#Colorado Dreams – A #Haibun

Welcome to my contribution to my Weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of past & future.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: GeniusQuotes.net

The meadow fairy hovered in the crisp air. Her wings beat the air in a slow rhythm – transparent, barely discernable in the evening light. Her body was long and lean much like the tall grasses she hid in. Her blue eyes captured my attention. In an instant, I knew she was a Meliae fairy nymph. Each of the seven nymph clans was represented by a color from the rainbow which manifested in the pigmentation of their eyes. With that realization, I knew something magical had possessed me.

Colorado dreams –
blending my future and past,
whispers of our fate.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

I found this picture on Facebook. This is the starting point for what my meadow fairy will look like.

See you June 6th! ❤

GUESS WHAT? I’VE BEEN NOMINATED AS THE BEST PAL BLOG OF 2017, BY THE ANNUAL BLOGGER’S BASH. HAVE YOU VOTED? CLICK HERE TO VOTE NOW. THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT. ❤

Marje shares her thoughts and experiences in the form of a Haibun to the Manchester, UK terror attack yesterday. I was deeply moved by her words and my love and prayers go out to the people affected by this tragedy. ❤

K Y R O S M A G I C A

052217_1924_colleenswee1

I had a disturbed sleep last night waking up at 5am. I managed to get back to sleep and awoke again at 7am. I checked my twitter feed  and discovered the horrifying news about the terrorist attack in Manchester. I cried. I couldn’t cope with the sad news about another attack especially one which struck at our young people. This is cruel, beyond comprehension.  I contemplated the morning and realised how beautiful a day it was. A single bird remained atop a tree, not moving so I picked up my mobile phone and captured it. Seconds later it flew away. If only those young people could have flown away. If only that man hadn’t done what he did.

unnamed (17)

How ironic. The sun shone, but how could this be? How are we to continue when such atrocities happen? I suppose the answer is we have no choice; we have to, or the terrorists will…

View original post 200 more words

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 35 – PAST & FUTURE by Marjorie Mallon of Kyrosmagica

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 35 – PAST & FUTURE

A new badge for spring

THERE WILL BE NO POETRY CHALLENGE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 30TH. I WILL BE ON VACATION IN THE MOUNTAINS OF UTAH WITH NO WIFI! The next challenge will be on Tuesday, June 6th.

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

Image credit: BrainyQuote.com

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

Are you new to writing the Haiku in English poetry form? Please read my page, How to Write a Haiku in English.

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click HERE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 34th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – Power & Allure: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE – Ladyleemanila

The Trappings – Reena Saxena

How I look at it – Reena Saxena

Sun power – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleens weekly #poetry #challenge : power & allure tanka | Two on a Rant

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #34 Power & Allure | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #34 Power & Allure

A New Poetry Challenge – [135/365] – Rambling Kori

questions unanswered | rivrvlogr

Power & Allure | thoughts and entanglements

Power (haiku #16) – Stories

Everything You Need (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Colleen’s Poetry Challenge – 34 – The Bag Lady

Power & Allure – A Haiku/Nosaintaugustine

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #34 Power & Allure (Tanka)/Stuff & What If

Tanka – Power & Allure | radhikasreflection

SIMPLE PLEASURES | Sweet aroma

Stooping to conquer – Playing with words

A Haiku Micro-anthology: Dew – Mick E Talbot Poems

Self | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

“The Return” – A Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Haibun: My dream to fly – My Feelings My Freedom

Lunar Rays | method two madness

Echoes from the Before Time: Haibun | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

This week’s Poet of the Week is Rugby 483, from her blog called, The Bag Lady. She wrote a haiku that hit the spot for me. The brevity of the words she chose told the story. Here’s what I loved about it:

Close your eyes after you have read the Haiku. Can you see your version of the woman standing there projecting absolute power in her beauty and allure? That is what a Haiku does for me. It captures a moment in time and flashes a quick image in my mind.

She was unaware

Of her absolute allure

Giving her power

© 2017 Rugby483, The Bag Lady

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PAST & FUTURE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

GUESS WHAT? I’VE BEEN NOMINATED AS THE BEST PAL BLOG OF 2017, BY THE ANNUAL BLOGGER’S BASH. HAVE YOU VOTED? CLICK HERE TO VOTE NOW. THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT. ❤

Smorgasbord Poetry – Which Cake? by Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, from Robbie’s Inspiration, is so clever. Check out her poetry and her cakes! ❤

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Today Robbie Cheadle ponders the question about what cake to bake for her husband and his impending birthday. There is already so much baking going on in the Cheadle household that coming up with something special to surprise him is going to be a challenge.

Which cake?

My hubby’s birthday is coming
I must make him a cake,
It really hard to decide,
Which one I should bake.

Should it be chocolate
Decorated with cherries,
Or a meringue tower
With cream and wild berries.

A gingerbread house,
Covered in bright sweets,
A selection of pastries,
Filled with sweetmeats.

Something quite tart,
Like lemon and lime.
Or a baked cheesecake,
With tastes quite sublime.

Something quite simple,
Like scones, jam and cream.
Or a yummy treacle pudding,
Cooked in a basin, over steam.

So many delicious choices,
What would he like best?
I’ll conjure up a surprise,
And put it to…

View original post 226 more words

“The Return” – A Haibun

New Badge! Made on Canva.com

Welcome to my contribution to my Weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of power & allure.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.


Image credit: Pinterest – Quotes about Poetry

I used ‘beguiles’ for allure, and I kept the word power. Remember, synonyms are encouraged.

“The Return”


The heat from the noonday sun reflected off the low water filling the Arroyo. The glare blinded me, and I raised my hand to shield my eyes from the strength of the brilliant light. I step closer to the edge of the gully careful not to slip on the wet pebbles. Towering cottonwood trees with trunks twisted by the prairie winds, cluster near the bend of the creek. Leaves rustle in the gentle breeze. A sound catches my attention, and I glance over my shoulder.

There, perched on a boulder, is a lark bunting. The bird stares at me, and I stare back, bewitched by the blue-black color of its body and wings. I experience an uncanny feeling of déjà vu, and my heart beats in a quick staccato rhythm. The realization floods my senses, and I feel faint. Precious lark bunting, I knew you in another place and time.

Haunting memories –
bound by the power of love
‘tween mother and child.
The meadow fairy beguiles
as a new challenge awaits.

My calcite pendant recognizes you, too. It explodes by flashing a kaleidoscope of rainbow colors across the sky. My heart bursts with love and tears stream down my face. I remember you. I held you close inside my heart hoping to see you again.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

See you next week!

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

Image credit: Pinterest – Mother Nature Quotes

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

Are you new to writing the Haiku in English poetry form? Please read my page, How to Write a Haiku in English.

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 33rd POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CLEAN & SHARP: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Uncluttered – Reena Saxena

Elevation – Reena Saxena

Hunters – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP – Ladyleemanila

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP – Mick E Talbot Poems

Tanka on haiku – questioning the rules of beauty | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP | K Y R O S M A G I C 

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY CHALLENGE # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP/Two on a Rant

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #33 Clean & Sharp | Annette Rochelle Aben

Sepiosexual – Playing with words

Hunter and Prey (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Artista (haiku #14) – Stories

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge | willowdot21

Clean & Sharp | thoughts and entanglements

The Letter | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Clean & Sharp | The Syllabub Sea

Firebird | method two madness

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP #haiku @ColleenChesebro | Rambling Lisa’s Book Reviews

Tanka: Supremacy – My Feelings My Freedom

This week’s Poet of the Week is Merril from her blog called, Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings. Merril has been writing Haibun that reads like a dramatic short story. The Letter is an excellent example of a Haibun. Here’s what I loved about it:

  1. The prose at the beginning tells a story. It is a snapshot in time as the woman reads the letter and deals with the emotions it evokes within her. It is an emotional read.
  2. The haiku at the end is haunting. You feel the death of the man lost at sea – he is the ghost drifting in the moonlight. Nice!

The Letter

I open the letter, read the words again and again. But they don’t change. They recount the battle and your acts of bravery. They describe the sudden storm, a tempest that battered your ship against the rocks, as you were journeying home to me. I had warned you not to go. I told you of my dream, where the storm clouds gathered and flew like demons, covering the moon, and you appeared beside me, cold and still, dripping, smelling of the sea, smelling of decay. I felt the pain then, clean and sharp in my breast. You laughed at my fears, called me Cassandra. Perhaps I am, for you did not believe me. I look at the ring on my finger and think of this other love-pledge you have given me, feel him flutter-kick in my womb. A son. He’ll be born in the spring. I will tell him about you.

ghosts drift in moonlight

clouds obscure the pale glowing

drops like silver tears

Johannes Vermeer, “Woman in Blue Reading a Letter,” [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

© 2017 Merril, Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: POWER & ALLURE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

 POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

HSCSF ad with haiku

Haiku Friday+ – Fairy Whisperer

My dear friend, Vashti Vega featured me on her blog today. AND, she wrote a fairy Haiku! Many thanks, for making my Friday so special. ❤

The Writer Next Door

Hello everyone and welcome to The Writer Next Door!

I’m excited because I have a very special guest today, Colleen Chesebro the Fairy Whispererherself! It has been a great honor and pleasure knowing this sweet lady for the last couple of years. Colleen is a talented author and poet and a great supporter of her fellow writers, poets and bloggers. She is a veteran of the U. S. Air Force and a retired bookkeeper. She holds an Associate Degree in Business Administration, and another Associate Degree in the Arts, which she uses to blend her love of writing with her passion for all things creative. Her first book, The Swamp Fairy is the first installment of her series The Heart Stone Chronicles.

Amazon-author-The Writer Next Door-Poetry-Haiku_Friday-fairy-guest blogger-Vashti Q

You can get a free preview of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairyhere.

The Writer Next Door-fairy-VashtiQ-Poetry-Colleen Chesebro-The Swamp Fairy-haiku-book Available on Amazon

In Colleen’s words . . . 

My name is Colleen…

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Tanka on haiku – questioning the rules of beauty

Sue shares her thoughts on writing the Japanese poetry forms. I stand corrected – she brings up excellent points about diction and pronunciation in British English vs. American English. I accept that some poets write in their native language which is then translated into English. The syllable count may be off because of the differences in language. I have no problems with this. The poetry challenge was started to share our love of poetry while learning about the different forms. Please write your poetry with your particular syllable count as close to the 5/7/5 format as possible. If you are not spot on, don’t worry. Creativity should be allowed to flourish. That works for me. Thank you, Sue, for sharing your thoughts. ❤

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

There are many set forms of poetic structure. Books and websites abound, setting out the rules of form and content that allow us to label our work and provide a framework in which to explore a concent. The very stringency of these forms, where rhyme schemes, syllable counts and even content are dictated give us a measure against which we can be judged, and many will judge on the slightest deviance from the accepted norm.

I enjoy writing haiku. The ‘midnight haiku’ I started publishing a couple of years ago now have become a staple feature of the blog and I think I have missed no more than a couple of days in that time to illness. I like the constraints imposed by the widely accepted ‘English form’ of the poem; seventeen syllables in a 5-7-5 pattern leave no room for extraneous thoughts, but give plenty of space to explore…

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Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

All hyper-links are in purple.

Image credit: Pinterest – Famous Poetry Quotes

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5. Read my post on How to Write a Haiku in English.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click Publicize to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work. Learn how to do a PINNED TWEET.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 30th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – LEAD & SAVE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Alleys of love – Playing with words

Learn fishing – Reena Saxena

 Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 32 – LEAD & SAVE – Ladyleemanila

 Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge 32 – LEAD & SAVE – Mick E Talbot Poems

 #Haiku# Poetry Challenge # lead & save # 32 – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 32 – LEAD & SAVE | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Spring poplars – Jane Dougherty Writes

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE # 32 – LEAD & SAVE/Two on a Rant

 The Psychopath – Reena Saxena

The Soul’s Cry – Reena Saxena

Lead & Save | The Syllabub Sea

Out of the Darkness (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

 Haiku #11 – Stories

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #32 Lead & Save/Annette Rochelle Aben

May the Fourth (be with you) | method two madness

 Sunburst | rivrvlogr

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #32 Lead & Save

Naiad | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Lead and Save – My Feelings My Freedom

Thoughts of Words

“Dreams,” a Haiku – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

 Spring Symphony | thoughts and entanglements

This week’s Poet of the Week is Hecblogger from his blog called, Playing With Words. This young man writes some fabulous love poetry, and this Haiku was outstanding. Here’s what I love about his words:

  1. No punctuation. What that means to me (it might mean something different to you) is that this Haiku is a stream of consciousness poem. The words poured out of the poet as he wrestled with his feelings about the object of his affection.
  2. These few words tell you everything you need to know about this relationship… the poet is smitten. Short, sweet, and to the point. I love it!

Alleys of Love

her eyes lead me on
treacherous alleys of love
who can save me now

© 2017 Playing with Words

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CLEAN & SHARP

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms of the words I gave you)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

050417_2045_DreamsaHai5.jpg

“Dreams,” a Haiku

Welcome to my contribution to my Weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of lead & save. Remember, synonyms are encouraged. Please read the directions on my challenge post to make sure you are following the rules for these forms of poetry.

Please read the instructions on my challenge post to make sure you are following the rules for Haiku, Haibun, and Tanka.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image Credit: BrainyQuote.com

This week, I decided to write a Haiku, called “Dreams.” I used “guides” for “lead” and “rescue” for “save.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your prose & poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

Fairy spirit guides –
rescue me from my wild dreams,
fear controls my heart.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

See you next week!

How to Create a Haiku in English

I love poetry and believe that if you start writing “good” poetry, it will help you to become a better creative writer. That being said, I also like rules in poetry. There must be some parameters that we follow to create our visual word poems. Otherwise, we are left with words that don’t convey a cohesive feeling or thought.

I’ve had a few questions on how to write the different poetry forms. I thought I would start with the Haiku first because it is one of the most powerful poem structures we have to express deep emotions. The brevity of the structure (5/7/5) causes the poet to choose their words carefully.

Haiku, according to www.edu.pe.ca “…is a Japanese verse in three lines.  Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes.”

Not using metaphors or similes is important because it is part of writing a Haiku in English. And, believe me, I am guilty of writing this form incorrectly, too.

Ahapoetry.com explains the difference lies in the number of syllables in Japanese compared to English:

“THE LENGTH AND FORM OF ENGLISH HAIKU”

“Today, many bilingual poets and translators in the mainstream North American haiku scene agree that something in the vicinity of 11 English syllables is a suitable approximation of 17 Japanese syllables, in order to convey about the same amount of information as well as the brevity and the fragmented quality found in Japanese haiku. As to the form, some American poets advocate writing in 3-5-3 syllables or 2-3-2 accented beats. While rigid structuring can be accomplished in 5-7-5 haiku with relative ease due to a greater degree of freedom provided by the extra syllables, such structuring in shorter haiku will have the effect of imposing much more stringent rules on English haiku than on Japanese haiku, thereby severely limiting its potential.”

For all sakes and purposes, writing Haiku in the abbreviated forms above just don’t carry the same impact when written in English. For my poetry challenges, we use the 5/7/5 structure.

Most Haiku are written about nature, but not all. A Haiku should share a moment of awareness (Yes! Mindfulness figures here, too) with the reader. When you read a Haiku, it should convey emotions like peace, mystery, sadness, etc. Always include words that provoke emotions in your readers.

DON’T TELL THE READER HOW YOU FEEL – SHOW THE READER HOW YOU FEEL. Here is a PDF of the Guidelines for Writing Haiku.

HOW I WRITE A HAIKU

The best way to write Haiku is to commune with nature. Get up from the computer, put down your phone, and literally go outside and experience the world.

Photography and art are another way to stimulate your creative writing genes. Many times, I like finding a photograph and letting my mind wander over the image. (Pixabay.com is a great place to find inspirational photos that are part of the public domain and free for commercial use with no attribution required).

I write down everything I see in the picture and use my five senses to record my observations.

Let’s take this image below:

Image Credit: Pixabay.com

Here are my observations about the picture:

Sun breaking through dark clouds

A road to nowhere

A fence to hold something in or out

Dark and light contrasts good and evil – shifting perceptions – changing my attitude

Green grasses stretch to infinity – the unknown?

Heavenly intervention? Expanding awareness

Enchanted by the vision of the light breaking through the clouds – looks magical

Next, I am going to select two of my observations that really hit me emotionally in the gut when I look at the image:

Dark and light contrasts good and evil – shifting perceptions

Heavenly intervention? Expanding awareness.

I play with the words and use thesaurus.com. I run my words through the poetry workshop at How Many Syllables to make sure I have the proper count of syllables: 5/7/5.

Here is what I came up with:

Shifting attitudes –

while your consciousness expands,

enchantment appears.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

There is one more thing I want to bring you attention to. I write my Haiku in English to form two complete sentences:

Shifting attitudes – while your consciousness expands.

While your consciousness expands, enchantment appears.

There are two different things happening in this Haiku. The first two lines are about change, and the very last line lets the reader know that in the midst of change we often find the magic in life. The last line is the pivot. That is where you show an opposite which creates a deeper meaning to your first thoughts.

Ronovan, from RonovanWrites, taught this Haiku writing technique on his blog. Please click the link to visit his blog. He offers a weekly Haiku challenge each Monday if you are interested.

Image credit: Pixabay.com

Spread your writing wings and engage your creative engines by writing some Haiku. Join me every Tuesday on my blog for Poetry Tuesday, where you can share your Haiku, Haibun, or Tanka poetry. Here is a link to this week’s prompt post: Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #32 – Lead & Save.

Thanks for stopping by… now back to writing Book 2 of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Meadow Fairy

Universal book link

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 32 – LEAD & SAVE

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

Image credit: Pinterest-Poem by Jim Morrison

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post. PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES OF THE POETRY FORMS. ❤

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click
PUBLICIZE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 31st POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – PEACE & TEAR: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3) HOW MANY OF YOU NOTICED THAT THE WORD “TEAR” IS A HOMOGRAPH?

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE # 31 – PEACE & TEAR/Two on a Rant

The Iconoclast – Reena Saxena

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge 31 – PEACE & TEAR – Mick E Talbot PoemsEdit

Anzac Day – an alternate view | Collages

Tanka #2 – Stories

Mother of all bombs – Playing with words

Colleen’s weekly poetry challenge#31-peace & tear – Mourning (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR – Ladyleemanila

Tanka Tuesday: Peace & Tear – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #31 Peace & Tear | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR | willowdot21

2 (Tanka): Mean & Have – Thoughts of Words

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge 31 Peace & Tear @ColleenChesebro | Rambling Lisa’s Book Reviews

“The Fairy Tree,” A #Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #31 Peace & Tear/Always a Writer

War, Peace & Tears | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Ghost in a City of Ruins: NaPoWriMo | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge 31 Peace Tear – All About Writing and more

Dream Music | method two madness

Tears (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams ** Used a homograph 😀

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #31 Peace & Tear (again)

Peaceful (Haiku) | Darkness of His Dreams

Sorrow for All | Faith Unlocked

#Tanka#Tear& peace – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

This week’s Poet of the Week is author and poet, Judy E. Martin, from Edwina’s Episodes.com. She has a book available on Amazon called, Rhymes of the Times. I love the simple message and poignant image which accompanied her Haiku. Let’s hope her words come true.

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: LEAD & SHARE

(which word is a homograph?)

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

 POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

Longing for Spring – A #Haiku

Snow crystals glisten –
beneath the vault of heaven
spring still has not sprung.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Enter the world of the swamp fairy and learn about the

Calcite fairy stone.

Available on:

Amazon Kindle

Amazon Paperback

Goodreads

Universal book link

heart you me

“The Fairy Tree,” A #Haibun

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of peace & tear. Remember, synonyms are encouraged. Please read the directions on my challenge post to make sure you are following the rules for these forms of poetry.

Please read the directions on my challenge post to make sure you are following the rules for Haiku, Haibun, and Tanka. ❤

This week, I decided to write a Haibun with a Tanka, called “The Fairy Tree.” I used “calm” for “peace” and “splitting” for “tear.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your prose & poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: Pinterest: Quotes about poetry

Scarlet skies afire
splitting the calm asunder
silence tears the morn.
Wheat heavy with the harvest
announces autumn’s glory.

I crept closer to the fairy tree which stood like a lone sentry in the middle of the field. The late summer wheat, thick with seed heads undulated like waves as I forced my way through the scratchy stalks. At the base of the tree, I gazed between the branches filled with golden leaves. The bees clustered at the opening to the apiary emitting a gentle hum which soothed my nerves.

Quietly, I watched the activity in the hive. I felt no fear and knew the bees would recognize me. I spied the queen at once. Her body was larger and heavier than the other bees. Her female workers gathered around her performing the spirit dance – an homage of sorts to their royal genealogy. Tiny black and yellow bodies twirled and clustered about the majestic mother. Myriads of lacy wings beat a gentle song remembering an ancient heritage written through the ages.

The queen had one job, and that was to lay eggs. This summer I watched as she laid over 2000 eggs a day. The drones were long gone having been evicted from the colony after they had mated with the queen. Her royal highness would have no need of the drones from here on out. She had enough sperm to last for at least five years. Their deaths had been necessary for the survival of the hive’s collective consciousness. I knew the legacy of this colony needed to survive. I had to find the answers.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

I have entered the writing zone! My fairy nymphs have summoned me, and I am working hard on the second book in The Heart Stone Chronicles series – The Meadow Fairy. Abby Forester, the Fairy Whisperer, must solve the mystery of the disappearing bees! ❤

Read: Why Are the Bees Dying?

fairy vibes

Next Tuesday for the next poetry challenge.

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 31 – PEACE & TEAR

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

THANK YOU FOR THE BIRTHDAY POETRY! TO SHOW MY APPRECIATION, I REBLOGGED YOUR POSTS. THESE WERE THE BEST PRESENTS EVER! ❤

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. All hyperlinks are purple and I’ve underlined as many as I could. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click PUBLICIZE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 30th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WISH & MAGIC: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic | Ladyleemanila

Happy Birthday, Colleen! #Tanka Tuesday – Reena Saxena

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic/Two on a Rant

Wishing – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic 2 Birthday

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic/Edwina’s Episodes

She’s still mad at me – Playing with words

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Happy Birthday Colleen | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s poetry challenge#30-wish & magic (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 – Wish & Magic/Stuff & What If?

Time Paradox: NaPoWriMo | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Magic Wings | method two madness

Desire (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Wishing (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

#Poetry challenge #30# Tanka# wish & magic – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

NaPoWriMo Day 22: Earth – My Feelings My Freedom

No Magic Answers | Faith Unlocked

Indistinguishable | Faith Unlocked

Up River/Word & Image Collages

“The Celebration” – A Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is me! I figure I can share my Haibun once a year on my birthday. I hope you will enjoy. I wrote it to honor Earth Day, which was celebrated on April 22nd, worldwide.

The Celebration – A Haibun

As the sun kisses my face, I reach my arms toward the brightness of the pale blue sky. The festival is nigh. Today is Earth Day, and I feel mother Gaia firm and fertile under the crusty snow beneath my feet. There is a coolness to the springtime breeze that drifts around me like a mist filled with ancient memories. The scent of marsh grasses fills my soul with a yearning that cannot be quenched. I feel the old magic here. I pause and wait. My only wish is to feel its warm embrace.

Meadow fairies call
from their dark caves down under
while magic roots stir
new growth surrenders
lamenting the cold spring snow

A flock of Lark Buntings takes wing filling the sky with their dark shadows. Startled, I turn and stare at the thick brown cattails as they rattle and shake from the bird’s departure in the shallow arroyo. My enchantment is complete while the sound of their avian voices echoes in my heart. Yes, the old magic is here and another season is mine to keep.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PEACE & TEAR

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

“The Celebration” – A Haibun

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of wish & magic. Remember, synonyms are encouraged.

This week, I decided to write a Haibun with a Tanka, called “The Celebration.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your prose & poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: Babble.com


Image credit: Imgflip.com

“The Celebration”

As the sun kisses my face, I reach my arms toward the brightness of the pale blue sky. The festival is nigh. Today is Earth Day, and I feel mother Gaia firm and fertile under the crusty snow beneath my feet. There is a coolness to the springtime breeze that drifts around me like a mist filled with ancient memories. The scent of marsh grasses fills my soul with a yearning that cannot be quenched. I feel the old magic here. I pause and wait. My only wish is to feel its warm embrace.

Meadow fairies call
from their dark caves down under
while magic roots stir
new growth surrenders
lamenting the cold spring snow

A flock of Lark Buntings takes wing filling the sky with their dark shadows. Startled, I turn and stare at the thick brown cattails as they rattle and shake from the bird’s departure in the shallow arroyo. My enchantment is complete while the sound of their avian voices echoes in my heart. Yes, the old magic is here and another season is mine to keep.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Thanks for stopping by.

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Wishing (a Tanka)

My birthday keeps generating the gift of poetry. Here’s a Tanka from John that has a wonderful message for all of us! ❤

Darkness of His Dreams

Wish upon a star
Blow your birthday candles out
Nothing will happen.
Act on your dreams; make them real
Like magic, your life will change.

4/18/17

This tanka is my response toColleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic(Hope you had a great birthday, Colleen!)

Poem #20 for National Poetry Writing Month (aka #<a href=”http://www.napowrimo.net/”>NaPoWriMo</a>)

View original post

Happy Birthday Colleen

I love this sweet Tanka from Marie. I am so blessed with all this poetry! ❤

The Syllabub Sea

Inspired by Colleen’s Birthday Challenge.

Bon Anniversaire

belle Colleen, may all your dreams

and wishes come true.

Magical celebration

of your life’s many blessings.

470/366

Marie

View original post

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 30 – Wish & Magic

Marje and I have never met in real life but we know each other so well! This is an excellent Tanka filled with all of my favorite things. ❤

K Y R O S M A G I C A

Colleen Chesebro’s Poetry Challenge

Colleen Chesebro and I share quite a few interests in common, as a matter of fact we do find that when we do those quizzes on Facebook we sometimes get the same results! This morning we both ended up being like the moon… with a dark and a light side!

It’s my good friend Colleen’s birthday today so what better way to celebrate than to write her a Happy Birthday Tanka.

There will be no moons, dark, or light aspects to the birthday wishes as Colleen’s prompt words: wish and magic are much more suitable for a birthday poem. Colleen is a big fan of fairies, and I’m sure she’s partial to cake, and no doubt appreciates the wonder of rainbows so I thought this might be just right.

Birthday cake rainbow,Glowing with magic wishes,Fairy guests arrive,Gliding on light-hearted wings,Linger awhile, rest and play! (1)

A very happy birthday to Colleen, and all the best for a fairy special day!

I wish I could spend…

View original post 19 more words

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic 2 Birthday

All I wanted for my birthday was poetry! Judy has written an amazing Haiku. Thank you, my dear friend. ❤

Today for Colleen’s weekly #poetry prompt she has given us wish & magic to use. I have written a #haiku this time for her birthday

Source: Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #30 Wish & Magic 2 Birthday