“Stone Ghosts” – A #ButterflyCinquain

Image by JamesDeMers from Pixabay

“Stone Ghosts”

stone ghosts
the false idols
of a treasonous past
dedicated to slavery
hateful
tokens of white supremacy
the darkness of death waits
Patriarchy
shattered

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Today, I heard the phrase, “stone ghosts” and felt compelled to put pen to paper (or fingers to the keyboard). The name resonated and touched a chord deep within my soul.

We’re at the pinnacle of a great change. I feel the ripples of hope flowing like waves across the land. Taste the salt of your tears, for the stone ghosts are falling. This American carnage will be defeated.

So Mote it be!

Author: Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen M. Chesebro is an American Novelist & Poet who loves crafting paranormal fantasy and magical realism, cross-genre fiction, syllabic poetry, and creative nonfiction. She loves all things magical, which may mean she is experiencing her second childhood—or not. That part of her life hasn’t been decided yet. A few years ago, a mystical experience led her to renew her passion for writing poetry and storytelling. Colleen sponsors a weekly Syllabic Poetry Challenge, called Tanka Tuesday, on her blog where participants learn how to write traditional and current forms of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, gogyohka, tanka prose, renga, haibun, cinquain, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry. Colleen's syllabic poetry has appeared in the Auroras & Blossoms Poetry Journal, and several other publications. In November 2017, she won the “Little and Laugh” Flash Fiction Contest sponsored by the Carrot Ranch Literary Community. In 2018, she won first place for the “Twisted Travel” category. In 2019, she placed second in the Three Act Story category, with her piece called “The Game.” Colleen is a Sister of the Fey, where she pursues a pagan path through her writing. She lives in Arizona with her husband and black cat, Freyja. When she is not writing, she is reading. She also loves gardening and crocheting old-fashioned doilies into works of art.

44 thoughts on ““Stone Ghosts” – A #ButterflyCinquain”

      1. The statue in your picture – the Robert E. Lee Monument – was erected in Charlottesville, Virginia. There’s a lot of Confederate statues in Virginia because that’s where the largest number of people were killed (both sides) and where the majority of the battles took place. I can tell you more about Confederate monuments and what different kinds mean, but I deleted my 800 word “summary” comment and decided to say “it’s complicated” and each statue should be researched before a decision is reached.

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      2. I respect your opinion on these historical sites, Dr. G. I do know the entire subject is touchy to say the least. I literally took the phrase, “stone ghosts” and let my heart speak the words in poetic thoughts. I grabbed the first statue I could find from Pixabay, with no other intent except to represent the Confederacy in its entirety. I do believe the stone ghosts of our past should be placed in museums, but that starts getting into the political aspects of the subject. ❤

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      1. You are so welcome, Colleen. Btw. I am studying again (phototherapy – healing plants) and last weekend we spent in the woods and talked about the natural spirits and the spiritual side of the plants. I couldn’t see them but definitely feel the presence of the fairies. It was wonderful 💖

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      2. That’s amazing, Erika! I feel the land spirits around me as well. I like the healing plants and need to find ways to grow to use some of them. It’s so HOT here. 113 degrees F. and my poor garden struggles. ❤

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      3. Oh, wow! That’s truly hot! I know what you mean with growing your own healing plants. But you are having other healing plants in front of your door which fit exactly your region and needs. Nature is so perfectly organized 💖

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  1. We need to remember the past and learn from it. We do not have to honor false idols of stone or otherwise.
    Just read that a Ball Team is changing it’s name possibly to Red Hawks…

    Respect is a two way street. We need to help those in need, but not be continually blamed for those who may or may not have been our ancestors. What was common or acceptable in one time does not have to carry over especially if it is just plain wrong.

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