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WORD CRAFT: PROSE & POETRY, THE ART OF CRAFTING SYLLABIC POETRY IS NOW AVAILABLE IN PAPERBACK

I’m thrilled to announce that the print version of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry is now available on Amazon. The last week has been a wild ride! I did my best to keep the costs low enough for everyone to purchase the book. Please enjoy! ❤

Are you ready to learn how to craft Japanese and American poetry? Consider this book the first step on your journey to learning the basics of how to craft syllabic poetry. Inside, you will discover many new forms, syllable combinations, and interpretations of the different Japanese and American forms and structures of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, renga/solo renga, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, the cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry.

So… what are you waiting for? Let’s craft syllabic poetry together!

Let’s celebrate!

D.G.Kaye’s Sunday Book Review – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry by Colleen Chesebro

Many thanks to Debby Gies for the fabulous review of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. ❤

🍂Word Craft: Prose & Poetry🍂

D.G. Kaye wrote a lovely review for Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. I’d appreciate it if you stop by and read the rest of the review. Please share. Thank you.

My 5 Star Review:

If you’re a lover of poetry and are interested in learning how to write syllabic poetry, or even just as a reader to discover all that’s involved in writing in the various styles of syllabic poetry, this is the book for you. Yes, there are plenty of books written on the subject for sure, but this author has a gift of born ‘teaching’. Her tutorials on how to, as well as great direction in explanations and wonderful use of examples allow us to clearly see what the author is explaining.

Syllabic poetry encompasses various styles and syllabic counts with succinct descriptions, from both the English and Japanese style of writing Haiku. The author explains the differences…

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#TankaTuesday – Mabon Dreams, #tanka #prose

Image by Lolame from Pixabay

The smell of wet leaves and dew always reminds me that the Autumnal Equinox or Mabon is not far away. Known as the pagan Thanksgiving, this year on September 22, 2021, I’ll pay my respects to the darkness of Autumn. During Mabon, I honor the spirit world. I associate the Greek goddess Demeter with the autumn harvest, as it was her grief at losing her daughter that turned the earth from lush abundance to barren cold.

The days are now divided equally between day and night. It’s a time to give thanks to the waning sunlight. This is a time of balance when I enjoy the fruits of my personal harvests. The seeds I planted in spring have now come to fruition. I recognize my successes and let go of the things that did not serve me well the last twelve months. As the Wheel of the year ends, I set my intentions to end terrible relationships. I let go of unhealthy habits or self-destructive beliefs.

twilight rain lingers
cooling dark forest shadows
the sweet goddess chants
a symphony of death dreams...
the scent of crushed rose petals

© Colleen M. Chesebro

How to Celebrate Mabon

Think you can’t write poetry? Join me, and learn some tips and tricks in writing syllabic poetry. Find the book on Amazon: mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry.

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews: “Ever Rest,” by Roz Morris, @Roz_Morris

Featuring Your Next Weekend Read!

From the Author

Twenty years ago, Hugo and Ash were on top of the world. As the acclaimed rock band Ashbirds they were poised for superstardom. Then Ash went missing, lost in a mountaineering accident, and the lives of Hugo and everyone around him were changed forever. Irrepressible, infuriating, mesmerizing Ash left a hole they could never hope to fill. Two decades on, Ash’s fiancée Elza is still struggling to move on, her private grief outshone by the glare of publicity. The loss of such a rock icon is a worldwide tragedy. Hugo is now a recluse in Nepal, shunning his old life. Robert, an ambitious session player, feels himself both blessed and cursed by his brief time with Ashbirds, unable to achieve recognition in his own right. While the Ashbirds legend burns brighter than ever, Elza, Hugo and Robert are as stranded as if they were the ones lost in the ice. How far must they go to come back to life? A lyrical, page-turning novel in the tradition of Dear Edward by Ann Napolitano, Ever Rest asks how we carry on after catastrophic loss. It will also strike a chord with fans of Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings and Taylor Jenkins Reid’s Daisy Jones for its people bonded by an unforgettable time; fans of Ann Patchett’s Bel Canto, for music as a primal and romantic force; and Jon Krakauer’s Into Thin Air for the deadly and irresistible wildernesses that surround our comfortable world.

Amazon.com

My Recommendation

In Ever Rest, we explore the partnership between mountain climbing and rock music, which creates an unforgettable novel. The book revolves around Ashten Geddard, the rock star whose life and death changes the futures of his girlfriend Elza, and the other two band members, Hugo and Robert, after he plunges to his death on Mt. Everest. Ash’s body rests within the mountain’s icy grip. Twenty years later, the trio still struggle to make sense of his death.

We discover how Ash and Hugo met as young boys, how they lived through their personal family traumas, and how neither one seemed to be a complete whole without the other. From the beginning, I sensed Ash needed Hugo more than Hugo needed him. Ash possessed the charisma, the glue that brings the fans in, while Hugo proves to be the musical genius behind the Ashbirds rock group.

The novel is a character study of the lives left behind after Ash’s death. The novel shares Hugo’s journey of coming to grips with his guilt over Ash’s death, and becoming the man he always wanted to be. But the novel is Elza’s story, as well as Robert’s story, too. The threads of Ash’s death weave together each character’s narrative into the present. How will they move forward?

Now, each corpse recovered from Mt. Everest propels the characters into their own personal hell, wondering if this body will be his remains. I found it interesting that even in death, Ash commanded the show.

When an investor shows up to reunite the remaining members of the Ashbirds, Hugo finds himself drawn back into the rock scene one last time. Even Elza, now an artist, is pulled into the emotional whirlwind of the Ashbirds musical aura… until they find a corpse on Mt. Everest that only Hugo can identify. What will he find?

“Ever Rest” was not my typical read, but I found the characters to be solid and intriguing personalities. The more I learned about Ash, the less I like him, but that’s typical with a larger-than-life character. This book held my attention and I couldn’t wait to read more to find out what happened next.

If you’re looking for something different, this is the book for you. The story is engaging with characters that come across as genuine people, and there’s nothing fake about them. Something I would think rare in the world of rock stars. The plot is full of twists and turns—enough to keep you reading long into the night! I received this book as a gift from the author. I enjoyed the novel so much; I had to share my thoughts.

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 If you have your book listed on BookBub, I will add my review there also!  Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro) Let me know in the comments if you follow me so I can follow you!

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Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a tiny amount from qualifying purchases. If you purchase from the Amazon.com link above, I earn a small commission to fund my reading habit. Amazon will not charge you extra, and you’ll keep me supplied in books that I can review. It’s a win-win situation for everyone.

Eugi’s Weekly Prompt: Journey

Your Weekly Prompt – Journey – Sept. 2, 2021

I’ve jumped into Eugi’s prompt this week. She says: “This prompt will be mostly unmoderated. Please keep it family friendly. Disrespectful and inappropriate comments will be removed. This needs to be a safe and fun space for all. There will be no Roundup.

Go where the prompt leads you and publish a post on your own blog that responds to the prompt. To participate, link your blog to mine with a pingback. To do a pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTPS:// address of my post) and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of the URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s prompt. It can be any variation of the prompt and/or image. 

time traveler—
the long journey home
spirit calls

© Colleen M. Chesebro

Smorgasbord Book Reviews Rewind – Word Craft: Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry by Colleen M. Chesebro

What a lovely surprise to find a reshare of Sally Cronin’s review of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry. I’m thrilled!

If you think you can’t write poetry… you haven’t tried syllabic poetry! Join us for #TankaTuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com each week. It’s time to spread your creative wings! ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

As a participant in Colleen Chesebro’s weekly Tuesday Tanka Challenge, I have discovered so many different forms of syllabic poetry and come to love creating poems in these formats. I reviewed the collection in May this year.

About the book

Are you ready to learn how to craft Japanese and American poetry? Consider this book the first step on your journey to learning the basics of how to craft syllabic poetry. Inside, you will discover many new forms, syllable combinations, and interpretations of the different Japanese and American forms and structures of haiku, senryu, haiga, tanka, renga/solo renga, gogyohka, haibun, tanka prose, the cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, nonet, and shadorma poetry.

So… what are you waiting for? Let’s craft syllabic poetry together!

My review for the guide and poetry collection May 19th 2021

I have enjoyed poetry from childhood and would write stories in verse from an early…

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“Summer’s End,” #tankaprose #TankaTuesday

Our Tanka Tuesday challenge this week is to write some tanka prose. We typically write tanka prose in the 5-7-5-7-7 or a s/l/s/l/l five-line syllabic structure. Tanka prose should contain a title. There is one basic requirement in writing tanka prose: one paragraph, and one tanka.

There are two basic forms in classic tanka prose: Preface (explanation) and the Poem Tale (episodic narration). Tanka prose does not rhyme.

Preface (explanation): Is where the prose explains the basic information in the narrowest sense. It is a factual summary of the experience. Usually, you write one prose paragraph and one tanka.

Poem Tale (episodic narration): The poem tale/episodic narration is a more formal structure where you share a more personal experience through your prose. In general, the tanka poem is always the center on which the narrative episode (prose) comes from. Write your tanka first. With this type of tanka prose, the prose often shares a beginning, middle, and an end, as if it were a short story. You can have one or more tanka within the prose.

Below, I’ve crafted an episodic narration:

“Summer’s End”

During this morning’s walk, I felt the first hint of Autumn. The trees looked bedraggled by last week’s heat wave. The leaves, like an old hat, looked dull against the backdrop of a blue scrap of sky.

summer's passage creeps
through the leaves, colors dreary
Autumn hears the call...
red and gold hues dress the trees
a farewell to summertime

A sound in the trees overhead caught my attention. I watched as the sleek tan-colored body of a Sandhill Crane rose from the nearby edge of the pond. Cranes are the messengers of the gods, and even in Michigan, such a sighting is rare. It is said, if you see a crane; it is to remind ourselves of the passage of time and our mortality.

the wheel of time turns
spinning toward the future
use your time—wisely...
love longer, laugh hard, hate less,
and learn to forgive yourself

I stood at the edge of the pond, a witness to the passage of time, until the buzz of mosquitoes reminded me I should be on my way. Time marches on…

© Colleen M. Chesebro

Episodic narration tanka prose is one of the most freeing forms to write. In this piece above, I was careful to stay true to the construction of the tanka portions by creating two meanings separated by the pivot in line three of each tanka. This is where you take the first three lines of your tanka to create one meaning. Then, take line 3, 4, and 5 to create the second meaning to your poem.

summer's passage creeps
through the leaves, colors dreary
Autumn hears the call...
Autumn hears the call...
red and gold hues dress the trees
a farewell to summertime

I kept both messages in this tanka similar because I was showing the passage of time. This is the theme of the piece.

The prose shares my experience during this morning’s walk. I made sure and used a metaphor in the first paragraph to help set the mood. Later, I used the Sandhill Crane taking off in flight as a metaphor for the passage of time. Tanka prose is where you can get poetic by including metaphors and similes. If you don’t know what those are, look up their definitions.

The prose and poetry combine to read like a short story with a beginning, middle, and an ending. Autumn, signifies the dying time of year before winter’s long slumber. The passage of time is a favorite theme in Japanese poetry. I love autumn… it’s my favorite time of the year.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

Think you can’t write poetry? Join me, and learn some tips and tricks in writing syllabic poetry. Find the book on Amazon: mybook.to/WordCraftProsePoetry.

Here’s a recent review from D. L. Finn on Amazon.com:

In “Word Craft: Prose & Poetry” Ms. Chesebro has written a detailed guide of syllabic poetry. There’s history, instructions on writing the poem, several examples, and then the information is recapped for each form. Section one of the book offers Japanese Syllabic Poetry. Here are the chapters covered, Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Haibun, Tanka Prose, and Renga. Then the second section is the American Syllabic Poetry. The types covered here are Crapsey Cinquain and all variations, Etheree, Nonnet, and Shadorma. Although I’ve spent years writing free verse poetry, I’ve come to love syllabic poems too, thanks to Ms. Chesebro. This is a fantastic guide to learn about syllabic poetry and how to write them. I will buy the paperback version for a quick reference to a style I want to try or simply refresh my memory on writing a certain type of poem. I highly recommend this guide for all poets who love this style or would like to learn about it.

“When Pigs Fly,” 99-Word Story, #flashfiction

The Carrot Ranch August 26, 2021, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about a flight of pigs. It can be farm or fantasy-related. The idea can be a tale, poem or memory. You can use the phrase as an expression. Go where the prompt leads!

Respond by August 31, 2021

Image by No-longer-here from Pixabay

“Come one, come all, the circus is in town,” bellowed the bearded lady.

Me and Jude stood at the side of the road and gawked at the circus wagons. The calliope played with such fervor we had to cover our ears from the noise. We’d never smelled so many smells at the same time.

When the wagon of monkeys stopped, the critters screeched and pointed, like we were the funny ones.

“What do you think, Jude? Is your ma gonna let you go?”

“I hope so. Last year when I asked her all she said was, “When pigs fly!””

© Colleen M. Chesebro

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews: “A Ghost & His Gold,” by Roberta Eaton Cheadle, @bakeandwrite

Featuring Your Next Weekend Read!

From the Author

“After Tom and Michelle Cleveland move into their recently built, modern townhouse, their housewarming party is disrupted when a drunken game with an Ouija board goes wrong and summons a sinister poltergeist, Estelle, who died in 1904.

Estelle makes her presence known in a series of terrifying events, culminating in her attacking Tom in his sleep with a knife. But, Estelle isn’t alone. Who are the shadows lurking in the background – one in an old-fashioned slouch hat and the other, a soldier, carrying a rifle?

After discovering their house has been built on the site of one of the original farms in Irene, Michelle becomes convinced that the answer to her horrifying visions lie in the past. She must unravel the stories of the three phantoms’ lives, and the circumstances surrounding their untimely deaths during the Second Anglo Boer War, in order to understand how they are tied together and why they are trapped in the world of ghosts between life and death. As the reasons behind Estelle’s malevolent behaviour towards Tom unfold, Michelle’s marriage comes under severe pressure and both their lives are threatened.”

Amazon.com

My Recommendation

“A Ghost and His Gold,” by Robbie Cheadle, was a pleasant surprise. The author takes us to South Africa, where Tom and Michelle Cleveland have recently purchased a house in the town of Irene. During a housewarming party and a chance encounter with a Ouija board, readers are drawn back to the era of the second Boer War where Great Britain’s army tried to regain what it lost in the first war. Somewhere along the way, the lure of gold and riches sets the stage for a ghost adventure like no other!

The Ouija board proves to be the catalyst that opens the door to the past. Michelle is the most receptive to the spirit world. When the others shrug off the temperature changes and the exploding bottles, Michelle senses the ghostly presence.

The next day, she researches the local history of the area and specifically the house they live in. Michelle makes some interesting discoveries, not only about the house but about Tom and how he lived the year before she met him. By the time Estelle (a supernatural ghost) makes her presence known, Michelle and Tom have collapsed into a paranormal hell.

Writing about ghosts can be tricky, and this author handles the paranormal aspects of the book well. Supernatural ghosts always have a past agenda to work through. They remain on the earthly plane until their personal trauma or unfinished business is resolved and they can pass into the light. Estelle, the ghost, makes Tom the target of her ire as the reader witnesses his descent into madness.

The historical aspects of the book are as well presented as the paranormal aspects. Cheadle retells the bloody horror of the Second Boer War in all its graphic detail. This history cements the different aspects of the story joining the past and the present into a cyclical supernatural event.

In the end, the story is really about family. We learn the story of the Boer farmer, Pieter, and his daughter Estelle’s tragic life. Estelle’s story is truly unforgettable. Be mindful that emotional abuse and trauma within family relationships could trigger some readers.

This book was so much more than a ghost story. It’s a complex read, dealing with many themes that mirror the present-day, including racism, rape, family issues, and much more. I struggled with my feelings throughout the book, and it felt like I had embarked on a roller coaster of emotion. However, I will not forget the characters, or what I learned about the Second Boer War or the history of Africa. I found the book to be an excellent read!

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 If you have your book listed on BookBub, I will add my review there also!  Click HERE to follow me! (Colleen M. Chesebro) Let me know in the comments if you follow me so I can follow you!

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I also share my reviews in the Literary Diva’s Library on Facebook. Click HERE to apply for membership.

Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate, I earn a tiny amount from qualifying purchases. If you purchase from the Amazon.com link above, I earn a small commission to fund my reading habit. Amazon will not charge you extra, and you’ll keep me supplied in books that I can review. It’s a win-win situation for everyone.

“A Mother’s Song,” Crapsey cinquain trio, #TankaTuesday

For our #TankaTuesday challenge this week, Vashti Q. Vega, selected an excellent theme—a lullaby. I wasn’t sure what I would write, so I just let the words flow… don’t think of this as something sad. Instead, think of it as good memories.

My children and grandchildren are all grown and scattered all over America. They all have their own lives and we don’t connect with them often. It’s their choice. Blended families have different issues to cope with and some things just are what they are. Every once in a while I unpack those feelings… then, I put them back again. This was one of those times. ❤

"A Mother's Song"

whisper
sweet slumber songs
to this dear babe of mine
let fairy kisses grant wishes
dream deep

think of
the blessed days 
wrapped in my loving arms
holding you closest to my heart
dear lamb

ancient
memories call—
when you were oh so small,
I miss those days when you needed
me most...

© Colleen M. Chesebro
Now, I’m a CAT mom!