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Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention(s), No. 140, “Light & Dark,” #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and any honorable mention poetry from last week’s challenge. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Once again you all submitted poetry that filled my heart with joy!

Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. It would mean so much if you could stop by and say hello! ❤

The Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen D. Avery as the Poet of the Week for her Nonet poem featured below. The word, nonet represents a group of 9 performers or instruments, so it’s safe to say this is one of those poetic forms inspired by music. This form compliments D’s theme of bird song. Read this poem out loud. It flows with a pleasing lyrical rhythm.

Not sure how to write a Nonet poem? Find out more Here. Corrine Rodrigues shares a fabulous tutorial on How to Write a Nonet Poem.

“Song Lines,” #Nonet, by D. Avery


Birds cast song lines towards eastern hills
exalt among effulgent leaves
celebrating golden dawn
Exhorting me to rise
emerge from sleep’s shade
step forth, wings stretched
Cast my voice
skyward;
fly.

© 2019 D. Avery

Honorable Mention Poetry

I really enjoyed Bob Fairfield’s synonyms in the following Shadorma. His poem contains a creepiness that it quite delightful! Plus… he used a Shadorma which really accents his theme.

“They Lurk Unseen,” #Shadorma by Bob Fairfield

In unlit
corners, shadows creep
silently,
cold fingers
search for that which ends their life,
illumination

© 2019 Bobby Fairfield

I also enjoyed Joe M’s Haiku. The word, “skyglow” describes that special time betwixt and between – when light and dark hover together. His words capture mother nature’s pallet perfectly! Look out for the good neighbors – they could be out and about! ❤

“Light & Dark,” #Haiku, by Joe M.

between day and night
skyglow fades and shadow spreads
two worlds share the land

© 2019 Joe M.

Stay tuned for the new challenge post tomorrow!

“Shadow Play,” Double #Cinquain

This week for my weekly poetry challenge I wanted to write a Double Cinquain. I used the word, daybreak for light, and shadows for dark.

I promised Jane Dougherty some photos of the desert and the surrounding area. As you will see, building in this area has accelerated, limiting my view of the desert. I used to be able to walk to the edge of the desert.

The first image to the lower left is the front of my house. The next image to the right is my Faery Tree representing the Celtic Tree of Life and the Great Glyph of the Sidhe. This tree is a black trunked Mesquite and native to the area. The rest of the trees in my back garden are Palo Verde (thornless) also native to the area. I’ve brought in as many natural elements as I could to please the land spirits and the good neighbors.

The spiral around the tree represents the Great Glyph of the Sidhe, which is great for connecting to the land and beings of Faery. The labyrinthian spiral provides a simple method for communicating and visiting the land of Faery. The glyph can work both ways, opening the way for beings to also visit you. This spiral was a must have for my pagan garden. Read more here.

The last two photos are from today’s morning walk. I love the way the light and dark of the shadows shimmer in the desert heat. The last photo is looking off into the distance from higher ground in my housing area. You can see the White Tank Mountains along the horizon.

That light-play of shadows inspired my double Cinquain below.

Shadow Play

Daybreak—
shadows holdfast
to the gathering light
clinging to the semi-darkness
waiting
searching—
for protection
from the heat of the day
hiding until the gloaming light
returns.

© 2019 Colleen M. Chesebro

It’s 113 F. today! Stay hydrated! ❤

Conversations With Colleen: Meet Author, Vashti Quiroz-Vega, @VashtiQV

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Hello everyone! This week I’m thrilled to bring you one of my favorite award winning authors, Vashti Quiroz-Vega. I asked her to pick three or four questions from my huge list HERE which she did. But stayed tuned… Vashti and I have a candid discussion behind some of the themes she explores in her books!

I love Vashti’s writing and believe me, I know what I’m talking about! I’ve read and reviewed, The Fall of Lilith. Read my review HERE. I’ve also read and reviewed, Son of the Serpent. Read that review HERE.

Please meet my guest author, Vashti Quiroz-Vega, who is also an accomplished poet.

Author, Vashti Quiroz-Vega

Vashti Quiroz-Vega is a writer of Fantasy, Horror, and Thriller. Since she was a kid she’s always had a passion for writing and telling stories. It has always been easier for her to express her thoughts on paper.

She enjoys reading almost as much as she loves to write. Some of her favorite authors are Stephen King, Michael Crichton, Anne Rice, J.R.R. Tolkien, J.K. Rowling and George R. R. Martin.

She enjoys making people feel an array of emotions with her writing. She likes her audience to laugh one moment, cry the next and clench their jaws after that.

When she isn’t building extraordinary worlds and fleshing out fascinating characters, she enjoys spending time with her husband JC and her Pomeranian Scribbles who is also her writing buddy.

Amazon Author Page

Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for this opportunity to share my books. I’m really looking forward to our chat.

I’m thrilled to learn more about you, Vashti. I’ve loved your Angel Series books, and I know you also have a new novella out. I’ll share more about that later.

Sounds good. Ask away. I’m happy to share.

Your Angel Series books deal with some dark subject matter. Do your readers ask if you Are a devil worshiper or Satanist?

Absolutely not. My stories are not about the devil, he happens to be a character in my stories but the stories are not about him and even if they were it wouldn’t mean I was a Satanist.

Not that it really matters, but Do you believe in God? The devil?

I believe in God and angels, so I believe that just like there are good entities there must also be evil ones. How can people like Ted Bundy, Tsutomu Miyazaki, Jack the Ripper, Ahmad Suradji, Adolf Hitler, Andrei Chikatilo among others exist if there wasn’t a devil?

So, I have to ask… are you a witch?

Witches have gotten a bad wrap through the years. Remember the evil witch from “Hansel and Gretel” who snatches up children to eat? How about Bette Midler’s character in “Hocus Pocus”?

In real life, a witch can look like anyone else. To me a witch is simply someone who is aware of her own power and puts that power into action.

Your Angel books share some of the mythology surrounding angels. Are you a religious person?

That would depend on one’s definition of what being religious entails.  I believe in the Golden Rule, “do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. I’ve also added, “treat others like you would like others to treat your children, parents, spouse, or friend.” If you would like others to treat your children with patience and kindness, be patient and kind to other children. If you want your elderly parents or grandparents to be treated with respect and dignity, treat every elderly person you come in contact with the same way.

I believe in doing good deeds and being kind and fair.  I don’t believe that going to a church every week or every day makes one a good person. Although there are many good people who attend churches, synagogues, mosques . . . there are also many self-righteous people who wear the facade of good, caring individuals when in fact they are nothing but selfish hypocrites with their own agendas.

I have no doubt that there are many lovely churches and temples with wonderful congregations but churches and temples are merely buildings. I’ve always felt closest to God surrounded by nature.

Vashti, why do you write?

Why does a person eat, sleep, or breathe? To live. That’s the same reason I write––to live.

What is it about dark fantasy, horror, and thrillers that draw you to those genres?

These have always been the genres that I’ve been attracted to since I was a child.  We all have a dark side, dark thoughts. I believe writing dark fiction helps me purge the darkness inside me in a positive way.

Do you read only dark fiction books?

I’ve always loved reading fantasy (High, Epic, Dark), horror, thriller, and science fiction, but I have read books in other genres from time to time. However, since I joined the Rave Reviews Book Club I’ve read many books from different genres. I’m always surprised at how much I enjoy them. Some of those genres have really grown on me.

Do you associate yourself with any of your villains?

No. As a matter of fact, I have at times asked myself, what is the opposite I would do in a certain scenario, in order to determine the villain’s next move. I have done research on serial killers, tyrants, and the criminally insane in order to come up with the personalities and traits of my villains. I’m not a perfect saint but I’m also not evil.

You’ve shared with me that some readers have been offended by the way you portray angels and for writing Your take on heaven and hell. Does that bother you? What would you say to these people?

I probably wouldn’t say anything, but for the sake of the interview, I would first remind my readers that my books are not religious, non-fiction books. They are fantasy fiction. Some readers just can’t differentiate fiction, from non-fiction. They believe everything they read, and I consider that to be dangerous.

I would also tell them that if they do not like my portrayal of angels, maybe they should write their own book depicting angels in the manner they feel is right.

And lastly, I am neither the first nor the last author to write about angels and demons or to create my own version of heaven and hell. There’s “Inferno” by Dante, “Paradise Lost” by John Milton, “Eric” by Terry Pratchett, “The Screwtape Letters” by C.S. Lewis, “What Dreams May Come” by Richard Matheson and many more. I’m in good company.

Some people claim to be religious while knowing very little about their own religion. I’ve also discovered that the people that are truly religious and knowledgeable about the doctrine and scriptures of their faith don’t have a problem with my books, or any books like mine. Many readers have enjoyed books like mine because they see them for what they are––works of fiction.

I love your answer! Now, Do you believe in magic?

I believe in magick. I believe the mind is a powerful instrument and people can achieve miracles with the power of positive thinking. You may call it prayer, faith . . . People have cured themselves from incurable diseases because they thought it possible. I have experienced both the power of positive thinking as well as the power of negative thinking. Positive thinking is like a spell of protection. Magick is about raising and directing energy to fulfill your intentions.

As a writer are you a dark and moody person?

I have my dark moments like everyone else, I suppose. I do my share of brooding, but I do not consider myself a dark, moody or pessimistic person. On the contrary, I always try to see the glass half full. I have actually been accused of smiling too much or being too happy at times. I try to see the good in people because I believe there is good in most people. I don’t hold grudges. I rather confront someone who I believe has done me wrong and tell him or her how I feel because then I can move on and forget about it.

Thanks so much for stopping by for a visit, Vashti. Before I forget, what is the name of your new novella?

It’s called, Memoir of a Mad Woman. Who can explain how madness begins? Thanks for the fun interview. ❤

HOW TO CONTACT Vashti Quiroz-vega

BLOG: http://vashtiqvega.wordpress.com
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/VashtiQV
AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE: https://www.amazon.com/Vashti-Quiroz-Vega/e/B00GTXG5W4/ref=dp_byline_cont_pop_ebooks_1

k luv u bye

 Thanks for stopping by to meet Vashti! You’re going to love her books!!

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 140 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Here are your two words for this week:

Light & Dark

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! 

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the poetry from the Poet of the Month and any Honorable Mentions.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

Follow the schedule listed below:

Please do a LINK-BACK to this challenge by copying the https:// address of this post into your own.

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention(s), No. 139, #PoetsChoiceofWords

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and the honorable mention poetry that really caught my eye from last week’s challenge. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! You’ve given me some hard choices this week. I was stunned by all the beautiful poetry. I really struggled with picking a favorite. It just goes to show how accomplished your poetry has become. ❤

Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello!

The Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Pat R, from her blog, Thoughts & Entanglements, as the Poet of the Week for her Haiku poem featured below.

I love Haiku and Senryu for the brevity of words. You have to pick the right combination of words, not only for the syllable count, but also to enhance your meaning. When you find a word that does double duty and creates something unexpected, as in the word “crying,” you’ve hit pay dirt. This Haiku, in my opinion, holds a powerful meaning!

Undoing

glacier ice tumbles
in a major undoing –
onlookers cheer, gulls cry

© 2019 Pat R

An Honorable Mention goes to Sally Cronin for her double Etheree, “A Dog’s Life.” The Etheree form is used when the poet tries to create a memorable message through the required line and syllable count. Seriously, anyone who has ever owned a pet can relate to her words.

Not sure how to write an Etheree? Check it out HERE.

Sally’s dog, Sam

A Dog’s Life

Years
so brief,
but so full
of love and joy,
with fun to be had
when a dog chooses you.
Holding them close to your heart,
inhaling that sweet puppy smell,
an ancient bond is reignited,
drawing you deep into their magic world.
They take no heed of the passing of time,
nor do they see into the future.
There are crucial priorities
that have to be considered.
Walks, sleep, play and their food.
But, above all else,
they worship you
as leader
of their
pack.

©2019 Sally G. Cronin

My final Honorable Mention for this week, goes to Kerfe Roig and her Haibun/Tanka called, “Draw a Bird Day: Grackle.” Kerfe creates her own artwork too!

I really enjoyed her Haibun because I felt like I was walking along the beach with her. The Tanka compliments her prose but doesn’t repeat or explain what the prose already said. Instead, the reader is treated to another facet of her experience.

“Grackle,” by Kerfe Roig

Draw a Bird Day: Grackle

Every beach vacation comes with its own bird. One year it was mockingbirds, one year a very vocal cardinal.  One year, crows.

This year we were accompanied by grackles. They would sit on the railing of the beach house speaking in their rusty tongue, lined up like soldiers. If one turned, all turned.  Once they saw someone was paying attention they would vocalize a bit more and suddenly disappear.

On the beach they appeared ahead of my walking path and waited for me, foraging in the waves. As soon as I caught up, they flew off ahead again.

Although it’s natural to see their iridescent strutting as a variation on crows, grackles are actually part of the lark family, related also to blackbirds and orioles.

But they do have a connection to crows—all back birds are said to know magic, to live on the borders of the possible unknown.

standing on the edge
between water and shoreline,
feathers glittering,
you pause, watch me watching you–
our eyes meet through layered light

©2019 Kerfe Roig

See you tomorrow for the new challenge! ❤

Copyright Infringement and content scraping going on in cyber world.

My Sister of the Fey, D.G. Kaye, aka Debby Gies, has written a post filled with useful information for every author and blogger. Book theft is nothing new but it appears things are escalating! Have a read and learn how to protect yourself. ❤

***

Click the link below to find your blogs and books being sold illegally and know your copyright rights.

Source: Copyright Infringement and content scraping going on in cyber world.

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 139 #Poet’sChoice

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

HAPPY AUGUST! (Where did the time go?)

It’s the first challenge of the month ~ Poet’s Choice of Words!

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the poetry from the Poet of the Month and any Honorable Mentions.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ, U. S. A. so I have time to compile a post and choose the Poet of the Week

The rules are simple…

Follow the schedule listed below:

Please do a LINK-BACK to this challenge by copying the https:// address of this post into your own.

You DO NOT have to send an Email. Participants and readers will find your poetry from the links in the comments section of this post. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mentions, No. 138, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello! ❤

The Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

This week, I’ve chosen Ritu Bhathal as the Poet of the Week for her Tanka poem featured below. The first time I read this poem, I immediately noticed the last line. What a surprise! Ritu mirrors the dark and light found in all of us with. I like the play on words because it was so unexpected. This Tanka can also be read forward and backward – intensifying the meaning of her words.

Not sure how to write a Tanka poem? Find out more HERE and in this article on the Pen & the Pad.

Clear & Nature, #Tanka

Relax, Read, Book, Rest, Enjoy
Pixabay Image
It isn't simple
Judging someone's character
On a first meeting
Never judge a book, they say
By cover, more lies within

Kerfe Roig’s Haibun/Tanka is a real stunner. The prose part of this Haibun transports the reader on a magical trip. Kerfe employs her artwork in every poem she writes. The image grid below compliments her prose and the Tanka.

Remember, when writing a Haibun, the poetry should never repeat, quote, or explain the prose. The Tanka should reflect a different aspect of the prose by sharing another narrative as a microburst of detail.

I also love her creative word play. Check out: “rainbowed,” which relates to her word imagery and the grid she constructed.

AUGUST (2019), #Haibun #Tanka

autumn 2019 grid s
Kerfe Roig

Is it the sky I seize when my hand reaches out to touch the storm of rain? Or do the heavens remain behind the veil, rainbowed and unclouded, waiting for the thunderings of the gods to echo into quietude as they follow the flashes of light to the edge of the horizon?

Everything around me is covered with drops of liquid light.

Gaia, drunk with the season’s retreat, builds an improvised framework out of the movements of the moon.

I look for the line
between now and again, where
flower becomes seed–
All is stillness, dense, restless–
leaves shiver, rattled by wind.

See you for tomorrow’s challenge!

Colleen’s 2019 #Book #Reviews – “Mahoney,” by Author, Andrew Joyce, @HuckFinn76

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Title: Mahoney

Amazon Author Page: Andrew Joyce

Genres: Historical Biographical Fiction, U.S. Historical Fiction, Historical Irish Fiction

Goodreads

In the Author’s Words ~

In this compelling, richly researched novel, author Andrew Joyce tells a story of determination and grit as the Mahoney clan fights to gain a foothold in America. From the first page to the last, fans of Edward Rutherfurd and W. Michael Gear will enjoy this riveting, historically accurate tale of adventure, endurance, and hope.

In the second year of an Gorta Mhór—the Great Famine—nineteen-year-old Devin Mahoney lies on the dirt floor of his small, dark cabin. He has not eaten in five days. His only hope of survival is to get to America, the land of milk and honey. After surviving disease and storms at sea that decimate crew and passengers alike, Devin’s ship limps into New York Harbor three days before Christmas, 1849. Thus starts an epic journey that will take him and his descendants through one hundred and fourteen years of American history, including the Civil War, the Wild West, and the Great Depression.

Amazon.com

My Recommendation ~

As of fan of Joyce’s western themed novels, I couldn’t wait to read this book! “Mahoney,” chronicles the lives of three generations of men detailing the trials and tribulations of their father-son relationships bound together by a proud Irish heritage.

Part one delves into Devin Mahoney’s story. The reader learns how he immigrated from Ireland to the United States to escape the potato famine. From the perils of the ship crossing to his escape off the death ship, Devin finds America full of discrimination against his Irish heritage. Times are tough, but Devin has the drive of ten men. He vows to become a success in this new land.

Andrew Joyce depicts the details of Devin’s journey with precision and skill, leaving nothing to the imagination. Be prepared for your senses to explode from the detailed descriptions. I found many of these chapters emotionally charged and filled with some of Joyce’s best writing to date.

I must add that the use of Epistolary communication in this section is one of my favorite literary forms. Joyce spares no emotions in his raw depictions of the Civil War.

Part two shares the life of Dillon, Devon’s son who sets out on a journey to the American West. What he finds is every young man’s dream. He joins a cattle drive as a cook and learns how to become a cowboy. Eventually, he takes on the title of U.S. Marshall – even hunting down a few criminals. In California, Dillon strikes it big in the oil business.

In part three, we meet David Mahoney, a spoiled, self-centered young man, the product of his father’s and grandfather’s successes. David’s story holds the most hope as the reader witnesses his collapse into poverty. In many ways, David ends up where his grandfather began. David is forced to grapple with the realities of life in the 1920s. From the soup lines of the Great Depression to the racial strife of the deep South, David finds himself and the soul of the Mahoney clan.

Joyce produces strong characters with dialog that plunks the reader in the middle of the action. Also, look for the many historical references liberally sprinkled throughout this novel. As a nation built from the blood, sweat, and tears of immigrants, this book should remind us all of who we are as Americans.

My Rating ~

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*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

About the Author ~

Andrew Joyce left home at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written seven books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Other books by Andrew Joyce

Amazon Author Page

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How to Connect with Author, Andrew Joyce

Twitter: @HuckFinn76 

Facebook: Andrew Joyce (Yellowhair1850)

Connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com

And read some historical fiction with a western flair!
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Celebrating Lughnasadh, or Lammas

Happy Lughnasadh! Celebrate the harvest. ❤

The Sisters of the Fey

I follow the Wheel of the Year Wiccan (Celtic) Sabbats which celebrate the eternal circle of life – birth, death, and rebirth. These holidays mix well with my Buddhist path and also that of Faery Wicca.

There are eight Sabbats, and they follow the changing seasons of our year always in sync with nature. This cycle represents the continuing saga of life, death, and rebirth of the god and the fertility of the goddess.

Agriculture figures prominently in this calendar with the four major festivals of Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane, and Lughnasadh (Lammas). The minor Sabbats include the solar festivals of the equinoxes and solstices, Yule, Ostara, Litha, and Mabon.

The midpoint of the four seasons is where I celebrate the major Sabbats. The beginning of each season is when I celebrate the minor Sabbats.

Our next festival occurs on August 2nd and is called…

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