Waiting for Spring – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “clouds” to “shroud,” and I left the word “spring.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image Credit: BrainyQuote.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Waiting for Spring

Winter winds beckon –
as gray mists shroud the mountain,
nature springs anew.
Just when I think it’s over
Mother Nature throws a blow.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: CLOUDS & SPRING, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo above.

STAY TUNED FOR NEXT TUESDAY’S POETRY CHALLENGE.
MY POETS HAVE GRADUATED, AND WE WILL BE STARTING SOMETHING NEW…

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps, you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017. 

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

 Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 24th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – FIRE & RAIN: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 24 – FIRE & RAIN/Two on a Rant

Fire & Rain – Playing with words

Tanka: Fire & Rain – Jane Dougherty Writes

Soul on Fire – Reena Saxena

When Nature Muse (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

“FIRE & RAIN” – Mick E Talbot Poems

Promise | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #24 Fire and Rain | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 24 – “FIRE & RAIN” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Untouched by the Rain (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Fire & Rain | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka //Poetry Challenge// Rain & Fire – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Fireflies | The Syllabub Sea

Coming of Spring: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

When the Cold Wind Blows | method two madness

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #24 Fire & Rain/Deepikas Ramblings

A #Colorado Spring – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is Method Two Madness (Kerfe & Nina). Excellent imagery in her words and make sure and play the song while you are reading her Tanka.

Read the fourth line! The description is excellent.

If you see fire, if
fire is spilled, smothered by rain,
stolen from the sun–

are bridges burned, rivers run
dry?  A cold flaming.  Unquenched.

©2017 Method Two Madness

James Taylor released his album “Sweet Baby James” in 1970, the year I graduated from high school.  It was a constant in my life for the next few years and remains a touchstone for remembering that time.


When Colleen titled her tanka challenge this week “Fire and Rain,” James Taylor’s song immediately began to play in my head.  Almost all the songs on “Sweet Baby James” talk about the sun, yet there’s a touch of melancholy in every word.  Colleen’s prompt photo, too, seems to reflect these contradictory feelings.  Endings, beginnings:  fire and rain.  My tanka is an imagined conversation with the album and the song.

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CLOUDS & SPRING

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps, you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017. 

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

 Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

A #Colorado Spring – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “fire” to “fiery,” and I left the word “rain.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: NotableQuotes.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Blown by winter gales –
field grasses dry and fallow,
fiery flames devour.
The meadow choked with dark smoke
mourns the delay of spring rains.

©2017 Colleen Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: FIRE & RAIN, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo below:

SPREAD THAT LOVE AND JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 24 – “FIRE & RAIN”

welcome-to-the-tanka-cafe-on-st

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 23rd CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – HELP & SMILE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Two on a Rant/Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge #23 Help & Smile

Rena Saxena/The Last Smile

Tanka: Stirrings – Jane Dougherty Writes

Naa Prapancham, My World/Spring Smiles

The Melting Snow: Smile of the Cabin Owner (Traveler’s Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

tanka “HELP & Smile” – Mick E Talbot Poems EDIT

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #23 Help & Smile | Annette Rochelle Aben

Helpful Smile | The Syllabub Sea

Help & Smile | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka – Help & Smile | radhikasreflection

Tanka Tuesday//Colleen’s weekly//poetry challenge  23 Help & Smile. – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Joy | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Cookie Crumb Lips – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge: Help and Smile | The Dragon’s Lair

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 23 – HELP & SMILE | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Deepikas Ramblings/Tanka – Help & Smile

Loki (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams EDIT

Tanka – Help/Smile | Willow Poetry EDIT

Smile | method two madness

Crone Chronicler/Tanka Challenge #23 – Help and Smile: Belle Vs. Rehab

This week’s Poet of the Week is Marie, from her blog, The Syllabub Sea. Her Tanka poem was inspired by Lewis Carroll and captures the Cheshire Cat in all his glory.

Notice how the first three lines form a picture in your mind. Marie’s last two lines are her observations. Perfect!

Helpful Cheshire cat

Guides lost travellers with an

Inscrutable grin.

But when Wonderland dissolves

The elusive cat retires.

© 2017 The Syllabub Sea

~**~

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: FIRE & RAIN

(Remember you can use any forms of the words, AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Cookie Crumb Lips – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “help” to “balm,” and I changed “smile” to “smirk.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: BrainyQuote.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Seeking redemption –
his smirk encircles my heart,
with cookie crumb lips.
My Grandchildren are a balm
which appease my failing heart.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

A photo of my grandson when he was a wee boy. Today he plays football in junior high school. Where does the time go?

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: SMILE & CHANGE, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo below:


SPREAD THAT LOVE & JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 23 – HELP & SMILE

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

tea-991046_1280

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 22nd CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – DOOR & FRIEND: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3) YES… I did not participate in my own challenge this week. I was just too busy. 😀

Tanka: Door & Friend – Jane Dougherty Writes

Welcome | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge – Door & Friend/Two on a Rant

Tanka – Door and Friend | radhikasreflection

The End of an Era – Reena Saxena

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #22 Door & Friend | Annette Rochelle Aben

Ivan Ivanovich (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 22 – “Door & Friend” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Tanka – Door & Friend – DeepikasRamblings

Tanka// friend &door// poetry challenge – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Tanka – Door & Friends: Uneasy Comfort/Crone Chronicler

The Journey: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Door & Friend | thoughts and entanglements

Doors (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Waiting for old friends. | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka-Door & Friend – All About Writing and more

What Was Lost – Tanka Poem – The Rolling Hills

Moon of Wandering | method two madness

This week’s Poet of the Week is Ina (VivaChange) from her blog, Crone Chronicler. Her Tanka poem called “Uneasy Comfort ” conveyed some uncomfortable truths we all face as we get older. I liked how she got feelings across to us with her choice of words.

Read the third and fourth lines. The emotion is there, and it is powerful.


Friend left ICU
We arrived to play word games
Hospital or no.
Underneath unspoken words
When will I go through this door?

©2017 Ina Hamilton Hart


Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: HELP & SMILE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 22 – “Door & Friend”

020617_2039_ColleensWee1.jpg

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 21st CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – FOG & RISE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” – All About Writing and more

Depth | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Tanka: Fog & change – Jane Dougherty Writes

A Riddle of Change/Two on a Rant

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #21 Fog & Change | Annette Rochelle Aben

The Fog is So Thick (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” | Ladyleemanila

Fog & Change Tanka/suzhalgal

Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday: Prompt words – Fog and Change | The Dragon’s Lair

The Wrecker’s Player/Writing, Events, Competitions & Personal Musings

“The Lark Bunting” – A #Tanka #Poem – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge-Fog & Change – All About Writing and more

Tanka Challenge-21 – The Bag Lady

The Fog – Reena Saxena

Tanka Poem – Transformative Renewal – The Rolling Hills

Tanka – Fog & Change | radhikasreflection

Tanka – Fog and Change – DeepikasRamblings

Before The First Step – Thoughts of Words

Fog Recedes: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Alchemy | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Winter’s Freezing Fog | The Syllabub Sea

Before the First Step/Thoughts of Words Blog

Fog & Change/Thoughts & Entanglements

wavering | method two madness

No Time for Fun – Life at 17

This week’s Poet of the Week is Kerfe and Nina from their blog, Method Two Madness. I don’t know which one wrote the Tanka poem called “Wavering,” but I was literally blown away by the creativity.

The last two lines sum up the author’s feelings exactly! You know what else I loved? No punctuation. The lack of it conveys her message of disarray or confusion.

PLUS… The author did a painting! (I have space in my creative room for that beauty)! ❤

dislocated map
the trees have changed positions
air and light play tricks

hiding in the miasma
the zone between yes and no

©2017 Method Two Madness

~*~

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: DOOR & FRIEND

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

022017_1832_ColleensWee10.pngTANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find new reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

“The Lark Bunting” – A #Tanka #Poem

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I kept the prompt words of “Fog” and “Change.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

REMEMBER: The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image Credit: Quotesgram.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

A meadow nymph –
fragile and lissome of wing,
the lark bunting flies.
Change is coming to the fields
after the mountain fogs clear.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

A sneak peek at some of the poetry found in The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Meadow Fairy, the second book in the series… still in its infancy. ❤

The Lark Bunting is the Colorado State bird. Learn more about this amazing creature here.

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: FOG & CHANGE, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo below:

Image Credit: Pixabay.com


SPREAD THAT LOVE & JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change”

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 19th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CRAFT & RISE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

 Tanka: Angel & Devil – Jane Dougherty Writes

 Tanka Tuesday: Angel &Devil – Image & Word

Communication – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #20 – Angel & Devil/Two on a Rant

Angel by Devil’s Act/Naa Prapancham, My World

 Angel & Devil | thoughts and entanglements

 Tanka Tuesday: Angel and Devil | K Y R O S M A G I C A

 Colleen’s Weekly Tanka-Angel&Devil – All About Writing and more

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #20 Angel & Devil | Annette Rochelle Aben

Angelic (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Point of view | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

A Lost Poem on the Bookmark – Thoughts of Words

Tanka -Discord | Mother Willow

 Aurora Laughs: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Angel & Devil Tanka/Suzhalgal

Follow the Drinking Gourd | method two madness

Memories/Life at 17

Angel Frost – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is Merrill. Her Tanka poem called “Aurora Laughs,” really spoke to me this week.

Read the fourth line! The description is excellent.

Aurora laughs, flies,

paints the sky with angel wings,

through cracks, light streams in

devil-dark of winter lifts

hope and beauty still exist

©2017 Merril D. Smith

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: FOG & CHANGE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


Angel Frost – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I kept the prompt word “Angel” and changed “devil” to “Lucifer.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can modify the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

REMEMBER: The best poetry has layers of meaning.

“A poet is a nightingale, who sits in darkness and sings to cheer its own solitude with sweet sounds.”

~ Percy Bysshe Shelley
Brainyquote.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Angel Frost

Lucifer’s artwork –
lacy fingered angel frost,
sketched by stinging winds.
Winter’s artistic palate
hiding spring beneath the snow.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

~*~

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: ANGEL & DEVIL, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo above.


SPREAD THAT LOVE & JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram



Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #20 – “Angel & Devil”

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 19th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CRAFT & RISE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Sunrise on the Sea/Jane Dougherty Writes

Frozen Chosen | The Poetry Channel

Behind Your Success – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

Magic – Tanka Poem – The Rolling Hills

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #19 – “Craft & Rise” – All About Writing and more

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #19/Two on a Rant

the craft rise and fall | rivrvlogr

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #19 – “Craft & Rise” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #19 Craft & Rise | Annette Rochelle Aben

Riddles | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo EDIT

The Artist (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Craft & Rise | thoughts and entanglements

The Dragon Healer – A “Tanka” – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer EDIT

Ark | method two madness

Icarus: A Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Creator’s Craft/Naa Prapancham, My World…

A pink paper bird – Life at 17

Tanka | Craft & Rise – Mick E Talbot Poems

 * A Haibun Reply/Mick E Talbot Poems *

* What is a Haibun? Poets.org says:

“Haibun is a poetic form that allows one to answer some of these questions while providing a fresh perspective through a lens that focuses on nature and landscape. Haibun combines a prose poem with a haiku. The haiku usually ends the poem as a sort of whispery and insightful postscript to the prose of the beginning of the poem. Another way of looking at the form is thinking of haibun as highly focused testimony or recollection of a journey composed of a prose poem and ending with a meaningful murmur of sorts: a haiku. The result is a very elegant block of text with the haiku serving as a tiny bowl or stand for the prose poem. A whole series of them in a manuscript look like neat little signs or flags—a visual delight.”

This week’s Poet of the Week is Sue Vincent. Her Tanka poem called “Riddles,” really spoke to me this week. Sue always tells me that her poetry is layered with meaning. You will think so too, once you’ve read her excellent creation. ❤

©2017 Sue Vincent

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: ANGEL & DEVIL

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


The Dragon Healer – A “Tanka”

013017_1819_ColleensWee7.jpg

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “craft” to “approach,” and I changed “rise” to “rises.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can modify the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

The Dragon Healer

Awaiting her fate –
the girl perfects her approach
with a healing touch.
The dragon rises and sighs
a mellowed-out breath of thanks.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: CRAFT & RISE, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions this photo invokes:

013017_1819_ColleensWee10.jpg

SPREAD THAT LOVE & JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #19 – “Craft & Rise”

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 18th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CHARM & TOUCH: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #18 – “Charm & Touch” – All About Writing and more

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #18 – “Charm & Touch” – Ladyleemanila

Whispered Incantation | The Poetry Channel

Tanka: Spring stirring – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #18 Charm & Touch | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #18 Charm & Touch/Two on a Rant

Charisma – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

The Charmed Heart | The Poetry Channel

Snowflakes | thoughts and entanglements

Beauty that Rules My Heart/Naa Prapancham, My World…

A Gift, But Not My Own – Tanka Poem – The Rolling Hills

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #18 – “Charm & Touch” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Tracings | method two madness

Charm | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Tanka Challenge # 18- Touch & Charm/radhikas reflection

A Little is Enough (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

My Daughter My Angel/Naa Prapancham, My World…

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #18 -Charm & Touch/Girls Like Me

Devil at Work/Rules 640

Flurries | Lemon Shark Reef

The Golden Star Child – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s poet of the week is Sri Sudha K, from her blog, Naa Prapancham, My World… I loved how she got into the image and let the words flow about her own daughter.

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CRAFT & RISE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

TANKA TUESDAY!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

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The Golden Star Child – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “charm” to “allure,” and I changed “touch” to “touches.” Both words have many connotations and can modify the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. I also used the photo as my inspiration. ❤

Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions. The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Use these hashtags to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: CHARM & TOUCH, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions this photo invokes:

The golden star child –
spreading her hidden allure,
she breathes compassion.
Her healing gift touches me,
surrounding me with her love.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

SPREAD THAT LOVE & JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #18 – “Charm & Touch”

011617_1801_ColleensWee1.jpg

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

** IF YOU CAN’T FIND INSPIRATION FROM THE PROMPT WORDS-WRITE YOUR TANKA BASED OFF THE FEELINGS YOU GET WHEN YOU LOOK AT THIS PHOTO BELOW **

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 17th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – STORM & COLOR: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Stormy depth – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

Tanka sequence: Storm & Colour – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #17 ‘storm & color’ – Micks Blog

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #17 – “Storm & Color” – All About Writing and more

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge #17 Storm & Color | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #17 – “Storm & Colour” – Ladyleemanila

Tanka – Storm/Color | Mother Willow

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #17 – “Storm & Color” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Look | thoughts and entanglements

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY CHALLENGE #17 – “STORM & COLOR”/Two on a Rant

Naturally Artistic | The Poetry Channel

Storm | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

A Kiss In The Rain – Doodles and Scribbles

we are the mirrors | method two madness

Winter Storms (tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

But which is more dark? – Life at 17

The Winds of Change – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is Mick Talbot, from Mick’s blog. Click on the links and stop by his blog and say hello. He wrote the following Tanka’s based on the prompt words. I loved his contributions, but the third one really inspired me.

Storm & Color

………………….
the raging oceans
dolphins surfing white horses
mermaids inviting
dawns red coloured clouds warnings
ignore the siren singing

autumnal storms blow
leaves yellow orange red bronze
natures confetti
woodland colour revealing
jostling rustling dancing leaves

storm weather brainstorm
multi colour black or white
cleared the air think-tanked
both holding the future plans
man invents nature creates

love torn storm breaks hearts
a tiff a spat kiss make up
loves cruel hurt games
compromise trust each other
46 years heartfelt advice to all

we’ve a storm to brave
the futures causing worry
feared color blood red
imagination strife rife
alarm rings nightmares again
………………..
© Mick Talbot 2017

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CHARM & TOUCH

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t

Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo above.

TANKA TUESDAY!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


The Winds of Change – A #Tanka

Hello! I’m late, I’m late… The arrival of Monday has got the better of me!

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “storm” to “rage and/or bluster,” and I changed “color” to “tints.” Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways.

Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions. The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

“Use these hashtags to Tweet each other’s poems: #Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: Storm & Color, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions this photo invokes:

Clouds swirl with rage –
as the winds of change bluster,
voices speak in tongues.
Noise tints the waiting silence.
The calm before the dark storm.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Hugs everyone!

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #17 – “Storm & Color”

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

** IF YOU CAN’T FIND INSPIRATION FROM THE PROMPT WORDS… WRITE YOUR TANKA BASED OFF THE FEELINGS YOU GET WHEN YOU LOOK AT THIS PHOTO **

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address from silverthreading.com to colleenchesebro.com).

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hastags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 15th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – BLOOM & LATE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Winter roses – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #16 – BLOOM & LATE – Ladyleemanila

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #16 Bloom & Late | Annette Rochelle Aben

On time | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Challenge | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Bloom & Late | thoughts and entanglements

Snowflake | method two madness

When the Time is Right (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Colleens Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #16 | bloom – late – Micks Blog

 Winter – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #16 – Bloom & Late/Two on a Rant

“Purple Genesis” & “Studious Young Girls” – TWO #Tankas – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is Marjorie Mallon of Kyrosmagica. Marje said this is her “first” Tanka. I loved her positive message, and hope you will too. The last line really spoke volumes to me! ❤

© 2017 Marjorie Mallon – Kyrosmagica Blog

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: STORM & COLOR

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the words don’t inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo above. 

TANKA TUESDAY!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find new reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

colleenchesebro.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram