“Hazy Moon,” #Haiku, #NaPoWritMo

Spring has found its way to Michigan… The temperature hit 80 degrees F. today. Yet, the clouds are rolling in. Rain is on the way… it matches my mood. A dear friend’s husband lost his battle to cancer today. Like the spring rain, my tears fall at the loss of another gentle soul. May he rest in everlasting peace.

Image by ThePixelman from Pixabay
hazy moon—
keep the umbrella close
showers grow weeds

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

“Spring Blessings,” #haiku, #NaPoWritMo, #spring

Today, we finished the last of our indoor house painting… I’m so glad to be done! Let’s celebrate Spring!

cold rain falls—
tulips bloom in splendor
spring blessings

©2012 Colleen M. Chesebro

It’s day three of my haiku mindfulness journey! Happy Easter! ❤

“neko no koi,” Cats in Love, #haiku, #haiga, #NaPoWritMo

First I’ll give you the haiku. The kigo is “cats in love” (neko no koi) which signifies spring.

cats in love—
howls under the moon
rite of spring

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Let’s talk about haiga poetry. This is poetry that combines three forms: imagery, photographs or original art, and calligraphy. If you use a photo and add your haiku or senryu to it, it then becomes a haiga, subject to the rules of that form.

Haiga is written in the short-long-short syllable form or for my poetry challenge, the 5-7-5 form.

The most important part of a haiga… The image cannot complete the haiku or senryu. If you need the photo to get your message across, you’ve failed with your poem.

Remember, take the first and second lines of your haiku or senryu. Do they make sense? Then, take the second and third lines of your haiku or senryu. Do they add another layer of meaning to your poem? That is the juxtaposition you need to make your poem memorable.

Line one and two:

cats in love—howls under the moon

Line two and three:

howls under the moon, rite of spring

Each section of the haiku shares a different layer of meaning. Tell me, who hasn’t wanted to howl under the spring moon?

Now, let’s choose a photo and add our haiku:

Image by Susan Cipriano from Pixabay

The photo for this haiga gives us a glimpse of the moon along with a view of bare trees, signifying spring. You don’t need the photo, to understand the haiku. All the photo does is enhance the magic of the moon in springtime. Can you hear the cats howling?

Speaking of cats… the countdown has begun! On Monday, six-month-old Chloe, and four-month-old Sophie will become part of our family. They are a bonded pair we found at the Constellation Cat Cafe. We can’t wait to bring them home. ❤

“kaze hikaru,” Shining Wind, #haiku

Happy April! This is the first day of National Poetry Month, and my poem a day writing practice.

shining wind—
pink blossoms eddy
in moonbeams

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

My kigo is “shining wind” kaze hikaru in Japanese. I’ve followed a 3-5-3 syllable format.

April Showers Bring May Flowers

Blessed Ostara (Eostre)

Ostara, or Eostre, is the Germanic Goddess of the Dawn who is associated with spring and the Spring Equinox. This connection is made through the early English Christian monk Bede (673 – 735). It is believed that the naming of the Christian holy day, Easter, comes from that source. (John Beckett)

Today, I honor the Spring (Vernal) Equinox with a haiku written from the view outside my window this morning.

Image by Vinson Tan ( 楊 祖 武 ) from Pixabay
Dawn pinked sky glints
over barren tree silhouettes
robin song greets spring

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

Haiku & Senryu

Many thanks to Frank for hosting this challenge. This week, Frank J. Tassone’s Haikai Challenge is a Spring Trinity Challenge:

DateKigo
2/20remaining snow (zansetsu)
2/27Snow moon (Yuki no tsuki)
3/6waters warming (mizu nurumu)

Write the haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to any of these kigo .

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by jplenio from Pixabay

Remaining Snow (zansetsu) – haiku

From remaining snow—
purple crocus burgeoning
nature awakens

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Image by Pezibear from Pixabay

Snow Moon (Yuki no tuski) haiku

The snow moon glistens
betwixt endless tree shadows
wolf stalks his dinner

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Image by Peter Selbach from Pixabay

waters warming (mizu nurumu) senryu

still waters warming— 
I turn, craving your caress
your snores wake the dead

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“Still Cold (Yokan)” haiku

Frank Tassone is buried in three feet of snow! For his Haikai challenge #177, this week he asks us to write our favorite haikai poem (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) alluding to either:

  • Still Cold (yokan)/New Year (Shinnen)
  • Mardi Gras/Ash Wednesday

“Still Cold,” haiku

bright, blinding snowlight 
luminous snowflake crystals
crunching tires, still cold

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Photo by Egor Kamelev on Pexels.com

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki)” #haiku

Frank Tassone’s Haikai challenge asks us to celebrate by writing the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to either Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki), New Year’s Eve (toshi no yo), or New Year’s Day (ganjitsu).

Frank says:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

I started with a 2/3/2 haiku, a 3/5/3 haiku, and finished with a traditional 5/7/5 haiku all dedicated to the Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki).

***

Photo by Frank Cone on Pexels.com

Cold moon
hopes and dreams
fulfilled

Long night’s moon
darkness and cold hides
spring below

December Full Moon
myths awaken under stars
the goddess slumbers

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I’ve also added this sequence for Tanka Tuesday, where I asked everyone to write about hope. This is my last post for 2020. I’ll see you all in the new year in a new home in Michigan!

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

The Tanka Tuesday weekly poetry challenge will return January 19, 2021. All poets welcome! ❤

“Melancholy Autumn,” #Haiku

This week’s theme for our poetry challenge is a haiku written by Sue Vincent:

clouds cover the moon, 
beyond dawn's pale horizon 
sun rises unseen  

©2020 Sue Vincent

The idea is to use Sue’s haiku as inspiration for your own syllabic poetry. Remember, in this challenge we can use any of the following poetry forms:

Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Renga, Solo-Renga, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma

Image by imagii from Pixabay

silver mist conceals
shadows of past and present
cleansed by icy rain

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Let’s Talk About Haiku

HAIKU IN ENGLISH: Traditional Haiku in English is written in three lines with five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the last line: 5/7/5, for a total of seventeen syllables written in the present tense.

Haiku do not rhyme, nor do they contain metaphors and similes. The use of an implied metaphor is acceptable.

The current standards for creating Haiku in English suggest a form with three lines and syllables of 3/5/3 (11 syllables). Even the more abbreviated haiku version with three lines and syllables of 2/3/2 (7 syllables) is now thought of more favorably than the traditional 5/7/5 format. Hybrid haiku are written with seventeen-syllables in one or more lines.

Most haiku are written about nature, the seasons, a beautiful moment in nature, an emotional experience while in nature, or change. A haiku should share a special moment of awareness with the reader.

There is often a seasonal word used to explain the time of year, called a kigo, which is a seasonal description, such as: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, and New Year’s. There should only be one kigo per haiku. It’s up to the poet to decide if they want to include a kigo in their poem.

Most haiku do not contain titles.

The use of punctuation is optional in the creation of the haiku.

Three or more haiku written together are considered a series or sequence.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“The Illusion of Power,” tanka prose/haiku

Twirl your wands and cast your spells, for power exerted over others leads them to behave in ways they would not otherwise behave. The veil is thinning as the energy shifts. Be careful what you wish for…

“The Illusion of Power Spell”

On this Samhain eve of the full blue moon, I wait until midnight darkens the shadowy edges of the glen. I dip the tip of my right index finger into moon oil as I trace the shape of the orb on the flat surface of a nearby stump. Within the circle, I place four white candles around the edge, adding the fifth one in the middle. With a snap of my fingers, the candles are lit.

I call to the moon
 to receive her powers cast
 tonight, caught and kept
 used for good intent only
 that no evil shall arise.

Brilliant moon, may your 
 blessings and vitality
 live within my heart.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Happy Halloween!

Marsha picked the theme for this week’s Tanka Tuesday challenge. I broke my own poetry rules this week… and it was so fun! I started out with a bit of tanka prose, including the accompanying tanka. Next, I added the haiku at the end to round out this poem.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.