“Day Dreams,” #tanka

The Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge asked us to write about “dreams” this week.

I wrote a tanka poem:

Image by Michael Grey from Pixabay

Day Dreams

 blue sky, cloud watching
 under the green canopy,
 opaque day dreams build
 poetry and story plots,
 fashioning magical worlds

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The tanka is one of the most popular forms in our challenge. Let’s review a few of the characteristics of the tanka.

The 5/7/5/7/7 syllabic form is written from the perspective of the poet. Japanese poetry has stricter rules than other poetry, although the tanka is the most forgiving of these forms.

The first three lines of your tanka should convey a specific theme. The last two lines of your tanka are usually where the pivot occurs. The pivot should change the course of your writing with an implied metaphor, or some kind of comparison. You want to link the two parts of your poetry so the reader can connect to your meaning in fresh ways.

Don’t end your lines with articles and prepositions. Always use precise language: verbs, adjectives, etc. Use your five senses when writing tanka poetry.

Compose, read, and write your tanka poems to be read forward and backward. Often, the meaning changes or becomes more impactful to the reader when read backward.

Have fun writing tanka poetry!

“Still Cold (Yokan)” haiku

Frank Tassone is buried in three feet of snow! For his Haikai challenge #177, this week he asks us to write our favorite haikai poem (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) alluding to either:

  • Still Cold (yokan)/New Year (Shinnen)
  • Mardi Gras/Ash Wednesday

“Still Cold,” haiku

bright, blinding snowlight 
luminous snowflake crystals
crunching tires, still cold

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Photo by Egor Kamelev on Pexels.com

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

“At the Precipice,” #BadgerHexastich, #PhotoPrompt

This week, the Tanka Tuesday Ekphrastic poetry challenge asked us to write our poetry using the psychology of color. We can take the image at face value, or choose a specific color in the rainbow umbrella to write about, or we can write about the lack of color. However, we interpret this image is up to us… we just have to make sure to incorporate the psychology of color.

Notice the “gray” bland coloring of the waterfall in the image. Gray is an interesting neutral, stuck between black and white, neither good nor evil. This color signifies distance, remoteness, almost a cold reckoning. I used the Badger Hexastich for this image because the short syllable structure helped to convey my word choice. The first stanza accentuates the gray.

The second stanza zeroes in on the symbolism of the rainbow umbrella – diversity found in the colors of the rainbow.

This Badger Hexastich deals with opposites: alone, and with you. Check out the cheatsheet to learn more about this form. It’s updated on wordcraftpoetry. com.

At the Precipice

Alone—
cold reticence
blending in with the crowd
playing it safe, balanced
turbulently
detached

With you— 
diversity
embracing life's choices
happy together in
our unity
as one

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The first double ennead challenge is up at the Saddle Up Saloon at carrot ranch.com. Join in and learn a new form HERE.

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

“Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki)” #haiku

Frank Tassone’s Haikai challenge asks us to celebrate by writing the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to either Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki), New Year’s Eve (toshi no yo), or New Year’s Day (ganjitsu).

Frank says:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

I started with a 2/3/2 haiku, a 3/5/3 haiku, and finished with a traditional 5/7/5 haiku all dedicated to the Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki).

***

Photo by Frank Cone on Pexels.com

Cold moon
hopes and dreams
fulfilled

Long night’s moon
darkness and cold hides
spring below

December Full Moon
myths awaken under stars
the goddess slumbers

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I’ve also added this sequence for Tanka Tuesday, where I asked everyone to write about hope. This is my last post for 2020. I’ll see you all in the new year in a new home in Michigan!

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

The Tanka Tuesday weekly poetry challenge will return January 19, 2021. All poets welcome! ❤

“The New Age of Aquarius,” #haiku

Yay! Frank Tassone’s Haikai challenge is back! I found inspiration in the kigo: 170 – Winter Solstice II/Christmas.

Yuletide blessings flow
from dawn's light thorough Stonehenge
the sun god returns

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Pagans around the world celebrate the return of the light as the Wheel of the Year continues to turn. May the darkness of this plague-ridden year be behind us!

Happy Yule, Merry Christmas, & Happy New Year!

“Yuletide,” #cinquain

Merry Christmas! This week for my Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge, I asked everyone to contribute a cinquain so I could create a huge garland of cinquain to wrap around our “poet-tree.”

I wrote this cinquain for the Winter Solstice, but totally forgot to post it! Better late than never!

Yuletide—
the longest night
of celestial darkness
brings us the return of sunshine 
balanced

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

New Form: The Pareiku, from Auroras & Blossoms

The Auroras & Blossoms Poetry Journal has created a new poetry form called the pareiku.

The word “pareiku” combines two concepts:

  • ‘pareidolia’ – the tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern.
  • ‘-ku’ – a tribute to Japanese poetry forms like the haiku and tanka.

The rules to create this form are quite simple:

  1. Link together two seemingly unrelated images as one via a 19-syllable poem.
  2. The poem must have a title and follow the 7-5-7 syllable pattern. Punctuation is optional.
  3. The two images can feature the same or different types of visual art. But you must own copyrights / have permission from the artist(s) to use those images. And credits are required at the end of your piece.
  4. Pareiku are meant to be positive / inspirational and family-friendly. So no erotica and no swear words allowed.

Learn more about the form here: Pareiku


Image by bertvthul from Pixabay

The pathway through the darkness
replete with dangers—
often leads us to the light

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Image by Stefan Keller from Pixabay

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

“Change,” A Quadrille

Photo by Frank Cone on Pexels.com
The full cold moon
  abides the darkness of night
  where moonbeams light up the sky 
  with silver little-girl dreams,
  to remind us of how most things 
  never stay the same.
  Change is the catalyst. 
  Follow your intuition to find
  your correct path to joy.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

A quadrille for dVerse. Lisa is hosting and asks us to use the word, “abide.” A quadrille is a poem of 44 words (excluding the title.) You MUST use the word “abide” in your poem.

If you are new, here’s how to join in:
*Write a poem (in any form) in response to the challenge.
*Enter a link directly to your poem and your name by clicking Mr Linky below and remember to check the little box to accept the use/privacy policy.
*You will find links to other poets and more will join, so check back later to read their poems.
*Read and comment on other poets’ work–we all come here to have our poems read.
*Please link back to dVerse from your site/blog.

LOOK for the full cold moon in the morning sky.

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

“Melancholy Autumn,” #Haiku

This week’s theme for our poetry challenge is a haiku written by Sue Vincent:

clouds cover the moon, 
beyond dawn's pale horizon 
sun rises unseen  

©2020 Sue Vincent

The idea is to use Sue’s haiku as inspiration for your own syllabic poetry. Remember, in this challenge we can use any of the following poetry forms:

Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Renga, Solo-Renga, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma

Image by imagii from Pixabay

silver mist conceals
shadows of past and present
cleansed by icy rain

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Let’s Talk About Haiku

HAIKU IN ENGLISH: Traditional Haiku in English is written in three lines with five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the last line: 5/7/5, for a total of seventeen syllables written in the present tense.

Haiku do not rhyme, nor do they contain metaphors and similes. The use of an implied metaphor is acceptable.

The current standards for creating Haiku in English suggest a form with three lines and syllables of 3/5/3 (11 syllables). Even the more abbreviated haiku version with three lines and syllables of 2/3/2 (7 syllables) is now thought of more favorably than the traditional 5/7/5 format. Hybrid haiku are written with seventeen-syllables in one or more lines.

Most haiku are written about nature, the seasons, a beautiful moment in nature, an emotional experience while in nature, or change. A haiku should share a special moment of awareness with the reader.

There is often a seasonal word used to explain the time of year, called a kigo, which is a seasonal description, such as: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, and New Year’s. There should only be one kigo per haiku. It’s up to the poet to decide if they want to include a kigo in their poem.

Most haiku do not contain titles.

The use of punctuation is optional in the creation of the haiku.

Three or more haiku written together are considered a series or sequence.

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

“The Rebirth,” #Tanka

The Tanka Tuesday #PhotoPrompt challenge for this week explores Ekphrastic writing inspired by visual art (photographs). Diana Peach from last month’s challenge has provided the photo for this month’s challenge, seen above.

“The Rebirth,” #Tanka

the forest's womb holds
my reflection in limbo—
grief cleanses my soul
saying goodbye, my tears fall
another rebirth awaits

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Life is often a series of starts and stops, followed by many new beginnings. I’ve embraced the change. ❤