“Michigan’s Grip on Spring,” #Sijo, #NaPoWritMo

Day 20 NaPoWritMo: This is an unusual syllabic form. I found myself writing sentences… I’m not sure I like that style… but here is what a Sijo is according to the guide:

Sijo are written in three lines, each averaging 14-16 syllables for a total of 44-46 syllables. Each line is written in four groups of syllables that should be clearly differentiated from the other groups, yet still, flow together as a single line. When written in English, sijo may be written in six lines, with each line containing two-syllable groupings instead of four. Additionally, as shown in the example below, liberties may be taken (within reason) with the number of syllables per group as long as the total syllable count for the line remains the same. However, it is strongly recommended that the third line consistently begins with a grouping of three syllables.

thesejongculturalsociety.org

The first line is usually written in a 3-4-4-4 grouping pattern and states the theme of the poem, where a situation is generally introduced.

The second line is usually written in a 3-4-4-4 pattern (similar to the first) and is an elaboration of the first line’s theme or situation (development).

The third line is divided into two sections. The first section, the counter-theme, is grouped as 3-5, while the second part, considered the conclusion of the poem, is written as 4-3. The counter-theme is called the ‘twist,’ which is usually a surprise in meaning, sound, or other device.


When will the cold weather end? The bitter wind yields no answer.
Michigan holds a tight grip on spring. It's ready when it's ready.
Lacy snowflakes twirl and dance. Keep your shovels handy!

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

I managed to stay within the 44 syllables. I’m sure there is more to this form than I’ve shared here:

Learn about Sijo HERE.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

22 thoughts on ““Michigan’s Grip on Spring,” #Sijo, #NaPoWritMo

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