“Break of Day,” Oracle Poetry

I had a lovely visit with the poetry Oracle today. I’m always grateful for her poetic inspiration. She’s been encouraging me to explore free-verse or prose poetry. I still prefer my syllabic verse but it is fun to create from her inspiration in a pure sense of just letting the words flow. Happy Saturday!

#Michigan Woods, #Tanka

soft winds rustle leaves
below the green canopy
blue jay's whisper song
recalls wild fairy dances,
lush mushrooms—and dreams of sky

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

This is your friendly reminder that the Word Weaving Poetry Journal is accepting submissions until July 15, 2021.

We publish haiku, senryu, haiga, gogyohka, tanka, tanka prose, haibun, cinquain poetry including any cinquain variations, Etheree, nonet, shadorma, Badger hexastich, Abhanga, and Diatelle syllabic poetry forms. We would love to see your work. If accepted, we will strive to present your work in such a way as to make you proud.

We share a broad view of what makes up haiku and senryu. We are not hostile to 5-7-5 but expect to publish more poems with fewer syllables. We are open to 1, 2, & 3 lines and other configurations.

We accept submissions from May 15 through July 15 for our first October issue. There is no submission fee.

Read more HERE.

Send us your magical poetry!

#solo-renga, #haiku, #tanka

For Frank Tassone’s challenge, I used the kigo “midsummer rain” for challenge #195 to write a solo renga:

midsummer rain flows
rivulets run down the street
rainbow slicks glisten

the heady scent of wet earth
moisture adds a second skin

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

For challenge #196, “summer moon (natsu no tsuki) / Strawberry Supermoon, I wrote a (5-7-5) haiku:

summer moon glitter
long light snakes across the lake
twilight shadows swell

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

For challenge #197 smoldering hot (moyuru) I wrote a tanka:

smoldering hot day
brilliant sun scintillations
a twinkling mirage
blurring the straight pathway home
stay on the straight and narrow

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

#Fairy #Tarot Friday—Ten of Autumn, #chōka

Welcome to Fairy Tarot Friday. Each Friday I’ll share a card from the Fairy Tarot deck by Doreen Virtue & Radleigh Valentine, featuring an uplifting message from the fey. I’ll also include a bit of syllabic poetry inspired by the card reading.

The Major Arcana contains 22 cards that describe major events and turning points in our lives (marriage, pregnancy, relationship and career changes, and overcoming personal challenges). The Major Arcana cards also represent the different phases from childhood to old age.

Doreen Virtue numbered the Minor Arcana cards to comprise four suits representing different aspects of human life. They number the Minor Arcana cards 1 (Ace) through 10, plus the four court cards (Princess, Prince, Queen, and King). The Minor Arcana reflects the day-to-day aspects of our lives and the people in them. Court cards represent either a situation or a person during a reading.

The Minor Arcana comprises four suits. In traditional Tarot they are; wands, cups, swords, and coins. In Fairy Tarot, the four suits reflect the seasons: Spring for wands, Summer for cups, Winter for swords, and Autumn for coins. In Angel Tarot, the seasons represent the four elements: fire = spring, water = summer, air = winter, and earth = autumn. Consider these elements in relation to the Fairy Tarot, as well.

The divinatory meanings are given for upright cards only—this tarot is not intended for reversed readings.

Once you get to know the fairies, you’ll see they are strong-willed environmentalists. They get perturbed at people who mistrust animals or the earth. Never lie to a fairy. Instead, help them take care of the planet and other living beings. Do your part. Your actions will richly reward you, and the fairies will encourage you in amazing ways.

Today’s Card

Our theme for this week’s Tanka Tuesday challenge was to write on the theme of discovery. The first thing that came to mind was the purity of thought involving self-discovery. My fairy tarot card for the day was the Ten of Autumn (Pentacles or Coins in other tarot decks), which inspired this chōka:

“A Discovery of Success”

cycle completed,
like ships passing in the night
alone, you arrive—
wealthy, but what have you lost?
searching for success
reality settles in,
new assets acquired
you've made it to the top
family matters the most!

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Happy Friday!

“Only the Now Remains,” #chōka, #dverse poets

Lisa is hosting at dVerse, and she asked us to write a poem inspired by an Ernest Hemingway quote from the list on the challenge post HERE. My selected quote follows along with my chōka:

There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now, and if now is only two days, then two days is your life and everything in it will be in proportion.

–For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940)

“Only the Now Remains”

everyone leaves us
by chance, change, desertion, death
all alone we drift 
like fallen leaves aimlessly 
rudderless on the 
waterway of time until
the river parts us 
all in the end...treasure the
moments that go with the flow

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

This quote from Hemingway puts the current world into perspective. Live in the moment, as our tomorrows can certainly be limited. Be glad you’re alive. ❤

“Midsummer’s Eve Magic,” Chōka-like

Artwork credit: Kerfe Roig

Kerfe shared a breathtaking piece of art she created for our Tanka Tuesday challenge this week. I saw so much magic in this piece. The Summer Solstice is right around the corner! Can you feel it?

A note about the chōka form. The nine-line chōka (5-7-5-7-5-7-5-7-7) should be unrhymed… but for whatever reason, the muse demanded words that rhyme. I suspect faery intervention as the good neighbors love to rhyme. That’s why I called it “chōka-like,” or inspired by the chōka syllabic form.

Midsummer’s Eve Magic

on midsummer's eve,
below June's moon glowing bright
gather up fern seeds 
for special sight—this magic 
summons all creatures 
don the cloak of unseen light
hunt buried treasure 
beware of faery spite
run when magic birds take flight

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Celebrate the Summer Solstice with Fairies, Myths, & Magic: A Summer Celebration

Step into a world where fairies, dragons, and other magical beings converge in a collection of poetry and short stories inspired by the celebration of Litha, the Summer Solstice. Meet Drac, a dragon cursed by his own poisonous deeds, and two pixies who help an old man remember a lost love. You’ll meet a pair of fairies with a sense of humor, and a young girl who fulfills her destiny after being struck by lightning. Learn what happens when a modern witch’s spell goes terribly wrong. Meet the Sisters of the Fey, a group of Slavic Witches who sign a pact with the Rusalki Fey to preserve their magic for the good of all. Atmospheric and haunting, the prose and poetry, will rewrite the mythologies of the past bringing them into the future.

“#Michigan #Gardening,” #haibun

I feel great satisfaction in the planting and growing of perennials. They become my offspring, a by-product of the energy I infuse into the plants to grow and become strong. Each season, I fuss over the fresh growth, thrilled that my plant babies survived another year.

day’s first blush
halcyon weather
eventide storms

Today, the humidity wrapped vaporous tendrils of fog around the trees in my neighborhood. As I labored in the garden digging holes, my sweat dripped into the soil.

dark clouds birth
crepuscular light
draws rainfall

By the time the rains came, my plants were tucked into the soil and my balance with nature was again restored.

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro


This haibun is an example of a prose envelope haibun (prose, haiku, prose). An explantation of the form is found on page 84-89 in the print book of Word Craft: Prose & Poetry.

This week’s Tanka Tuesday challenge was to pick synonyms for the words dawn and twilight selected by Gwen Plano. I used “first blush” for dawn and “eventide” for twilight. In the second haiku, I used “birth” for dawn, and “crepuscular light” for twilight.

Summer Love, #shadorma

Merril D. Smith writes an “Oracle” inspired poem every Saturday. This week, I thought I would jump into some magnetic poetry to see what I could come up with. Susan Joy Clark also joined in.

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

You can find the Magnetic Poetry Oracle HERE. You receive a random set of words used to construct your poem. This shadorma came together quickly. Syllabic poetry is all about the brevity of words. This is one way to experiment.

Have fun and write some Oracle inspired poetry!