Colleen’s 2019 #Book #Reviews – “Mahoney,” by Author, Andrew Joyce, @HuckFinn76

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Title: Mahoney

Amazon Author Page: Andrew Joyce

Genres: Historical Biographical Fiction, U.S. Historical Fiction, Historical Irish Fiction

Goodreads

In the Author’s Words ~

In this compelling, richly researched novel, author Andrew Joyce tells a story of determination and grit as the Mahoney clan fights to gain a foothold in America. From the first page to the last, fans of Edward Rutherfurd and W. Michael Gear will enjoy this riveting, historically accurate tale of adventure, endurance, and hope.

In the second year of an Gorta Mhór—the Great Famine—nineteen-year-old Devin Mahoney lies on the dirt floor of his small, dark cabin. He has not eaten in five days. His only hope of survival is to get to America, the land of milk and honey. After surviving disease and storms at sea that decimate crew and passengers alike, Devin’s ship limps into New York Harbor three days before Christmas, 1849. Thus starts an epic journey that will take him and his descendants through one hundred and fourteen years of American history, including the Civil War, the Wild West, and the Great Depression.

Amazon.com

My Recommendation ~

As of fan of Joyce’s western themed novels, I couldn’t wait to read this book! “Mahoney,” chronicles the lives of three generations of men detailing the trials and tribulations of their father-son relationships bound together by a proud Irish heritage.

Part one delves into Devin Mahoney’s story. The reader learns how he immigrated from Ireland to the United States to escape the potato famine. From the perils of the ship crossing to his escape off the death ship, Devin finds America full of discrimination against his Irish heritage. Times are tough, but Devin has the drive of ten men. He vows to become a success in this new land.

Andrew Joyce depicts the details of Devin’s journey with precision and skill, leaving nothing to the imagination. Be prepared for your senses to explode from the detailed descriptions. I found many of these chapters emotionally charged and filled with some of Joyce’s best writing to date.

I must add that the use of Epistolary communication in this section is one of my favorite literary forms. Joyce spares no emotions in his raw depictions of the Civil War.

Part two shares the life of Dillon, Devon’s son who sets out on a journey to the American West. What he finds is every young man’s dream. He joins a cattle drive as a cook and learns how to become a cowboy. Eventually, he takes on the title of U.S. Marshall – even hunting down a few criminals. In California, Dillon strikes it big in the oil business.

In part three, we meet David Mahoney, a spoiled, self-centered young man, the product of his father’s and grandfather’s successes. David’s story holds the most hope as the reader witnesses his collapse into poverty. In many ways, David ends up where his grandfather began. David is forced to grapple with the realities of life in the 1920s. From the soup lines of the Great Depression to the racial strife of the deep South, David finds himself and the soul of the Mahoney clan.

Joyce produces strong characters with dialog that plunks the reader in the middle of the action. Also, look for the many historical references liberally sprinkled throughout this novel. As a nation built from the blood, sweat, and tears of immigrants, this book should remind us all of who we are as Americans.

My Rating ~

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*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

About the Author ~

Andrew Joyce left home at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written seven books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Other books by Andrew Joyce

Amazon Author Page

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How to Connect with Author, Andrew Joyce

Twitter: @HuckFinn76 

Facebook: Andrew Joyce (Yellowhair1850)

Connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com

And read some historical fiction with a western flair!
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Conversations With Colleen: Meet Author, Andrew Joyce

Conversations With Colleen

Hello everyone! This week I’m thrilled to bring you another fabulous author, Andrew Joyce. I asked him to pick a few questions from my huge list HERE.

We all aspire to be successful writers and the best way to learn some of the tricks of the trade is to ask questions. Learning from the experiences of other authors is an added bonus!


Please meet my guest, Andrew Joyce. I’ve been an avid reader of his books for a few years now. Andrew’s writing reminds me of the Louis L’Amour westerns I read in my teens.

My favorite book in Andrew’s repertoire is “Yellow Hair,” although I’ve enjoyed everything he’s written. You can read my review of this book HERE.

AndrewJoyce

Author, Andrew Joyce

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Joyce now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, Mahoney: A Dream Realized.

Hi, Colleen. Thanks so much for this interview. I’m ready to share some authorly wisdom.

Share away, Andrew. What advice would you like to give to aspiring writers?

There is one bit of advice that I have for aspiring authors. And that is, if you want to write well, you must read. Reading to a writer is as medical school is to a doctor, as physical training is to an athlete, as breathing is to life. Think of reading books like taking a writing course. I would suggest reading the classics: Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and, of course, Steinbeck, to name but a few.

*Below are three examples of Steinbeck’s writing. If you read stuff like this, you can’t help but become a better writer. Please note that the first example is one long sentence that makes up an entire paragraph.

“The concrete highway was edged with a mat of tangled, broken, dry grass, and the grass heads were heavy with oat beards to catch on a dog’s coat, and foxtails to tangle in a horse’s fetlocks, and clover burrs to fasten in sheep’s wool; sleeping life waiting to be spread and dispersed, every seed armed with an appliance of dispersal, twisting darts and parachutes for the wind, little spears and balls of tiny thorns, and all waiting for animals and the wind, for a man’s trouser cuff or the hem of a woman’s skirt, all passive but armed with appliances of activity, still, but each possessed the anlage of movement.”—The Grapes of Wrath

“The afternoon came down as imperceptibly as age comes to a happy man. A little gold entered into the sunlight. The bay became bluer and dimpled with shore-wind ripples. Those lonely fishermen who believe that the fish bite at high tide left their rocks and their places were taken by others, who were convinced that the fish bite at low tide.”—Tortilla Flat

“June is gay—cool and warm, wet and shouting with growth and reproduction of the sweet and the noxious, the builder and the spoiler. The girls in the body-form slacks wander High Street with locked hands while small transistor radios sit on their shoulders and whine love songs in their ears. The young boys, bleeding with sap, sit on the stools of Tanger’s Drugstore ingesting future pimples through straws. They watch the girls with level goat-eyes and make disparaging remarks to one another while their insides whimper with longing.”—The Winter of Our Discontent

Now that’s some great writing. My first bit of advice is to read. My second: Never, ever, ever respond to a bad review.

Excellent advice. So, is there anything you are currently working on that may capture the interest of your readers?

Yes, there is something I am working on, and thank you for asking.

Here’s a synopsis of my latest effort, entitled Mahoney, to be published after the first of the year.

It started as a dream … a dream of a place where no one ever went hungry and fine Irish whiskey flowed from fountains, a land of good and plenty. But first, the nightmare had to be endured.

This is the story of the Mahoney clan. A story that starts in Ireland in 1849 and concludes in Washington D.C., in the year of our Lord, 1963. Three generations of Mahoneys take us on a journey through one hundred and fourteen years of American history. The history we all know about … and some we don’t. The story is told in three parts.

(If this were a movie pitch, I’d say Mahoney is Gone with the Wind meets East of Eden. Maybe with a little How the West Was Won thrown in for good measure. I’m not saying I’m on a par with those writers, but story-wise and in scope, Mahoney is similar.)

Mahoney sounds exciting. I’m thrilled that you are sharing some of the story with us. Thank you!

Devin

In the second year of An Gorta Mhór—the Great Famine—nineteen-year-old Devin Mahoney, the descendant of kings, lies on the dirt floor of his small, dark cabin, waiting for Death to lead him out of this world of misery. He has not eaten in five days. His entire family has preceded him in death, one at a time, as the hunger grew. He is the last of the Mahoneys.

To be rid of him and open the land up for grazing, Devin’s landlord offers him a ticket to America. With no other options available, Devin agrees to leave his beloved Ireland. But he has a dream that one day he will return a rich man and he and his descendants will never go hungry.

After surviving disease and storms at sea that decimate crew and passengers alike, Devin’s ship limps into New York Harbor three days before Christmas, 1849. He starts his new life and things seem to be going well until he runs afoul of a local gang and has to run for his life. He finds his way to Pennsylvania and goes to work laying track for the railroad.

Although he fights against it, Devin falls in love. He tells himself that he is in America to get rich and go back to Ireland, not to take on a wife. However, love wins out and Devin marries the beautiful Mary Callahan, also an immigrant from the ol’ sod.

Devin works hard and is promoted time and time again until he is earning enough to build his and Mary’s dream house. In 1860, their son, Dillon, is born, and the Mahoney household is one happy family indeed. The American Dream is within reach.

But then the Civil War intervenes. Devin believes it’s his duty to fight to free the slaves. Mary begs him not to go off to war, but Devin has a ready answer, “Sweet Mary, I was a slave all my life. My entire family were slaves. We were bonded to the landlord … I cannot live in this land any longer while other men are held in chains.”

Mary learns of the horrors of war from the letters Devin sends home. He is a prolific writer and writes in great detail of what he has seen on his march south, the battles he has been in, and the mundane life of a soldier between battles. Mary lives for his letters until she receives a final letter, not from Devin, but from the Department of War, telling her of Devin’s heroic death during the Battle of Fredericksburg. However, Devin’s dream will live on through his son, Dillon.

Dillon

As he’s growing up, Dillon’s mother inspires him with stories of what his father had to go through to get to America, and once here, what it took to just get a start.

At age twenty, Dillon’s mother dies. The year is 1880. Dillon, at loose ends, sells the house and boards a train for California. He is anxious to experience the flavor of the Wild West, so during a water stop in the small town of Slow Water, Wyoming, he leaves the train to soak up the local atmosphere. While sipping whiskey in a saloon, he is taunted and physically assaulted by the killer Luke Short. Only by the intervention of a former lawman is his life spared. Vowing to settle things with Short, Dillon stays behind as the train continues on its westward journey.

He knows he cannot take on Short until he toughens up and learns something about guns. The former lawman, now El Segundo on a cattle ranch, offers Dillon a job as an assistant cook for an upcoming cattle drive, with the promise to teach him how to use a six-shooter so he’ll have at least a fighting chance when he goes up against Short.

By the time he returns from the cattle drive, Dillon is proficient with a gun. However, he has calmed down some and decides to let things be. But Short has other ideas and ambushes Dillon, leaving him for dead.

When he recovers, Dillon goes out after Short. Along the way and through no fault of his own, he has to face down another infamous killer, Heck Thomas. Dillon beats him to the draw and word spreads that there’s a new fast gun in the territory. Finally, in the little town of Taos, New Mexico, Dillon has his showdown with Short. With Short’s death, Dillon now has a reputation and every two-bit gunslinger is looking to add a notch to his gun by taking down Dillon Mahoney, the man who bested Luke Short and Heck Thomas. Dillon wants nothing to do with that kind of life and heads for California where he is not known.

In California, he strikes it rich in the oil business. He marries and has a son, David. Sadly, his wife dies in childbirth, and Dillon is left to raise his son by himself. Out of misplaced guilt for David not having a mother, Dillon spoils the boy rotten.

At the age of twenty-one (1917), an angry David has a falling out with his father and relocates to New York City, where he lives off an inheritance from his maternal grandfather. By 1930, he has squandered his inheritance and goes home to California to ask for monetary help. But Dillon, now seventy years old and dying of cancer, has lost all his money during the crash of ’29. When Dillon is unable to help, David curses his father and heads back to New York and an uncertain future.

David

David’s decline is swift and painful. His friends won’t lend him money and start avoiding him. He eventually is forced to give up his resplendent flat on Park Avenue and moves into a small, cramped apartment. Before long he cannot afford even that and is thrown out onto the street where he becomes acquainted with flophouses and soup kitchens.

Months later, a despondent David meets a freelance journalist who offers him a job as a kind of assistant, traveling the South. The journalist is investigating why a town that had a population of three hundred and fifty-five “Negroes” according to the 1920 Census, had, by 1930, not a single black resident (a true story). David, weary of life on the streets, eagerly accepts the job.

The citizens of the town warn the Yankees away, but when the stubborn Yankees persist in their investigation, drastic steps are employed by the town’s people to preserve their secret. Dillon and his employer barely escape with their lives.

The experience matures David, and at thirty-six he is finally a man. He now feels an affinity for the poor and downtrodden, a class of people he once despised. He next wants to tell the story of the farmers’ suffering through the dust storms of Oklahoma.

To quote Tom Joad:

“I’ll be aroun’ in the dark. I’ll be everywhere … wherever you look. Wherever there is a fight so hungry people can eat, I’ll be there. Wherever there is a cop beatin’ up a guy, I’ll be there. I’ll be there in the way kids laugh when they’re hungry and they know supper’s ready.”

That becomes David’s cause. Wherever there are people fighting for their rights, for the right not to go to bed hungry, for the right of a decent wage for an honest day’s work, for the right not to be discriminated against because of the color of their skin, David is there. He appears at some of the pivotal moments of social change of the early to mid-twentieth century.

David has gone from a spoiled rich kid to a fighter for human rights for all, not just for the rich and powerful. At sixty-eight years of age, he is present as Martin Luther King gives his “I Have a Dream” speech, which harkens back to what he had heard about his grandfather.

My grandfather’s dream dies with me. But others also have dreams. And their dreams will come true; it’s where the world is headed.

With tears in his eyes, David turns from the throng listening to King’s speech and slowly walks away, knowing that even though the first half of his life had been a complete waste, the second half was spent helping people—people like his grandfather—attain their dreams. And even though he has no family of his own on which to bestow his dreams, his life was a life well spent.

***

Thanks for sharing the news of your upcoming novel, “Mahoney,” Andrew. I can’t wait to read more. Mark your calendars, everybody. January is just around the corner.

 

AJ Visual SMALL

Amazon Author Page US: Andrew Joyce

 

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How to connect with Andrew Joyce

Twitter: @HuckFinn76 

Facebook: Andrew Joyce (Yellowhair1850)

Connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com

 

k luv u bye Thanks for stopping by to meet Andrew Joyce. ❤

Fairies, Myths, & Magic – Now Available in Print!

I’m happy to share that Fairies, Myths, & Magic is now available in a paperback version for the low price of $5.99 each on Amazon. I’m still in that 72-hour window on Amazon, so here is my Amazon Author Page where both editions are listed.

This book would make a great gift for all those summer birthday parties you still have to attend. By the way, There will be a second volume dedicated to the Winter Solstice, available in early December. ❤

I would like to thank D. G. Kaye, Diana Peach, Dan Greenwell, Andrew Joyce, and Balroop Singh for their rave reviews of Fairies, Myths, & Magic. Your kind words found their way into the advanced praise section of this book and on the back cover. Thanks for your kindness! You guys are the best! ❤

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Image Credit: purehappylife.com

 

Do it SO… what are you waiting for? Get your copy now!

 

Colleen’s 2018 #Book #Reviews – “Ellis,” by Andrew Joyce

book reviews

Title: Ellis – One Man’s Remarkable Life

Amazon Author Page: Andrew Joyce

Publication Date: February 6, 2018

Formats: Paperback & Kindle

Genres: Adventures & Explorers, Travelers & Explorers, Biographies & Memoirs 

Goodreads

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

From a rich tradition—from a fearless and audacious heritage—came forth a man who would be the embodiment of the Gloucester fisherman.

Ellis Hodgkins caught his first bluefin tuna at the tender age of fourteen, using only a hand line. It weighed 750 pounds. He did it by himself, fishing out of a ten-foot skiff. That feat earned him the title of Boy Wonder in and around Gloucester.

For those who marvel at the deeds of the men of Wicked Tuna, Ellis did it all before those guys were born.

This is the true story of one man’s remarkable life—a life lived on its own terms.

“Ellis is my hero.”—Dave Carraro of Wicked Tuna

MY RECOMMENDATION:

Andrew Joyce is an American historical fiction author who creates tales as large as the characters in his books, and Ellis Hodgkins is definitely one of those characters.

At fourteen, Ellis caught his first bluefin tuna by hand, which was no easy task considering the fish weighed over 750 pounds. That single feat of strength initiates the teen on a path to fame and fortune.

“Ellis,” is the character study of a man motivated by an inner determination to succeed which follows him throughout all the stages of his life. Descended from tough Gloucester fishermen, Ellis is constantly evolving and changing which I found to be part of his allure. This young man embraces change. He has the foresight to recognize the big picture in many of his adventures resulting in even more opportunities. Nobody could ever say Ellis was a slacker.

Andrew Joyce follows the path of Ellis’ life journey in three acts, incorporating a rich historical perspective which serves to set the scene for each new location. I loved the history of the Seminoles in South Florida. Those historical tidbits were woven into Ellis’ story bringing a sense of the past to the future.

I’m not much of a sailor, but if you love sailing, this book contains rich descriptions that will put you in the middle of the action.  I also loved the ending which inferred that Ellis’ story isn’t yet finished.

The book is a quick read, more the size of a novella, which is perfect for bedtime reading. At $.99 for the Kindle version, it is well worth the price. Drop anchor and have a read!

 

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 Fairies

5 fairies

*I follow the Amazon Rating System*

Colleen's Book ReviewsRating System

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Author, Andrew Joyce

About the Author:

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer.

Joyce has written five books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Joyce now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, Mahoney: An American Story.

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How to Connect with the Author:

You can find Andrew on Twitter @HuckFinn76 and on Facebook at Andrew Joyce (Yellowhair1850), and you can also connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com.

night time readingNight time reading you will enjoy!

 

Thanks for stopping by to meet Andrew Joyce, and to hear about his book, Ellis. I can’t wait to see what Andrew is writing next! ❤

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Are you looking for more great reads? Join author, D.G. Kaye, and myself in our Facebook group, The Literary Diva’s Library to find book reviews, book promotions, & special deals on books from authors you love.

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Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “Bedtime Stories for Grown-Up’s,” by Author, Andrew Joyce

  • Title: Bedtime Stories for Grownups
  • Amazon Author Page: Andrew Joyce
  • File Size: 4797 KB
  • Print Length: 689 Pages
  • Publisher: W. Birch & Assoc.
  • Publication Date: September 21, 2017
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B075V8XNTC
  • ISBN-10: 0998119350
  • ISBN-13: 978-0998119359
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Anthologies & Literature Collections

    *I was given a pre-publication copy of this book by the author for review purposes*

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

“Bedtime Stories for Grown-Ups is a jumble of genres—seven hundred pages of fiction and non-fiction … some stories included against the author’s better judgment. If he had known that one day they’d be published, he might not have been as honest when describing his past. Here is a tome of true stories about the author’s criminal and misspent youth, historical accounts of the United States when She was young, and tales of imagination encompassing every conceivable variety—all presented as though the author is sitting next to you at a bar, and you’re buying the drinks as long as he keeps coming up with captivating stories to hold your interest.

Comprised of 218,000 words, you’ll have plenty to read for the foreseeable future. This is a book to have on your night table, to sample a story each night before extinguishing the lights and drifting off to a restful sleep.

Mr. Joyce sincerely hopes that you will enjoy his stories because, as he has stated, “It took a lot of living to come up with the material for some of them.”

Andrew Joyce is the recipient of the 2013 Editor’s Choice Award for Best Western for his novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer.

His book Yellow Hair was awarded Book of the Year by Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 by Colleen’s Book Reviews.”

MY RECOMMENDATION:

Enter the creative and factual world of Andrew Joyce where imagination and memories collide in a spectacular volume of short and long stories. This book is a collection of many genres and styles. There is something here for everyone. And, that is one of the author’s gifts – the ability to write stories that capture everyone’s imagination.

I have to share with you that the true adventures the author lived through left me with some jaw-dropping moments. Be prepared for a wild ride. In these hitching tales, the author uses his real name, Billy Doyle, Andrew Joyce being his pen name. I think that fact made the stories even more terrifying for me. I couldn’t help but wonder what motivated the author’s wanderlust and later penchant for falling into tough situations. Yet, somehow, he managed to survive with the will to jump into another wild adventure. I can only attribute his gumption to being young and his willingness to experience life to the fullest.

A segment of the novel was skillfully written by the author’s dog, Danny. These heartwarming tales describe life with Andrew expressed with humor, love, and the kind of patience only our furry companions could have for their humans. Danny is a gem, and his stories are liberally sprinkled throughout this collection. I found that Danny’s take on life took the sting out of some of the real happenings recorded in this tome.

My favorite stories are always the tales of the old west. I’ve read and reviewed most of the author’s westerns: Molly Lee, Resolution, and Yellow Hair. Each novel is outstanding and written with historical facts that leap off the page.

In this collection, Joyce weaves old-fashioned western yarns with the skill of Louis L’Amour. He draws the reader back into time with him and suddenly you realize you are in the wild and often lawless west. I swear I could taste the dust and feel the heat of the old west wrap around me. The stories in this anthology are fabulous with a few new tales that I hadn’t read before.

There are too many stories to mention as the book is a long read. Some tales were quick, and others took a couple nights to read through. The entire volume took me a month of bedtime reading which shows the value and depth written into each of the stories. Don’t let the length deter you; instead read at your leisure, as I did.

I had a couple of favorites where I thought the author’s writing was spectacular, to say the least. He seemed to stretch his wings and venture into new writing territory. “How I became a Detective,” is one (although there are a few more tales related to this genre), and the other story was called, “Conversation with a Friend,” which was my favorite because of the message.

Bedtime Stories reads like a labor of love and a cleansing of the author’s soul. I’ve never read a collection of stories that lets you into the heart of the writer in this way. By the time you have finished the novel, you’ve walked beside the author and experienced life through his eyes which is a rare gift, indeed.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate:  5 out of 5 Fairies

five fairies


Author, Andrew Joyce

About the Author

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Joyce now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, Mahoney: An American Story.

How to Connect with the Author

You can find Andrew on Twitter @HuckFinn76 and on Facebook at Andrew Joyce(Yellowhair1850), and you can connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com.

night time readingNight time reading you will enjoy!

#Fairies, #Myths, & #Magic October Spooktacular Author Spotlight Guest Post – “Night Moves,” By Andrew Joyce

WELCOME… ENTER IF YOU DARE!

Happy October!

I have started a new feature on my blog, called Author Spotlight – Guest Posts. As you can see from the image above, I am looking for themed posts about fairies, myths, and magic. If you are an interested author and would like to be featured on my blog, please click HERE to find out more. ~Colleen~


My guest author today is Andrew Joyce who writes historical western fiction that transports you back to the glory days of the old west. He also writes some scary short stories that are so strange and unusual they might creep you out. Hang onto your seat, because he has a story to share with you!

Author, Andrew Joyce

My name is Andrew Joyce, and on occasion, I’ll write a book. I mean, what the hell? I ain’t got nothin’ else to do. But sometimes, when I’ll get struck by lightning … so to speak … I’ll write a short story. Going back a few years, I’ve been struck by lightning quite a lot.

Having all these stories lying around really irked my editor. So, for two years she’s been badgering me to put them into book form so people could read them. And for two years, I told her that would entail a lot of work, what with editing and everything.

Finally … she wore me down. Originally, Bedtime Stories for Grown-Ups was supposed to be a two-volume set. But I wanted to get it over with. Hence, I put them all into one tome (218,000 words—enough for three books!).

Half the stories are fiction, and half are nonfiction. As stated in the blurb, Bedtime Stories for Grown-Ups is a jumble of genres.

Here’s one story from my book. I hope you enjoy it.

Night Moves

By Andrew Joyce

They are always with me. At times they appear out of the ethereal mist, and other times they speak directly to my mind. I wish they would leave me to myself … but that they will not do. No, first I must do their bidding.

They come in the night and stay until the black sky fades to gray. When the stars leave the sky and the clouds to the east turn pink, I am allowed my rest. But I ask you, what respite can a murderer have? At their behest, I have killed again this night. And I will continue to kill until they go back from whence they came.

I remember the first time they came to me. It was a little over a year ago, and since then I have killed twenty-nine people. Please do not think me insane. I assure you these beings are real and not imminent. At first, I, too, thought myself demented and delusional when they stood before me, telling me they came to save the human race, and to accomplish their mission, certain people must die. They explained that the demise of the race was not impending, but if action was not taken, and taken soon, it would be too late to set things on a course to ensure the continuance of mankind.

You are probably wondering if you do not think me crazed, why they cannot do their own dirty work. That is a very good question and one I have asked of them. They, of course, are not of our time and space. They appear—when they appear—as diaphanous specters; they cannot manipulate physical matter. Thus, I have become their instrument here on earth. Where or when they are from, I do not know. And why out of all the billions on this planet, I was chosen, I know not. But it has been a long night, and I must sleep. I will continue this at a later date, and continue it I shall, for I want there to be a record of my actions and the reasons for them.

I am back. It has been two days since my last entry in this journal, and tonight they had me kill again. That makes thirty people—thirty innocent people … men, women, and children—I have dispatched from this world. Yes … I am sorry to say they have had me kill children. However, I was told that after tonight there would be no more need of my services. The human race was safe for the foreseeable future.

I refer to my tormentors as they or them because I do not know what they call themselves. Their form is vaguely human … two arms, two legs, and a head of sorts atop a torso, but their gossamer appearance precludes calling them human.

Tonight’s victim was a man in Moscow. I was directed to him and given his name. I then set about their business. I was told that his son, yet unborn, would one day invent something that would cause the death of billions. Being told the purpose for this particular death was a departure from the norm. I had never been given rhyme nor reason for any of the others. The man’s name and the names of the other twenty-nine, including where and when they died, are in the addendum attached to this missive. I remember every one of my quarries.

I guess I should have mentioned this earlier, but my victims were scattered around the world. I do not know how they did it, but one minute I was in my room behind a locked door, and the next minute I was standing in a foreign locale with the name of that night’s victim swirling through my brain. Then into my mind came the place I could find him or her in the city, town, or hamlet.

Now, the thirty-first person will die. They, at last, have left me to myself. I am now free to end this the only way it can be ended—with my death. I’ve been saving and hiding my medication for quite a while now; there is enough to kill me three times over. May God have mercy on my soul.

I affix my hand to this document this 3rd day of June in the year of our Lord 2017.

Signed,

Francis Fitzgerald

• • • • •

When Dr. Allen had finished reading the above, he turned to Dr. Harris and said, “Interesting, but why have you brought it to me? We both know that the man was a certified, delusional schizophrenic. How long have we had him here at our institution?”

Dr. Harris hesitantly answered, “He’s been here at Oakwood twelve years, sir.”

“Well, there you have it. It’s too bad he took his own life; it doesn’t help our reputation any, but these things happen.”

“Yes, sir. However, there is something I think you ought to know.”

“Yes?”

“I’ve taken the liberty of investigating a few of the names on Fitzgerald’s list. It’s taken me three weeks, but I’ve verified eleven of the deaths and their time and place. They all correspond with what Fitzgerald has written.”

Dr. Allen straightened in his seat, glanced at the papers in his hand, then looking Dr. Harris in the eye, forcefully said, “Preposterous! If there is any correlation, he read of the deaths in the newspaper or heard of them on the television.”

“Excuse me, sir, but Fitzgerald had no access to newspapers. He was denied them because they would agitate him to no end. And the only television he had access to was in the day room where the set is perpetually tuned to a movie channel.”

“That still does not give credence to this fairytale,” said Dr. Allen, waving the Fitzgerald papers in Dr. Harris’ direction.

“No, sir, it does not. However, there is one more thing I think I should make you aware of. My sister is married to a Russian physicist, speaks fluent Russian, and lives in Moscow. I called her about the last name on Fitzgerald’s list. She made a few calls for me, and it turns out that Fitzgerald was dead before the body of the man he mentions was discovered. And just one more thing, sir. The man’s wallet was found in Fitzgerald’s room. I have it if you’d like to see it.”

Turning a color red that is not in the regular spectrum, Dr. Allen shouted, “NO! I DO NOT WANT TO SEE THE DAMN WALLET!” Handing the Fitzgerald papers to Dr. Harris and with ice in his voice, he said, “Burn these, burn them now. And, if you value your position here at Oakwood, you will never speak of this matter again … to anyone. Do I make myself clear?”

Dr. Harris accepted the papers with a meek, “Yes, sir,” and walked out of the room. When he was in the hall and by himself, he muttered, “I’ll be goddamned … the old bastard is afraid.”

But Dr. Harris did not burn the papers. He placed them, along with the wallet, in his desk drawer and locked it. He had some thinking to do. As he started on his rounds, a quote of Shakespeare’s kept repeating itself in his head. “There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

©2017 Andrew Joyce

More about the author:

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until years later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books. His first novel, Redemption: The Further Adventures of Huck Finn and Tom Sawyer, was awarded the Editors’ Choice Award for Best Western of 2013. A subsequent novel, Yellow Hair, received the Book of the Year award from Just Reviews and Best Historical Fiction of 2016 from Colleen’s Book Reviews.

Joyce now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, Mahoney: An American Story.

If you enjoyed this story, please check out his new book below.

❤ CONNECT WITH ANDREW JOYCE ❤

You can find Andrew on Twitter @HuckFinn76 and on Facebook at Andrew Joyce (Yellowhair1850). Connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com.

Silver is whipping up some magic

Stop by and tell us what you are whipping up, I mean writing today?

My First Ever Book Review

I am honored to have Andrew Joyce review my book. The fairies are all abuzz this morning! ❤

Andrew Joyce

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This book was recommended to me by a friend and I must admit that it’s not my usual kind of read. But I thought I’d give it a chance. Right off the bat, I had two favorite characters, Abby and Sam. The author drew me in with good writing, excellent pacing, and an antagonist that had me turning pages at an alarming rate. I had to find out what the dastardly villain would do next!

Our hero, Abby, has a lot to contend with. Her mother has died some time ago and her father has now disappeared. She is shipped off to a new town where she’ll have to start a whole new life. All this in the first few pages. But then her problems really begin.

My only regret is that I don’t have a young daughter to share this with. This is the perfect book for young girls…

View original post 83 more words

Colleen’s #BOOK #REVIEWS – “Yellow Hair,” by Andrew Joyce

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  • Title:  Yellow Hair
  • Author: Andrew Joyce
  • File Size: 1092 KB
  • Print Length: 498 Pages
  • Publisher: William Birch & Assoc.
  • Publication Date: September 28, 2016
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN:  B01LXOXHBI
  • ISBN-10: 0998119318
  • ISBN-13: 978-0998119311
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, Biographical

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*I voluntarily reviewed an Advanced Reader’s Copy of this book*


“Through no fault of his own, a young man is thrust into a new culture just at the time that culture is undergoing massive changes. It is losing its identity, its lands, and its dignity. He not only adapts, he perseveres and, over time, becomes a leader–and on occasion, the hand of vengeance against those who would destroy his adopted people.

Yellow Hair documents the injustices done to the Sioux Nation from their first treaty with the United States in 1805 through Wounded Knee in 1890. Every death, murder, battle, and outrage written about actually took place. The historical figures that play a role in this fact-based tale of fiction were real people, and the author uses their real names. Yellow Hair is an epic tale of adventure, family, love, and hate that spans most of the 19th century. This is American history.”

Yellow Hair is an action-packed epic saga sharing the life story of a man coming to grips with his destiny. From the first page of this book, the reader is thrust inside the life journey of Jacob Ariesen, a young man whose family was looking for a better way of life in California. Leaving Massachusetts behind, and heading west on the Oregon Trail, the Arisen’s meet up with a wagon train headed to California in the mid-1800’s and set out toward gold country.

Most of the travelers were Eastern businesspeople, and they weren’t prepared to face the hardships on the trail. Careless errors of judgment by the pioneers results in the deaths of many family members. The people were greenhorns and had no clear idea what they had gotten themselves into. Throw in a crippling bout of cholera, and you have a clear picture of the tribulations suffered by the brave folks who traveled West looking for a better way of life. In the blink of an eye, Jacob’s entire family is wiped out, and he becomes the sole survivor.

With the dead and dying all around him, Jacob Ariesen becomes infected with cholera, and his days are numbered. Help is at hand, when a prophetic Native American woman, named Suni, finds her destiny with the fair-haired Jacob. Suni nurses him back to health, and she calls him, “Yellow Hair.” With no family of his own, Yellow Hair embraces the Dakota tribe who adopts him. He learns to speak the native languages of the Great Plains Indians and lives his life as a member of the Dakota tribe.

Jacob Ariesen, a.k.a. Yellow Hair takes his place in history framed by the U.S. government’s policy of placing the Dakota Sioux Indian tribes onto reservations after breaking treaty after treaty with the native peoples. The rest of the story belongs to Yellow Hair, told from his point of view.

I felt both sides (Native American and Whites) were portrayed as accurately as history could allow. The difference is in perspective, when you the reader, have the chance to witnesses the historical events through the eyes of a white man who considers himself to be an Indian.

I thought the author, Andrew Joyce, was entirely fair in his depiction of all the events. I never felt one side was glorified over another. The historical facts are woven in between the author’s interpretation of the events making history come alive.

History has a way of repeating itself, and I was quite moved with the parallels between the novel, and real life events unfolding at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and the Dakota Access Pipeline. I must admit I shed a few tears at the brutality of humanity on both sides of the spectrum.

I enjoyed this book from start to finish and could not put it down. And, as the author reminds us, “This is history,” which means many of these happenings are hard to swallow from a humanitarian point of view.

This is one of my favorite books from my expanding library of Andrew Joyce novels. If you love historical fiction set in the American West, you will love Yellow Hair.


Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars

5gold-star3

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Author, Andrew Joyce

About Andrew Joyce:

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until decades later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books, including a two-volume collection of one hundred and forty short stories comprised of his hitching adventures called BEDTIME STORIES FOR GROWN-UPS (as yet unpublished), and his latest novel, YELLOW HAIR. He now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, MICK REILLY.

You can find Andrew on Twitter @HuckFinn76 and on Facebook at Andrew Joyce (Yellowhair1850) and you can connect with Andrew on his author blog at andrewjoyce.wordpress.com

winter-is-coming

 

 

 

READ MORE BOOKS!

Silver’s #BOOK REVIEWS -“Resolution,” BY AUTHOR, Andrew Joyce

  • Title:  Resolution: Huck Finn’s Greatest Adventure
  • Author: Andrew Joyce
  • File Size: 724 KB
  • Print Length: 370 pages
  • Publisher: William Birch & Assoc.
  • Publication Date: April 13, 2016
  • Sold by Amazon Digital Services, LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B01E83YVJA
  • ISBN-10: 0692670904
  • ISBN-13: 978-0692670903
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Action & Adventure, Historical Fiction, Biographical

*The author provided me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review*


“It is 1896 in the Yukon Territory, Canada. The largest gold strike in the annals of human history has just been made; however, word of the discovery will not reach the outside world for another year. By happenstance, a fifty-nine-year-old Huck Finn and his lady friend, Molly Lee, are on hand, but they are not interested in gold. They have come to that neck of the woods seeking adventure. Someone should have warned them, “Be careful what you wish for.” When disaster strikes, they volunteer to save the day by making an arduous six hundred mile journey by dog sled in the depths of a Yukon winter. They race against time, nature, and man. With the temperature hovering around seventy degrees below zero, they must fight every day if they are to live to see the next. On the frozen trail, they are put upon by murderers, hungry wolves, and hostile Indians, but those adversaries have nothing over the weather. At seventy below, your spit freezes a foot from your face. Your cheeks burn—your skin turns purple and black as it dies from the cold. You are in constant danger of losing fingers and toes to frostbite. It is into this world that Huck and Molly race. They cannot stop. They cannot turn back. They can only go on. Lives hang in the balance—including theirs.”


I first met, Molly Lee McMasters in Andrew Joyce’s book entitled Molly Lee, the second volume in his Tom Sawyer-Huckleberry Finn adventure series. I fell in love with her character and style. Click HERE to read my review.

I was excited when Resolution came out and as usual, the author did not disappoint! Molly and Huck are so believable, I expected them to walk off the pages and shake my hand.

Resolution is the third book in the series and in my humble opinion, my favorite. Do you remember reading Call of the Wild, by Jack London when you were a kid? I must have read that book at least ten times. I enjoy a book where an animal becomes an entire piece of the narrative.

Let’s put it this way… A new star was born from the pages of this novel and his name is “Bright,” a Husky, and the lead sled dog. The personality of the dog shines throughout the novel. Huck and Bright share a special bond. This story would not have been the same without Bright leading the path back to civilization.

However, you can’t help but love the characters of Molly and Huck. They are the true heroes we think of staring in American westerns. Both characters are propelled through life by the morality and code of the old west. When they give their word, they mean it and they don’t abandon their friends, no matter who they may be.

One of my favorite things about Andrew Joyce’s writing is his use of rich descriptions. Through his accounts, I was transported back in time to 1896 Alaska. The gold rush had barely begun and trappers abandoned their traps for the lure of easy money. The visuals of the wilderness, the weather, and the people Huck and Molly met along the way were stunning.

Here is an example of a description that took my breath away:

“…It had stopped snowing by the time twilight crept over the mountain. In gloaming’s grayness, one of the prominences of snow moved slightly. Without warning, as a volcano, it erupted and the man sat upright, throwing off his blanket of snowfall…”

When I read a novel, I want to close my eyes and imagine myself in that setting. Andrew Joyce’s skills in storytelling lead the reader on an amazing adventure where all of your senses come into play. In fact, I have one of those reading hangovers. You know, when the writing touches you and you miss the characters and the story…

Thank goodness, Yellow Hair, another Andrew Joyce historical western is soon to be published. To peak your curiosity, I want to share the author’s note about the new book:

“Every death, murder, battle and outrage that I write about in this book actually took place—from the first to the last. The historical figures that play a role in my story were real people and I used their real names. I conjured up my protagonist only to weave together the various events conveyed in this fact-based tale of fiction.

This is American history.

Andrew Joyce”

Stay tuned! You are going to love Resolution!


Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars

Author, Andrew Joyce

About Andrew Joyce:

Andrew Joyce left high school at seventeen to hitchhike throughout the US, Canada, and Mexico. He wouldn’t return from his journey until decades later when he decided to become a writer. Joyce has written five books, including a two-volume collection of one hundred and forty short stories comprised of his hitching adventures called BEDTIME STORIES FOR GROWN-UPS (as yet unpublished), and his latest novel, YELLOW HAIR. He now lives aboard a boat in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, with his dog, Danny, where he is busy working on his next book, tentatively entitled, MICK REILLY.

You can find Andrew on his blog, called Andrew Joyce.wordpress.com, on Twitter @huckfinn76, and on Facebook at Andrew Joyce

Danny the Dog, part-time writer

Don’t forget to follow Andrew’s sidekick, Danny the Dog on Facebook, too. (He wants his share of the attention because he helps do the writing… :D)

Silver’s Birthday TEA Party

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Hello, and good day! Welcome to my birthday tea party! Much like the weekend coffee sharing event from Part-Time Monster, my monthly tea party is where I want to catch up with friends, old and new! This is also a way for me to introduce you to some great new blogs and people that I have virtually met along the way! In addition, I want to share my great love of tea, and all things TEA!

April is a special month for me. My oldest granddaughter was born on April 14th, and our 31st wedding anniversary is on April 16th! The main event, of course, is my birthday on April 18th! WOO-HOO!

Silvers Beddian Birthday

In fact, today, I am celebrating my Beddian Birthday! That means I was born in 1958 and am celebrating my 58th birthday! I found out about this rare phenomenon from my friend, Mark Bialczak on his blog last year when he turned 57… Yup, you got it! He was born in 1957!

Click here to see all the people born in 1958! Wow, I was born in the same year with some great company!

The day on which you turn the same age as the last two digits in your birth year is called your Beddian birthday. It is named for Bobby Beddia, a New York City firefighter who first came up with the idea. If you want to more about how this birthday is figured you can check out Clay Thompson, an Arizona Republic Columnist who wrote a great piece about the different birthday celebrations we can have.

Mark Bialczak shares the origination of this birthday name and I have quoted his writing from his blog post here:

“A Nov. 12, 2007, piece in the New Yorker by Lizzie Whiddicombe chronicled a visit to a New York City firehouse in which mathematician Rhonda Roland Shearer met a firefighter who said he was quite lucky because, at age 53 and born in 1953, he was quite lucky to be living in his birth year.

Whiddicombe caught Shearer’s enthusiasm at seeing “a mathematician’s look of wonder” on the firefighter’s face and noted how she immediately made plans to work on his theorem.

Tragically, unbelievably, sadly, Beddia was killed fighting a fire later that day.

But Shearer kept working on his notion, and finally, the idea got to math writer Barry Cipra, of Minnesota. He found that nobody had ever officially noted the age-birth year match, so he wrote a paper on the only-in-odd-year occurrence and called it the Beddian Birthday.”

Birthday cake!

So, come on! Let’s celebrate! I GOT cake! 😀

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And a Grandbaby Surprise! This is Arianna. ❤

Since I last talked with all of you in March, I have been busy! My Swamp Fairy story is coming along nicely and I am on the push to get it done! This is a short tea party this month since I have so much celebrating to do.

My friend, Erika Kind has graciously accepted my invitation to share her experiences with Matrix-Transformation. I really enjoy Erika’s work and how she tries to enrich the lives of everyone around her.

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Thank you very much for inviting me to your tea-party today, Colleen. I am excited to share some information about my work with Matrix-Transformation and to explain what it is about.

I am convinced that a changed attitude to life can change its quality and the resulting manifestations within life. I experienced that myself when I transformed my life in changing my perspective. The matrix method enables a faster, more gentle, and straight transformation. It can literally adjust a different reality version. I am working with that Technique for two years and the results are truly stunning.

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What is Matrix-Transformation?

The method of consciously directing your reality is based on the teachings of Dr. Richard Bartlett (Matrix Energetics), Dr. Frank Kinslow (Quantum Physics) and Ulrich Kieslich (Matrix Transformation).

matrix transformation

The matrix, which our life is part of, is an interactive and currently interacting energy field. Every life is connected with each other life. The variety of reality variations is stored within this matrix too. That means everything that was, is, and will be – simply every possibility – is embedded.

In the personal matrix, we can find information about the physical body, our past, our belief system, our emotions, desires, thoughts, and even the soul itself.

Depending on our state of consciousness and the energy which radiates from it, we connect naturally with the same energy of one of the reality versions. The decision to perceive something differently is the conscious way of choosing a different reality version. The old reality collapses and new possibility is starting to manifest immediately. This new reality can be activated within seconds.

mind expansion

The method can be applied for all possible parts of life: blocking belief system, past trauma, systemic complexities, interpersonal entanglements, mental and physical problems,… The old realities can be solved and positive attributes can be integrated and intensified. Subjective problems, blocks, and fears can be discarded.

How does a treatment work?

First, the procedure is explained to the client. The therapist is constructively discussing, what the client wants to have changed, dissolved or intensified. Questions are clarified.

The process itself only takes a few seconds. The client has to focus on their subjects while the therapist activates the “switch” for the desired change. The effect can be felt like an energy wave which literally blows them off their feet. That’s why they have to stand in front of a couch. But most of all the feeling for the subject or situation has changed since a new reality version already exchanged the old one and starts to manifest. The memory of the old reality is still there but the perspective and the priority has changed dramatically.

Matrix training

The woman in the black T-shirt is the client and there are a chair and person behind her to catch her fall.

I want to point out that this experience requires much trust in the therapist. There must never be manipulations with third parties or any brainwashing. It is the responsibility of the therapist to protect the well-being of the client. The therapist must deny a treatment when realizing the low virtues of the client. The treatment is meant to help the client work things out faster.

I believe that here the basic programming of our soul’s plan cannot be manipulated. It only works when it is meant to be for the client. Otherwise, it either won’t work out or the effect will not endure. That’s why it basically cannot go wrong because whatever way we choose to reach our goals and destinations in life we will get there either way.

The Matrix-Technique is only another vehicle to get there more effective. The client still needs to take the responsibility for his life. Because when changes happen (with or without the Matrix-Technique) the client has to deal with those changes and consequences.

~*~

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Hi, I am Erika! I was born in Vienna but grew up in another part of Austria and in the Principality of Liechtenstein (within the Swiss alps) where I still live.  I am running a Practice for Aromatherapy and Self-Development. I am a singer and an author.

For a long time, I was dominated and controlled by fears and outside influences.  From teenage times to adulthood my life was overshadowed by destructive thought patterns. One day I stood up and started to face my fears one by one. My life changed completely.  Today I grab my chances and lead the life I always wished for. In order to share my wonderful insights I wrote I’m Free – Awareness of Who You Are by Discovering Who You Are Not!

When I started blogging in May 2014 I had no idea what this was about. I did it in order to promote my book and was trained therefore by my publisher. After 10 months of increasing and intensifying interactions, of finding dear friends all over the world, and so much love everywhere I changed again and so did my blog changed. It got so much more personal and has developed to a blog from soul to soul. It has become a place for everyone to pause for a moment, to lighten up the heart, to smile, to get inspired, and to fuel with good vibes.

We are all wonderful beings who came into this world in order to explore, discover, experience, create and simply enjoy the lifetime in a human body with all senses. I want you to open your heart in order to hear, see, and feel clearer about yourself, your life, and the world. Therefore, we need the happenings in our lives as signposts and tools. It is neither good nor bad – it simply is. Whatever happens has its reason in order to show us something or make us develop something. Life is simply all about living with everything it has in store for us.

I am not sitting on a cloud with an enlightened smile on my face all day long. I can be angry, stubborn, impatient, sad, and frustrated as well. But I know that these are characteristics which are part of my experience but not part of me. I am profoundly happy as a basic condition of my being. Therefore, I don’t deny negative feelings because I know that they will show me something in order to discover a new part of myself.

Reach out for the stars but only as high as your feet still touch the ground!

In Love and Light!

Stop by and visit with Erika. I know she will love it! Here’s where you can find Erika:

www.erikakind.com

www.erikakind.wordpress.com

www.facebook.com/AuthorErikaKind

www.twitter.com/AuthorErikaKind

Silver needs her tea

While I am drinking tea by the gallons, please take the time to check out my friend Andrew Joyce’s book, Resolution. Here is the amazon link to the book that has just been released!

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It is 1896 in the Yukon Territory, Canada. The largest gold strike in the annals of human history has just been made; however, word of the discovery will not reach the outside world for another year.

By happenstance, a fifty-nine-year-old Huck Finn and his lady friend, Molly Lee, are on hand, but they are not interested in gold. They have come to that neck of the woods seeking adventure.

Someone should have warned them, “Be careful what you wish for.”

When disaster strikes, they volunteer to save the day by making an arduous six hundred mile journey by dog sled in the depths of a Yukon winter. They race against time, nature, and man. With the temperature hovering around seventy degrees below zero, they must fight every day if they are to live to see the next.

On the frozen trail, they are put upon by murderers, hungry wolves, and hostile Indians, but those adversaries have nothing over the weather. At seventy below, your spit freezes a foot from your face. Your cheeks burn—your skin turns purple and black as it dies from the cold. You are in constant danger of losing fingers and toes to frostbite.

It is into this world that Huck and Molly race.

They cannot stop. They cannot turn back. They can only go on. Lives hang in the balance—including theirs.

You can find Andrew lurking around here at the following links:

Andrew Joyce’s Molly Lee

Danny on Facebook

Andrew on Facebook

Andrew’s Web Site

Thanks so much for dropping by to celebrate my birthday with me. I hoped you liked your tea and cake. I know I enjoyed our tea immensely and hope you come back next month! Meanwhile, we have to dig out of this blizzard!

Silver's snowed in!