“Swift Passage”

The Carrot Ranch April 1, 2021, flash fiction prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less), write a story about a swift passage. You can take inspiration from any source. Who is going where and why? What makes it swift? Go where the prompt leads!

Respond by April 6, 2021.

This is my poetic, 99-word contribution for this week written as a tribute to Sue Vincent. ❤

“Swift Passage”

Sunlight, a pink aurora in the shining sky
from the brushwood, the crows take wing
shadows dance and small birds sing
swift passage comes for ancestral souls on high.

Faery queens gather to welcome their otherworldly kin
she who walked among those bound to the earth
now takes passage within the Bardo of her rebirth,
spring rain washes away the pain of our loss and chagrin.

Raise your arms to the circle of the sun
close your eyes and breathe, inhale the celestial breath
thank you for the golden words of wisdom you've spun
your earthly quest is won.

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

#Senryu

This week for Tanka Tuesday, we’re working on crafting meaningful haiku and senryu. Senryu in English focus on the awkward moments in life making the human, not the world around them, the subject.

First in 5-7-5:

Parkinson's disease—
the shaky termination
of old memories

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Next in 3-5-3:

Parkinsons disease—
the shaky endings
of memory

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

This is a difficult subject to write about but one that deserves attention. My brother-in-law suffers from this debilitating disease.

Parkinson’s Disease Statistics:

  • Nearly one million will be living with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in the U.S. by 2020, which is more than the combined number of people diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, and Lou Gehrig’s disease (or Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis)
  • Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with PD each year.
  • More than 10 million people worldwide are living with PD.
  • Incidence of Parkinson’s disease increases with age, but an estimated four percent of people with PD are diagnosed before age 50.
  • Men are 1.5 times more likely to have Parkinson’s disease than women.

Learn more at Parkinson.org

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“The Dryad,” #haiku

D. L. (Denise) Finn shared the image for this week’s poetry challenge:

Image credit: D. L. Finn

I wrote a few haiku (not really a series) staying true to the rules of including a kigo (season word) and the pivot.

I love the ethereal quality to this photo. There is plenty of magic to inspire any poet!

The Dryad

From the mighty oak—
winter dryad spirits rise
Artemis rouses

***

nymphs tied to tree homes
souls married, inter-wreathed as one
love blossoms in spring

***

hamadryad fae—
bonded hardwood spirits dwell
heavy snow brings death

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The mythology of the dryad is one of my favorite subjects. Not only are the two entities bound in life, they perish together if the tree dies. Their existence is an interdependent relationship.

“Artemis is the Greek goddess of the hunt, the wilderness, wild animals, the Moon, and chastity. She also was the protector and friend to all dryad beings. For these reasons, dryads and the Greek gods punished any mortals who harmed trees without first propitiating the tree-nymphs.” (Wikipedia.com)

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“Nectar of the Devas,” #BadgerHexastich

This week for the Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge we skipped a week… Yup, it was totally my fault. This week should have been a photo prompt. No worries, we’ll do the photo prompt on March 23rd.

In the meantime, our theme prompt came from Merril D. Smith, who suggested we write about immortality.

What is immortality? A state of deathlessness— a dimension of the mind where the soul dwells after reaching Nirvana? “Immortality is mindfulness occupied with the body.” (psy-minds.com/amrita)

Immortality—Life, death, rebirth, and the circle continues until Nirvana is attained.

"Nectar of the Devas"

soma—
sweet ambrosia
the drink of the devas
immortality gained
with a mere sip...
heaven

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The idea of immortality is ancient and goes far back into antiquity. Almost all religions have some concept of immortality, as well. There is much speculation about what this nectar of the devas (soma) really was. Could it have been fly-agaric? Or was it Cannabis?

How does a Pagan Buddhist view immortality? It’s a gift from the gods…

How to be immortal in real life

Haiku & Senryu

Many thanks to Frank for hosting this challenge. This week, Frank J. Tassone’s Haikai Challenge is a Spring Trinity Challenge:

DateKigo
2/20remaining snow (zansetsu)
2/27Snow moon (Yuki no tsuki)
3/6waters warming (mizu nurumu)

Write the haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to any of these kigo .

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by jplenio from Pixabay

Remaining Snow (zansetsu) – haiku

From remaining snow—
purple crocus burgeoning
nature awakens

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Image by Pezibear from Pixabay

Snow Moon (Yuki no tuski) haiku

The snow moon glistens
betwixt endless tree shadows
wolf stalks his dinner

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Image by Peter Selbach from Pixabay

waters warming (mizu nurumu) senryu

still waters warming— 
I turn, craving your caress
your snores wake the dead

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“Spring,” A Diatelle

For Tanka Tuesday – I tried the Diatelle… finally! End rhymes have never been my favorite. I prefer the subtleness of haiku or tanka with the revelation that grabs you! Truthfully, I found it difficult to find the right word, as the rhyme dictated my choices. However, I enjoyed the form and will work with it further.

The Diatelle is a fun, syllable counting form like the etheree with a twist. The syllable structure of the diatelle is as follows: 1/2/3/4/6/8/10/12/10/8/6/4/3/2/1, but unlike an etheree, has a set rhyme pattern of abbcbccaccbcbba. This poetry form may be written on any subject matter and looks best center aligned in a diamond shape.

Image by InspiredImages from Pixabay

“Spring”

spring
sunlight
grows in might
darkness recedes
old winter wind’s harsh bite
melts the last snow airing new weeds
yellow heads releasing their fluffy seeds
who like the scarlet cardinal have taken wing
saffron forsythia blossoms now freed
tumble gently like star shine beads
new life, a welcome sight
as marsh hares breed
plants take heed
life’s creed—
spring

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“Day Dreams,” #tanka

The Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge asked us to write about “dreams” this week.

I wrote a tanka poem:

Image by Michael Grey from Pixabay

Day Dreams

 blue sky, cloud watching
 under the green canopy,
 opaque day dreams build
 poetry and story plots,
 fashioning magical worlds

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The tanka is one of the most popular forms in our challenge. Let’s review a few of the characteristics of the tanka.

The 5/7/5/7/7 syllabic form is written from the perspective of the poet. Japanese poetry has stricter rules than other poetry, although the tanka is the most forgiving of these forms.

The first three lines of your tanka should convey a specific theme. The last two lines of your tanka are usually where the pivot occurs. The pivot should change the course of your writing with an implied metaphor, or some kind of comparison. You want to link the two parts of your poetry so the reader can connect to your meaning in fresh ways.

Don’t end your lines with articles and prepositions. Always use precise language: verbs, adjectives, etc. Use your five senses when writing tanka poetry.

Compose, read, and write your tanka poems to be read forward and backward. Often, the meaning changes or becomes more impactful to the reader when read backward.

Have fun writing tanka poetry!

“Still Cold (Yokan)” haiku

Frank Tassone is buried in three feet of snow! For his Haikai challenge #177, this week he asks us to write our favorite haikai poem (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) alluding to either:

  • Still Cold (yokan)/New Year (Shinnen)
  • Mardi Gras/Ash Wednesday

“Still Cold,” haiku

bright, blinding snowlight 
luminous snowflake crystals
crunching tires, still cold

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Photo by Egor Kamelev on Pexels.com

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“At the Precipice,” #BadgerHexastich, #PhotoPrompt

This week, the Tanka Tuesday Ekphrastic poetry challenge asked us to write our poetry using the psychology of color. We can take the image at face value, or choose a specific color in the rainbow umbrella to write about, or we can write about the lack of color. However, we interpret this image is up to us… we just have to make sure to incorporate the psychology of color.

Notice the “gray” bland coloring of the waterfall in the image. Gray is an interesting neutral, stuck between black and white, neither good nor evil. This color signifies distance, remoteness, almost a cold reckoning. I used the Badger Hexastich for this image because the short syllable structure helped to convey my word choice. The first stanza accentuates the gray.

The second stanza zeroes in on the symbolism of the rainbow umbrella – diversity found in the colors of the rainbow.

This Badger Hexastich deals with opposites: alone, and with you. Check out the cheatsheet to learn more about this form. It’s updated on wordcraftpoetry. com.

At the Precipice

Alone—
cold reticence
blending in with the crowd
playing it safe, balanced
turbulently
detached

With you— 
diversity
embracing life's choices
happy together in
our unity
as one

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The first double ennead challenge is up at the Saddle Up Saloon at carrot ranch.com. Join in and learn a new form HERE.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki)” #haiku

Frank Tassone’s Haikai challenge asks us to celebrate by writing the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to either Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki), New Year’s Eve (toshi no yo), or New Year’s Day (ganjitsu).

Frank says:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

I started with a 2/3/2 haiku, a 3/5/3 haiku, and finished with a traditional 5/7/5 haiku all dedicated to the Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki).

***

Photo by Frank Cone on Pexels.com

Cold moon
hopes and dreams
fulfilled

Long night’s moon
darkness and cold hides
spring below

December Full Moon
myths awaken under stars
the goddess slumbers

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I’ve also added this sequence for Tanka Tuesday, where I asked everyone to write about hope. This is my last post for 2020. I’ll see you all in the new year in a new home in Michigan!

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

The Tanka Tuesday weekly poetry challenge will return January 19, 2021. All poets welcome! ❤