Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 129 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Happy Spring Poetry!

Here are your two words for this week:

Hobby & Play

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your own blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks any longer – only from the submission form emails. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 126, “Poet’s Choice of Words”

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

It’s the first of the month. Use your creativity and have fun.

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always lovely too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site has as an extension you can install on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to write my poems. Click on the “Workshop tab.” You can cut and paste your poem in the box or do your composing right there.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me the opportunity to cut and paste your poems from the submission form emails into the Recap for publication on Monday.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I do not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks – only from the submission form. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap, please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #7 – CELEBRATE & WATCH

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be discontinued in the next few months)


Have you been looking for me? I’m working on my second book, The Meadow Fairy. During my first week, I’ve written a total of 8,373 words! I’m a bit behind but no matter – I’m going to keep writing!

LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THIS EXCITING POETRY FORM. Did these instructions help last week? Here they are again, as a reminder:

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem. It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

At Study.com, there is an excellent discussion on how to write a Tanka. This is part of a lesson you would have to pay for so I have quoted the best part of that site. I color coded the things for you to consider when writing your own Tanka:

“Tanka poems are a traditional Japanese style of poetry that follows a set pattern. In this lesson, you’ll learn the structure of the tanka, be introduced to its subject matter, and be presented with examples of this type of poetry.

Original Tanka Poetry Example

the color of the cherry blossom

has faded in vain

in the long rain

while in idle thoughts

I have spent my life.

– Ono no Komachi (circa 850) Original Japanese Tanka

See below for more directions

You may be familiar with haiku, a traditional style of Japanese poetry containing only three lines. The poem above is a tanka, another style of Japanese poetry. Tanka poems are quite similar to haiku, and in this lesson, you’ll learn how they are structured and what you might expect to find in a tanka poem.

Tanka Structure and Content

Tanka poems, when written in Japanese, follow a pattern of syllables 5-7-5-7-7. In other words, the first and third lines contain only five syllables each, while the second, fourth, and fifth lines have seven syllables. When translated into English the syllable count is usually thrown off, which is why our example has nine syllables in the first line. There would only be five in the original Japanese version.

Additionally, each tanka is divided into two parts. The first three lines are the upper phrase, and the last two lines are the lower phrase.

The upper phrase typically contains an image, and the lower phrase presents the poet’s ideas about that image

Many traditional poetic forms have a turn, a place where the poem shifts, and for the tanka, this happens between the upper and lower phrase. In our example, the poet presents an image of faded cherry blossoms, and after the turn, she compares her own life to the wasted beauty of those blossoms.

While haiku poems are usually about nature, tanka is often personal reflections on love and other strong emotions. Tanka also uses figurative language. In the example, above, the poet creates a metaphor connecting the wilted cherry blossoms to her life.”

My example:

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye? You end up with lines of syllables totaling, 5/7/5/7/7.

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to write your feelings into this poetry form.

I hope this helps to explain the “TURN,” or “PIVOT.” Remember: create an image in your mind with the first three lines, and in the last two lines give us your opinion or thoughts about that mind-picture.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use Fotoflexer, Picmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 6th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WIND & GRACE: (I hope you are visiting the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

#Tanka Challenge Wind and Grace  | Potholes in the Road of Life

Tanka Tuesday: Wind & Grace – Image & Word

Wind & Grace | thoughts and entanglements

Colleens Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 Wind & Grace | Annette Rochelle Aben

Test of Faith – Leara writes and other creative things…

Winds of Grace | The Poetry Channel

Wind and Grace #Tanka – ladyleemanila

storm clouds approaching | rivrvlogr

Tanka – Wind/Grace | Mother Willow

Grace | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Wind of Grace | imanikingblog

#Tanka Challenge 6 @ColleenChesebro – MEANINGS AND MUSINGS

Windswept to Grace | Stutter-Stepping Heart

Test of Faith – Leara Writes & Take Pics

Tanka Wind & Grace – Neel Writes Blog

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 Wind & Grace – Two on a Rant

Waving With Grace – Naa Prapancham, My World

Last Dance – Naa Prapancham, My World

The Graceful Winds of Love – Chasing Life & Finding Dreams

She Deserted his World & Left – Life at Seventeen

JOB!

Did those instructions help you to get the pivot last week? Here is a Tanka that was spot on!

Each week I am going to share a Tanka I thought was special BECAUSE it conveyed the author’s feelings.

The above Tanka is from Greg at Potholes in the Road of Life. I love how he got his feelings into the Tanka! ❤

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CELEBRATE & WATCH

 (any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

I got creative this week and used “applaud” for the word celebrate, and I used the word, “behold,” for the word, watch. There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

A seasonal change –
behold the cold winds blowing,
fingers of frost etched
against my dark window panes
I applaud nature’s artwork.

~Colleen Chesebro~

SHARE YOUR TANKA! IT’S TIME TO GET YOUR TANKA ON! ❤

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. ❤

Silver’s #BOOK #REVIEWS – “Enscribing the Heavens from This Side,” By Author, Ina Hamilton Hart

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  • Title:  Enscribing the Heavens from This Side
  • Author: Ina Hamilton Hart
  • Print Length: 186 Pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication Date: September 3, 2016
  • Sold by Amazon, LLC
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1530407133
  • ISBN-13: 978-1530407132
  • Formats: Paperback Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Memoirs, Biographies, Poetry

*I voluntarily reviewed an Advanced Reader’s Copy of this book for review purposes*


“Calling words her legacy, Ms. Hart has compiled a collection of posts from her Cronechronicler blog. The collection is a celebration of embracing change, aging gracefully, and the elegance of small moments of a life well-lived. Sprinkled with haiku and serendipitous meanderings, this book is for curious and delighted readers. This compilation covers almost two years of daily posts and chronicles past journeys to Europe, Cuba, Mexico, and Ghana.”


I was captivated by the name of this novel because of the unique spelling of the word “Enscribing.” I was interested to find out if this was a purposeful change or an accident as the usual spelling of the word is “Inscribing.” I pondered what exactly did it mean. When I questioned the author, she said, “Enscribe” is a technical term for code writing and actually fits writing across the broad sky.”

And, that is the essence of Ms. Hart’s writing. At the beginning of Chapter One, she includes a quote from David Whyte:

“Sometimes everything has to be enscribed across the heavens so you can find the one line already written inside you.

Sometimes it takes a great sky to find that small, bright, and indescribable wedge of freedom in your own heart.”

What follows is the joyful celebration of a life well-lived. This is the journey of a woman finding herself and understanding her purpose in our amazing universe. She shares that at the age of fifty-five, she made the decision to be known as an “original.” No longer does she want to only do what everyone expects of her. Instead, she intends to discover the person she had become.

So, in the summer of 2014, with the help of her grandson, Ms. Hart began her own blog called Crone Chronicler. She set out on a writing journey to discover her inner muse. Discover she did!

Ms. Hart skillfully weaves a unique blend of humor and wisdom throughout this novel. She writes in the style of a memoir, chronicling her many travels to England, France, Cuba, Mexico, and Ghana. Between these glimpses into the past, she sprinkles Haiku and poetry reflecting her interpretation of the present.

This was the perfect evening read. I loved her reminisces which were filled with love, self-discovery, and family. This collection is also an official celebration of a woman who has found herself and rediscovered her writing talent. It just goes to show that we can recreate ourselves at any age. I can relate to that, and I bet you will too.


Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 4
Reader Engagement: 4
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 4.5 out of 5 stars

4-5-stars

Author, Ina Hamilton Hart

About Ina Hamilton Hart:

At age seventy-five I moved to be near two of my three sons and their families. I intended to spend time getting to know and enjoying my grandchildren who live here. I didn’t expect to create a new life for myself as well. For the first time, I have space and time to let my old gift of writing flower and to make new friends with whom I share the absurdity of aging.

You can find Ina Hart on her blog, Crone Chronicler, at cronechronicler.wordpress.com

Thanks for stopping by to meet Ina. Stop by her blog. She will enjoy seeing you. ❤

and have a happy Sunday! ❤

Word Written in Verse – A Haiku

The Ronovan Writes #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #111 words for this week are: “Rhyme & Reason.”

I used verse for the word rhyme and purpose for the word reason.

Thanks for stopping by. See you next week,

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. ❤

Love, A Moral Compass – A Haiku

A Moral Compass

Thanks for stopping by. I’ll see you soon. ❤

073116_1847_VACATIONTim2.jpg

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. ❤

Trying to Stay Sleek – A Haiku

The RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #108 prompt words for this week are “Sizzle & Sleek.” Ohhh… those are perfect for August 1st. Wait! Is it August already? Where did all the time go? How can the summer be flying by so quickly?

Summer brings its own share of eating challenges for me every year. It is so hard to turn down, steak, salmon, potato salad… And the desserts! Oh, my goodness! I refuse to do it! Instead, I try to stay within my Weight Watchers points and enjoy the amazing bounty of summer.

Happy dog days of summer! Here in Colorado, the kids in my school district have gone back to school. The neighborhood is strangely quiet. I am back at editing. Have a great day everyone!

The Summer Heat Descends – A Haiku

It’s the time of the week I love! The RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #103 Summer&Fun! This week the words are summer and fun.

Early summer in Colorado has been spectacular. The days are warm, and the nights are cool. We have only used our air conditioner once so far. I love these nights with the windows open.

Last night, encouraged by the heat of the afternoon, a thunderstorm rolled down from Pikes Peak. Thunder rumbled and echoed through the meadows and fields surrounding our neighborhood. Rain pelted the windows. Lightning flashed and disrupted my sleep.

After a few hours, it was gone, having played itself out; leaving a cool breeze to push the curtains out into the middle of the room. It was then, I heard the yipping sounds, from a pack of coyotes, as they roamed the nearby fields pursuing their prey. It was a wild sound which haunted my dreams. The meadow fairies called to me and whispered tales from long ago…

Thanks for stopping by! See you next week.

Astrological Grudges – A Haiku

The RonovanWrites #Weekly #Haiku #Poetry Prompt #Challenge #102 words for this week are “birth and cheer.” These are some interesting words… Let’s see what I can come up with!

To keep things interesting, I used “shout” for cheer and “natal” for birth.

I saw this great visual on Facebook about how long each of the astrological signs holds a grudge. I just had to share it! How about a little astrological humor this week? My haiku is not up to form this week, but let’s have some fun…

Image from Facebook: Astrology Answers

Natal charts don’t lie

How long do you hold a grudge?

Shout out your birth sign!

Colleen M. Chesebro


I am Aries, the Ram! It’s true. I do have a temper but it doesn’t last long! In fact, it usually is gone quickly. How about you?

Thanks for stopping by! See you on Sunday for Ronovan’s Haiku Wrap UP!