Colleen’s Pagan Book Reviews – “Fairycraft: Following The Path Of Fairy Witchcraft,” by Morgan Daimler, @MorganDaimler

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS

An in-depth manual for practicing Fairy Witchcraft including theology, fairy lore, rituals, holidays, and magical practices. This book aims to pick up where Pagan Portals – Fairy Witchcraft leaves off and teach interested people the comprehensive practice of this system of honoring the Fair Folk and liminal Gods by blending the old Fairy Faith with modern paganism.

Amazon.com

MY RECOMMENDATION

Morgan Daimler is one of my favorite authors and is an authority on faery witchcraft. It is through her writings and teachings that I discovered my own path. This book changed my life! The connection between faeries and witches is ages old and Daimler brings the old Fairy Faith forward into a more modern neopagan context.

Daimler says:

“…When a neopagan witch chooses to follow the Fairy Faith and blends the two together, the result is a new system, which I am calling Fairy Witchcraft, that uses elements of the beliefs and practices of both to create a whole. It is a way not just to honor the fairies, but also to connect to them and to the Otherworld on a deeper level…”

Daimler, Morgan. Fairycraft: Following The Path Of Fairy Witchcraft (p. 1). John Hunt Publishing. Kindle Edition.

Several years ago, I experienced a miraculous event that opened my eyes to the world of faery. While on a walk one morning, I met what I believe was a fairy elemental. To be fair, this belief is a rather new-age viewpoint, as faeries do not come with a loveable history. Just ask anyone who lives in the U.K.

However, I never fully understood the experience until I read this book. That one event has since become the catalyst that moved me forward on my own pagan path.

I did not understand how to begin my education as a solitary witch following the path of faery. So, I searched for a book to show me the way. Morgan Daimler had me covered!

What you’ll find inside this tome is a wealth of history and knowledge about the path. She covers the ancient beliefs, the gods, faery etiquette and protection, the ancestors, the tools required, and how to set up your ritual spaces, and much more. The author delves deep into Irish traditions, explaining the myths behind the magic.

Of particular interest to me was the term, “fairy doctor.” This was a person who was called upon when fairy involvement was known or suspected, which usually meant there were some sorts of spell or affliction placed upon a human. The fairy doctor would then figure out the best cure to free the person from the affliction.

This fairy doctor, or fairy witch, was open to teaching her skills and passed on her knowledge to her children. My youngest daughter is now the recipient of this knowledge. She’s inherited my gift of plant magic and is now interested in the faery faith.

Forget everything you thought you knew about the fey. Ditch the glitzy Hollywood version of fairies you grew up with and learn the history and mythology that will set you on your own path.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 
5
Reader Engagement: 
5
Reader Enrichment: 
5
Reader Enjoyment: 
5
Overall Rate: 
5 out of 5 Fairies (Of course)

5 fairies

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

About the Author

Morgan Daimler teaches classes and writes about Irish myth and magical practices, fairies, and related subjects.

Morgan’s writing has appeared in a variety of magazines and anthologies including By Blood, Bone, and Blade: A Tribute to the Morrigan and Naming the Goddess.

Morgan is also the author of a variety of fiction and non-fiction books including the urban fantasy/paranormal romance series Between the Worlds, and through Moon Books Where the Hawthorn Grows, Fairy Witchcraft, Pagan Portals: The Morrigan, Pagan Portals: Brigid, Fairycraft, and Pagan Portals Gods and Goddesses of Ireland. Morgan blogs regularly at Living Liminally.

From her blog: “I have been a witch since 1991, following a path based on the Fairy Faith blended with neopagan witchcraft. I love studying other paths and other ways of doing things and I enjoy discussing religion, philosophy and spirituality with people from diverse path. I try to stay active in the pagan community and am always interested in hearing about how other people are doing things. “

How to Connect with the Author

Blog: Living Liminally: http://lairbhan.blogspot.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Morgandaimler/

Twitter: @MorganDaimler

Faery Witch Approved!
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18 thoughts on “Colleen’s Pagan Book Reviews – “Fairycraft: Following The Path Of Fairy Witchcraft,” by Morgan Daimler, @MorganDaimler

    1. I follow the Irish or Celtic paganism. There are scores of stories about the faeries and their interactions with humans. It’s quite interesting and wrapped up in many ancient mythologies. ❤️

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        1. Good question. The Victorian era changed the ideas of fairies being benevolent beings. I’d have to look up the title of the book written in the early 1900’s chronicling experiences between humans and the Fae. That would explain more. I’ll do a post soon. They don’t have wings. They look like humans. Possibly, they live on a different plain of existence. That’s been my experience. ❤️

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  1. Thank you for the very interesting review, Colleen. Myths are always very interesting, and one can dive into another world, for best distraction too. Hope you are staying well, and enjoy the Sunday. Michael

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