#solo-renga, #haiku, #tanka

For Frank Tassone’s challenge, I used the kigo “midsummer rain” for challenge #195 to write a solo renga:

midsummer rain flows
rivulets run down the street
rainbow slicks glisten

the heady scent of wet earth
moisture adds a second skin

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

For challenge #196, “summer moon (natsu no tsuki) / Strawberry Supermoon, I wrote a (5-7-5) haiku:

summer moon glitter
long light snakes across the lake
twilight shadows swell

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

For challenge #197 smoldering hot (moyuru) I wrote a tanka:

smoldering hot day
brilliant sun scintillations
a twinkling mirage
blurring the straight pathway home
stay on the straight and narrow

© 2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

“Hazy Moon,” #Haiku, #NaPoWritMo

Spring has found its way to Michigan… The temperature hit 80 degrees F. today. Yet, the clouds are rolling in. Rain is on the way… it matches my mood. A dear friend’s husband lost his battle to cancer today. Like the spring rain, my tears fall at the loss of another gentle soul. May he rest in everlasting peace.

Image by ThePixelman from Pixabay
hazy moon—
keep the umbrella close
showers grow weeds

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

“neko no koi,” Cats in Love, #haiku, #haiga, #NaPoWritMo

First I’ll give you the haiku. The kigo is “cats in love” (neko no koi) which signifies spring.

cats in love—
howls under the moon
rite of spring

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Let’s talk about haiga poetry. This is poetry that combines three forms: imagery, photographs or original art, and calligraphy. If you use a photo and add your haiku or senryu to it, it then becomes a haiga, subject to the rules of that form.

Haiga is written in the short-long-short syllable form or for my poetry challenge, the 5-7-5 form.

The most important part of a haiga… The image cannot complete the haiku or senryu. If you need the photo to get your message across, you’ve failed with your poem.

Remember, take the first and second lines of your haiku or senryu. Do they make sense? Then, take the second and third lines of your haiku or senryu. Do they add another layer of meaning to your poem? That is the juxtaposition you need to make your poem memorable.

Line one and two:

cats in love—howls under the moon

Line two and three:

howls under the moon, rite of spring

Each section of the haiku shares a different layer of meaning. Tell me, who hasn’t wanted to howl under the spring moon?

Now, let’s choose a photo and add our haiku:

Image by Susan Cipriano from Pixabay

The photo for this haiga gives us a glimpse of the moon along with a view of bare trees, signifying spring. You don’t need the photo, to understand the haiku. All the photo does is enhance the magic of the moon in springtime. Can you hear the cats howling?

Speaking of cats… the countdown has begun! On Monday, six-month-old Chloe, and four-month-old Sophie will become part of our family. They are a bonded pair we found at the Constellation Cat Cafe. We can’t wait to bring them home. ❤

“kaze hikaru,” Shining Wind, #haiku

Happy April! This is the first day of National Poetry Month, and my poem a day writing practice.

shining wind—
pink blossoms eddy
in moonbeams

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

My kigo is “shining wind” kaze hikaru in Japanese. I’ve followed a 3-5-3 syllable format.

April Showers Bring May Flowers

“The Dryad,” #haiku

D. L. (Denise) Finn shared the image for this week’s poetry challenge:

Image credit: D. L. Finn

I wrote a few haiku (not really a series) staying true to the rules of including a kigo (season word) and the pivot.

I love the ethereal quality to this photo. There is plenty of magic to inspire any poet!

The Dryad

From the mighty oak—
winter dryad spirits rise
Artemis rouses

***

nymphs tied to tree homes
souls married, inter-wreathed as one
love blossoms in spring

***

hamadryad fae—
bonded hardwood spirits dwell
heavy snow brings death

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

The mythology of the dryad is one of my favorite subjects. Not only are the two entities bound in life, they perish together if the tree dies. Their existence is an interdependent relationship.

“Artemis is the Greek goddess of the hunt, the wilderness, wild animals, the Moon, and chastity. She also was the protector and friend to all dryad beings. For these reasons, dryads and the Greek gods punished any mortals who harmed trees without first propitiating the tree-nymphs.” (Wikipedia.com)

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

Haiku & Senryu

Many thanks to Frank for hosting this challenge. This week, Frank J. Tassone’s Haikai Challenge is a Spring Trinity Challenge:

DateKigo
2/20remaining snow (zansetsu)
2/27Snow moon (Yuki no tsuki)
3/6waters warming (mizu nurumu)

Write the haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to any of these kigo .

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by jplenio from Pixabay

Remaining Snow (zansetsu) – haiku

From remaining snow—
purple crocus burgeoning
nature awakens

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Image by Pezibear from Pixabay

Snow Moon (Yuki no tuski) haiku

The snow moon glistens
betwixt endless tree shadows
wolf stalks his dinner

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro
Image by Peter Selbach from Pixabay

waters warming (mizu nurumu) senryu

still waters warming— 
I turn, craving your caress
your snores wake the dead

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.