Daughter’s Quest for Solace From Emotional Guilt, Meno-What? – A Memoir, Words We Carry, Have Bags, Will Travel, P.S. I Forgive You, and her newest release – Twenty Years: After “I Do”. Kaye is a nonfiction/memoir writer and writes about her life experiences, matters of the heart and women’s issues.

Kaye writes to inspire others. Her writing encompasses stories taken from events she encountered in her own life and the lessons that were taken from them. Her sunny outlook on life developed from learning to overcomes some of the many obstacles that challenged her. From an emotionally neglected childhood to growing up with a narcissistic mother, leaving her with a severely deflated self-esteem, D.G. began seeking a path to rise above her issues. When she isn’t writing intimate memoirs, Kaye brings her natural sense of humor into her other works.

D.G. began writing when pen and paper became tools to express her pent-up emotions during a turbulent childhood. Her writing began as notes and cards she wrote for the people she loved and admired when she was afraid to use her voice.

Through the years, Kaye journaled about life, writing about her opinions on people and events and later began writing poetry and health articles for a Canadian magazine as her interest grew in natural healthcare. Kaye became interested in natural healing and remedies after encountering a few serious health issues. Against many odds, D.G. has overcome adversity several times throughout her life.

D.G. began writing books to share her stories and inspiration. Her compassion and life experiences inspire her to write from the heart. She looks for the good and the positive in everything and believes in paying it forward.

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return, Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”

D.G.’s Favourite Saying: “Live. Laugh. Love …and don’t forget to breathe!”

When D.G. is not writing, she’s reading. Her favourite genres of reading are: biographies, memoirs, writing and natural health. Kaye loves to read about people who overcome adversity, victories, and redemption and believes we have to keep learning–there is always room for improvement! She loves to cook, travel, and play poker (when she gets the chance).

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How to Connect with the Author:

Blog:  dgkayewriter.com

TWITTER:  @pokercubster

FACEBOOK D.G. Kaye

http://www.about.me/d.g.kaye.writer
http://www.google.com/+DebbyDGKayeGies
http://www.linkedin.com/in/dgkaye7

heartsThanks for stopping by to meet D. G. Kaye. I loved this book and how this couple overcame adversity with humor and a steadfast love for each other. It’s pure inspiration!

follow me on bookbub If you have your book posted on BookBub, I will add my review there also! ❤ Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro)

The Literary Divas Library facebook

Are you looking for more great reads? Join author, D.G. Kaye, and myself in our Facebook group, The Literary Diva’s Library to find book reviews, book promotions, & special deals on books from authors you love.

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Don’t forget to join us in the #ABRSC, Author Blogger Rainbow Support Club on Facebook. See you there! ❤

The Rodeo is Coming! Are YOU Ready to Write?

From Charli Mills at the Carrot Ranch Literary Community:

“Writers have to have the grit of a buckaroo who carries his saddle between rodeos. Writers have to have the tenacity to not quit the longest ride they’ll ever have chasing publication the way bull-riders chase those perfect 8-seconds. Writers have to be willing to take down the big goats.

That’s why we rodeo at Carrot Ranch. All year we practice the literary art form of flash fiction in 99 words, no more, no less. So once a year we put those skills and safe writes to the test. We rodeo.

A rodeo is a contest in which writers show their skills with the flash fiction form. It’s an exciting break from the weekly challenges and an opportunity to compete. Like a cowboy rodeo, this event includes different contest categories to show off a variety of skills. The 2018 Flash Fiction Rodeo runs October 1-31.

Contestants will get to wrangle tight word constraints, tell emotive, compelling and surprising stories, and write across genres and audiences. Some contests will call for specific craft skills, like using dialog to carry a story. Other contests will add twists to the prompts.

The following Rodeo Leaders return to stimulate your writing this October: Geoff Le PardIrene WatersSherri MatthewsNorah Colvin, and D. Avery. Over the next five weeks, each leader will introduce you to their contest, judges, and tips for competing. Each contest comes with a top prize for the winner: $25.”

Click the link below to learn more. This is one contest you will not want to miss!

https://carrotranch.com/2018/08/22/are-you-ready-to-rodeo/

GiddyUP See you THERE!

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 99, “Change & Defy,” #SynonymsOnly

tanka tuesday fall

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


 

PLEASE NOTE: This challenge is for Tanka, Haiku, Senryu, Haibun, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

 

WootHELP ME grow this challenge. Please SHARE, or use PRESS THIS. ❤ Thank you.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

~*~

One Sentence Poems: Now Seeking Submissions

As their name suggests, One Sentence Poems is an online literary journal publishing poems composed of a single sentence.

A project of Ambidextrous Bloodhound Productions and a relative of the literary journal Right Hand Pointing, One Sentence Poems has been publishing a new poem every Tuesday through Saturday since 2014. You can get a sense of their style by reading the poems they publish online.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions all the time. They respond to all submissions, usually within two weeks. After they accept a poem, they publish it online in the following few weeks.

Poets may submit up to four single-sentence poems of at least two lines. In other words, each poem must have at least one line break. They publish poems in any form, though they prefer left-justified poems and usually don’t care for scattered forms.

Each poem must consist of one complete and grammatically correct sentence. That means it must begin with a capital letter and end with a terminal punctuation mark. Using semicolons to connect sentences is cheating. Long sentences are fine, but a reader should be able to speak the poem in one breath.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions online, but not via post or by email. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to One Sentence Poems, please visit their website at http://www.onesentencepoems.com/osp/how-to-submit/.

 

Do it

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

 

can i help you

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

 

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

 

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

 

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

 

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

tanka tuesday fall

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: “Change & Defy,” #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted

“The Feather,” Flash Fiction

August 23, 2018, Carrot Ranch Literary Community Flash Fiction prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story that includes magic. It can be a supernatural force, a moment or idea, or use it as a verb. Go where the prompt leads. Respond by August 28, 2018.

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I finished my gardening chores and wrapped the hose into a coil. There on the ground was a tiny grey feather. I picked it up and placed it under my gloves on the table for safe keeping.

I walked toward the front garden where my daylilies drooped. I held the spray over the plants, and there on the ground was another gray feather!

I hurried to retrieve the first feather, but it was gone. It was then, the magic of the moment struck me. Without a doubt, this feather had wanted me to find it. What could it mean?

true story

A memoirist I will never be, but nevertheless, this happened to me last week. There is plenty of evidence that finding a feather (or a magical one, as I did) represents some good omens.

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Two days later, I found a black feather, much larger, lodged in the rocks across from where I sit on my patio. Coincidence? Not to this fairy whisperer…

Click HERE to learn about the magic of finding a feather. ❤

all the best writing Thanks for stopping by. ❤

 

Colleen’s #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 98, “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules on the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

CHANGES ARE COMING TO WORDPRESS!

I have no idea how this will affect us for this challenge or blogging with WordPress. I’ll try to roll with the changes.

In the meantime, I’ve upgraded to the business plan so that I could get a plugin to stay with the original WordPress editor.

Click this link to learn more: Writer’s Tips – #Friday Blog share – #Selfpublishing – #WordPress Changes Coming/D.G. Kayewriter.com


PLEASE NOTE: Don’t forget to count your syllables. Use this site: howmanysyllables.com. Click on the workshop tab. Then, copy and paste your poem into the box, and click “count syllables” at the bottom.


For some, this challenge is a way to learn more about writing in English, even though it’s the American version. English is a second language to many of our participants.

I also understand that accent and inflection play a key roll in the way you say certain words and this will change the syllable count. Here is my compromise: Please try to get as close to the syllable count as possible when writing these syllabic forms of poetry.

This challenge is not for free-verse poetry. ❤

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown an impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do. ❤

Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Sue Vincent, and her poem, Cliché… This poem really stood out to me because the first part is a Cinquain which creates the first act of what will follow. In this way, the Cinquain sets up the synonyms for the words, “sad and write.”

Yet, it is the rhythmic stanzas that flow afterward which give this poem its power. Interesting to note, her syllables used per line are in an 8 syllable, 6 syllable pattern almost all the way to the end, illustrating the metre power of the iambic pentameters in her words.

 

robin-hoods-stride-2
Cliché
Hackneyed, outworn,
Sighing, mourning, why-ing
Penned expressions of emotion
Human

*

It is, they say, just a cliché
To pen a mournful verse,
An ode to love, a billet doux,
A burning flame…or worse…

And yet, the universal pen
Of lovers everywhere
Turns first to rhyme and doggerel
When seeking words of care.

Perhaps the poet and the heart
Have gone too deep for skill
And with emotion’s misaimed sword
Their own expressions kill?

Sometimes a cliché’s all that works
… The rose and turtle dove…
To confine hearts to paper words
(Or find a rhyme for ‘love’).

Do not dismiss the doggerel;
Within outmoded form,
The heart that seeks the words to speak
Is genuine and warm.

Although the words are shaped awry
And though the phrases pall,
The love they hold is not cliché’d
But at the heart of all.

© 2018 Sue Vincent

“Poetry is not an expression of the party line. It’s that time of night, lying in bed, thinking what you really think, making the private world public, that’s what the poet does.” Allen Ginsberg

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HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 98th POETRY CHALLENGE USING SYNONYMS FOR THE WORDS: “Sad & Write”

 Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge No. 98, “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly | willowdot21

Tanka – Turmoil! | radhikasreflection

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Challenge – Sad & Write #MicroPoetry #Cinquain | But I Smile Anyway…

How poetry works – ….Bilocalalia….

Sharing With Others –

Acedia Mood: A #TankaTuesday #TankaProse – Frank J. Tassone

Cliché… | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge Sad & Write | Annette Rochelle Aben

A Type of Artist (Senryu) – Let Me Tell You the Story of…

Crickets: Darkness and Light: Haibun – Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Colleen’s Poetry Challenge/D.G. Kaye Writer.com

adieu | like mercury colliding…

memories consume.. – syncwithdeep

Poetry Friday ~ Sad & Write | The Writer Next Door|Vashti Q

Glimpse of Wonder | Stuff and what if…

Severed Synapse | method two madness

Twilight Fading – Charmed Chaos

Hummingbirds Rain Truce–Haiku – John Maberry’s Writing

 Undelivered #Senryu #Poetry – Poems for Warriors

 Tanka Tuesday: Sad & Write – Jane Dougherty Writes

Tanka Tuesday – Truth | Twenty Four

For Maisie – “our heroine for all time” | Mucky Boots and Flawless Paws

Colleen’s Poetry Challenge/The Shower of Blessings.com

Dying Dreams – thehouseofbailey

Departure/Willow Poetry

Regards The new challenge is up Tuesday morning. See you there! ❤

 

 

Shared from the: Smorgasbord End of Summer Party – Afternoon Tea – Colleen Chesebro, Sue Hampton, Jane Gogerty, Norah Colvin, Jane Risdon, Wendy Janes, Gigi Sedlmayer, Jena C. Henry and Darlene Foster

Sally Cronin is having an end of summer party! Come on and join in!

Welcome to the second of the end of summer party meals today. Afternoon Tea is a time for sandwiches, cakes, and scones… and I hope my guests today have brought their appetites with them. Later on this evening… a dinner party to round the day off. And tomorrow Sunday Lunch.

Click the link below to meet some fabulous authors, including yours truly. ❤

End of Summer Afternoon TEA

 

P. S. I’ve updated my blog to the business plan. Please let me know if you are having a hard time finding me so I can let WordPress know. ❤

 

Comet

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A fabulous group of talented writers sharing stories about comets. Settle in and have a read. ❤

Carrot Ranch Literary Community

With trails that stretch across the sky, some comets burn so brightly they appear during the light of day. They burn into our imaginations, sparking questions and prophecies. Some people dance (naked), some despair.

Writers flashed comets this week with tales from around the world and both hemispheres. Take a ride on a comet through the literary art of flash fiction.

The following is based on the August 16, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about a comet.

PART I (10-minute read)

The Comet of 1858 by James McCanles (5th-great-grandfather of Charli Mills)

Hail! beautious stranger to our sky,
How bright thy robes appear,
Noiseless thou trends thy paths on high,
And converse with all our stars.

In radiant flame of glowing light
Thy silent orb rolls on,
Through vast eternities of night,
To mortal man unknown.

Thy magnitude thy fiery glow,
Thy towering…

View original post 4,055 more words

Colleen’s 2018 #Book #Reviews – “What’s in a Name, Volume I,” by Author, Sally Cronin

book reviews

Title: What’s in a Name ~ Colorful Tales, Volume I

Amazon Author Page: Sally Cronin

Publication Date: February 2, 2017

Formats: Paperback & Kindle

Genres: Short Stories & Anthologies, Literature & Fiction, Single Authors, Short Stories

Goodreads

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

There are names that have been passed down through thousands of years which have powerful and deep-rooted meaning to their bearers. Other names have been adopted from other languages, cultures and from the big screen. They all have one thing in common. They are with us from birth until the grave and they are how we are known to everyone that we meet. There are classical names such as Adam, David, and Sarah that will grace millions of babies in the future. There are also names that parents have invented or borrowed from places or events in their lives which may last just one lifetime or may become the classic names of tomorrow.

Whatever the name there is always a story behind it. In What’s in a Name? – Volume One, twenty men and women face danger, love, loss, romance, fear, revenge and rebirth as they move through their lives. Anne changes her name because of associations with her childhood, Brian carries the mark of ancient man, Jane discovers that her life is about to take a very different direction, and what is Isobel’s secret?

MY RECOMMENDATION:

I love short story collections. There is something about the brevity of words that appeals to my senses, especially when there is a theme that we all can relate to. Think about it. We all have a name, but many of us have no idea why our parents chose that name or the possible stories behind that name.

Sally Cronin tackles this naming issue. In What’s in a Name, each chapter is titled by the name of its main character, leading the reader on a journey of discovery. Every name has a tale to tell, and under the brilliant creativity of this author, each name takes on a personality of its own.

My favorite story was that of “Diana,” a kind woman who choose a husband that proved to be a scoundrel in every sense of the word. With a little help from her family, Diana reaches into her heart and finds the courage to stand up to her husband’s abuse. The pacing of this story is marvelous and carries the reader to a satisfying end.

This compilation of stories covers a wide range of genres. There is something here for everyone. I read these stories a few at a time, savoring the emotions the stories evoked within me. This was my first read by this author, and I look forward to more of her writing. I was thrilled to find that the second volume of What’s in a Name ~ Tales of Life & Romance had already been written. Needless to say, I’ve already purchased my copy.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of What’s in a Name, Volume I as a gift from the author.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 Fairies

5 fairies

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

 

About the Author:

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Author, Sally Cronin

I have been a storyteller most of my life (my mother called them fibs!). Poetry, song lyrics, and short stories were left behind when work and life intruded, but that all changed in 1996. My first book Size Matters was a health and weight loss book based on my own experiences of losing 70kilo. I have written another ten books since then on health and also fiction including three collections of short stories. I am an indie author and proud to be one. My greatest pleasure comes from those readers who enjoy my take on health, characters and twisted endings… and of course come back for more.

REVIEWS are so very important for an author and I am very grateful for the feedback that my books receive. If you have purchased or been gifted one of my books I would love to hear what you think about it. I do have some areas that you can help me with so that I can develop as a writer and it is in this post:

https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/2017/04/18/how-can-we-encourage-more-readers-to-leave-reviews-for-our-books/

As a writer I know how important it is to have help in marketing books.. as important as my own promotion is, I believe it is important to support others. I offer a number of FREE promotional opportunities on my blog and linked to my social media. If you are an author who would like to be promoted to a new audience of dedicated readers, please contact me via my blog. All it will cost you is a few minutes of your time. Look forward to hearing from you.

And for more information on my books listed here at Amazon please visit
https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/my-books/

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How to Connect with the Author:

Blog: https://smorgasbordinvitation.wordpress.com/

TWITTER: @sgc58

FACEBOOK: Sally Cronin

bedtime readingThanks for stopping by to meet Sally and to hear about her book, What’s in a Name. This book is fabulous bedtime reading! ❤

follow me on bookbub If you have your book posted on BookBub, I will add my review there also! ❤ Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro)

The Literary Divas Library facebook

Are you looking for more great reads? Join author, D.G. Kaye, and myself in our Facebook group, The Literary Diva’s Library to find book reviews, book promotions, & special deals on books from authors you love.

ASBRC may2018

Don’t forget to join us in the #ABRSC, Author Blogger Rainbow Support Club on Facebook. See you there! ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 98, “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to Tanka Tuesday

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some poetry?

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY!

I hope you will support the other poets with visits to blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.


Opportunities for Poets

Dime Show Review publishes fiction, flash fiction, ten-word stories, poetry, and essays, both online and in print. They are looking for literature that suspends doubt, writing that appears of its own accord and tells secrets we never suspected but always knew.

Dime Show Review is published three times a year in print, and online on a rolling basis. They accept submissions from February 1 through November 1 each year, and they respond to most submissions within two to twelve weeks. Authors who don’t receive a response within three months are welcome to query.

Authors of fiction may submit one complete story, 3,000 words or fewer. Authors of flash fiction may submit one story, 1,000 words or fewer. Dime Show Review also publishes ten-word stories. Authors may submit up to two of these, and they should be complete stories, exactly ten words each. Poets may submit up to two poems in any form, no longer than two pages each. Authors of nonfiction may submit one essay, 3,000 words or fewer. Submitting authors can read selections from Dime Show Review online to get a sense of their style.

~*~

Radarpoetry.com welcomes unsolicited submissions of poems during our reading period of October 1 through June 30.  

During the months of July, August, and September, we read and administer the Coniston Prize and are open to prize submissions only.  Please see the contest page for details.

Guidelines

Please read the guidelines carefully as they have recently been updated.

We recommend you read our issues to get a sense of our aesthetic before sending your workWe only accept poems only through our submissions managerPoems sent by email will be deleted.

Submit 3-5 original, previously unpublished poems in a single document. We read blind, so please ensure there is no identifying information on the document that contains your poems. You should include a cover letter and a brief bio in the comments boxWe welcome translations as long as all necessary rights have been secured by the translator.

We accept simultaneous submissions and ask that you notify us right away if your work has been accepted elsewhere. For partial withdrawals, simply add a note to your entry on Submittable. We do not accept multiple submissions.

We respond to each submission within a month, and often much sooner than that. After 30 days have passed, feel free to query us. You can also report and track your submission through Duotrope. Unless you are specifically invited to send more work, please wait 6 months after before submitting again.

Former contributors should wait one calendar year after the publication of their poems before submitting again.

We secure first serial rights for poems we publish. Upon publication, all rights revert to the author. We are proud to nominate our contributors for major awards including the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net. We ask that all contributors cite Radar Poetry should their poems be published elsewhere in the future.

We look forward to reading your work!

~*~

Thrushpoetryjournal.com – a journal of poetry that will appear 6 times a year. ( January, March, May, July, September, and November)

We believe in showcasing the best work we receive. We will present a select number of poems per edition.

Submissions are now open. We read submissions on a rolling basis. We are not a paying market.

Submit previously unpublished work only. If you are sending us work that appears on your website, blog, or a self-publishing site, please remove it prior to submitting to us. Send us no more than three poems, pasted in the body of an email, preceded by a cover letter. If your poem requires special formatting, you may then, and please only then, also include an attachment.

Please indicate “POETRY SUBMISSION” on your subject line. Submissions without “Poetry Submission” in the subject line will be deleted unread.

Include a bio (all bios are subject to editing). Also include a URL to your blog or website, if applicable. Simultaneous submissions are allowed, but not preferred. If your work is accepted elsewhere please inform us immediately.

We aim to respond to all submissions within 10 days of receipt (usually less). We will not respond (accept or decline) with a form letter and we will comment on poems whenever possible.

Please wait a minimum of six months between submissions

If your work is accepted at THRUSH, you agree to grant us First North American Serial Rights, all archival rights, plus the rights to reprint in any future anthologies. Upon publication, all rights revert back to the author. You agree that if your poem/s subsequently appears elsewhere (in print or online), you will give due credit to THRUSH.

Our taste is eclectic. We want poems that move us, a strong sense of imagery, emotion, with interesting and surprising use of language, words that resonate.  We want fresh. We want voice.

Established and new poets are encouraged to submit. Experimental poetry is fine, randomness is fine also. However, we do not want experimental and random just for the sake of calling it such. No long poems. We prefer a poem that will fit on one page. We are not interested in inspirational poetry or philosophical musings.

Submissions that ignore these guidelines (or parts of these guidelines) will likely be declined immediately.

We nominate for most major prizes. See our Awards page

Our guidelines are subject to change. We suggest reviewing them prior to submitting.

Submissions and other correspondence should be sent to:  editorthrushpoetryjournal@gmail.com

~*~

One Sentence Poems: Now Seeking Submissions

As their name suggests, One Sentence Poems is an online literary journal publishing poems composed of a single sentence.

A project of Ambidextrous Bloodhound Productions and a relative of the literary journal Right Hand Pointing, One Sentence Poems has been publishing a new poem every Tuesday through Saturday since 2014. You can get a sense of their style by reading the poems they publish online.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions all the time. They respond to all submissions, usually within two weeks. After they accept a poem, they publish it online in the following few weeks.

Poets may submit up to four single-sentence poems of at least two lines. In other words, each poem must have at least one line break. They publish poems in any form, though they prefer left-justified poems and usually don’t care for scattered forms.

Each poem must consist of one complete and grammatically correct sentence. That means it must begin with a capital letter and end with a terminal punctuation mark. Using semicolons to connect sentences is cheating. Long sentences are fine, but a reader should be able to speak the poem in one breath.

One Sentence Poems accepts submissions online, but not via post or by email. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to One Sentence Poems, please visit their website at http://www.onesentencepoems.com/osp/how-to-submit/.

 

goals

Please note: We are all students of poetry. I have given you the instructions on how to write the different forms. Try your best to be as exact as you can. There are no tests, and I don’t grade your work. LOL!

The most meaningful change you will learn about is in writing a Haiku vs. a Senryu. Also, remember, pronunciation in various parts of the world will affect your syllable count. Go with your gut on deciding the syllable count. You are the poet and the creator of your work.

I sponsor this challenge to help poets learn how to write various forms of poetry. Remember, if you are sending your poetry for publication in literary journals, contests, or self-publishing, you should know the correct forms and use them.

hip hip hurray

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Haiku is written about seasonal changes, nature, and change in general.

TANKA IN ENGLISH 5/7/5/7/7 syllable structure. Your Tanka will consist of five lines written in the first-person point of view. This is important because the poem should be written from the perspective of the poet.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH Every Haibun must begin with a title. Haibun prose is composed of short, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first-person singular.

The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all unnecessary words should be pared down or removed. Nothing must ever be overstated.

The poetry never tries to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail. Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – different yet somehow connected.

Cinquain ALSO: Check out the Cinquain variations listed here: Cinquain-Wikipedia These are acceptable methods to use. Please list the form you use so we can learn from you. 

Senryu in English 5/7/5 syllable structure. A Senryu is written about love, a personal event, and have IRONY present. Click the link to learn the meaning of irony.

haiku vs senryu

Image credit: Pinterest.com

(Currently, free-verse prose poems are NOT part of this challenge)

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain links to the participants.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of SUNDAY, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the Recap I publish on Monday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People taking part in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Recap published each Monday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I got this

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose #Senryu, #CinquainPoetry

IF YOU DO NOT HAVE YOUR TWITTER ACCOUNT LINKED TO YOUR BLOG – I WILL NO LONGER TWEET YOUR POETRY… THERE IS NO SENSE SINCE YOUR TWEET BECOMES PART OF WORDPRESS.COM AND THERE IS NO ATTRIBUTION BACK TO YOU.

 Great ideaI have also been sharing your poetry on my Facebook Page here: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Please feel free to FOLLOW, LIKE, & SHARE from my page. ❤

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Life is likea cup of tea

Here are the TWO prompt words for this week’s challenge: “Sad & Write,” #SynonymsOnly

Have fun and write some poetry!

challenge accepted