Blog Update 8/6/2020: “Cantaloupe” #haiku

As my Sister of the Fey, Debby Gies said to me, “Oy Vey, what a week it’s been! I apologize for all the blog craziness. WordPress is working through the issues and my posts have migrated over from the business plan. I’m still missing my Pages and featured images. Anyway, we’ll muddle through and I’ll keep cleaning up my blog. It was time to update some things, anyway.

In the meantime, here is a haiku for the Poet’s Choice Challenge with a kigo which means “season word” in Japanese. Kigo are used to define the time of the year, and they are valuable in providing economy of expression. Since haiku are mostly nature related, the use of a kigo sets the theme for your poem.

leaves kissed by the sun
lazy, hazy summertime
sweet melons ripen

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

In Phoenix, and my part of the desert in northern Buckeye, we’ve had gruesome heat. For over 32 days in a row we’ve recorded temperatures at 110 degrees F. or higher, breaking most of the old records. My garden has suffered and I’ve lost several plants even though they’re connected to the drip system in my back garden. I’ll wait until this fall to replace them.

On a whim, I threw out some cantaloupe seeds a few months back. Surprise! They sprouted and grew. I hope we get a few nice melons out of the batch.

Enjoy the rest of the rest of your week. The cover reveal for my new book, Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry is almost ready! Stay tuned.

Monday’s Walk, Traditional & Current #Haiku Forms #MondayBlogs

I didn’t get a chance to use the prompt words this week for my own poetry challenge, so please forgive me.

I left early for my walk this morning. My phone shared the news that the weather was a mild 55 degrees F. Yet, I knew better. The winds in western Arizona howl across the desert making it feel far colder than the numbers suggest. Without a second thought, I grabbed my winter coat.

As soon as I shut the front door, the first wind gust hit me. Hang onto your hats, I thought, this was going to be a difficult workout!

At the end of my street, I paused to listen to the musical cries of the coyotes brought to me on those same winter winds. I slipped on my gloves and plodded onward.

On the way back, I noticed how the wind rolled over the clouds, making them look like waves in an ocean.

I snapped this photo because it would produce a winter Haiku and I wanted to memorialize those clouds. First, a traditional Haiku:

alabaster clouds
whitecaps in a blue sky sea
winter winds in flux

In the 3/5/3 format:

winter clouds
waves in a sky sea
winds in flux

In the 2/3/2 format:

pale clouds
sky surf swells
winter

all Haiku forms: ©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Haiku are often written about nature. True Haiku uses a kigo – a seasonal word to help define the season. Can you pick out my kigo seasonal words? They are: winter winds, winter clouds, and winter.

Why do we use Kigo? Because these words help to bring the reader into your personal experience by sharing the season. Traditional Haiku always required the use of a kigo.

Check out Wikipedia.org to find more kigo to make your Haiku shine.

Brave the winter winds and write some Haiku!