#Fairy #Tarot #Friday ~ June 12, 2020

Welcome to Fairy Tarot Friday. Each Friday I’ll share a card from the Fairy Tarot deck by Doreen Virtue & Radleigh Valentine, featuring an uplifting message from the fey. I’ll also include a bit of syllabic poetry inspired by the card reading.

The Major Arcana contains 22 cards that describe major events and turning points in our lives (marriage, pregnancy, relationship and career changes, and overcoming personal challenges). The Major Arcana cards also represent the different phases from childhood to old age.

Doreen Virtue numbered the Minor Arcana cards to comprise four suits representing different aspects of human life. They number the Minor Arcana cards 1 (Ace) through 10, plus the four court cards (Princess, Prince, Queen, and King). The Minor Arcana reflects the day-to-day aspects of our lives and the people in them. Court cards represent either a situation or a person during a reading.

The Minor Arcana comprises four suits. In traditional Tarot they are; wands, cups, swords, and coins. In Fairy Tarot, the four suits reflect the seasons: Spring for wands, Summer for cups, Winter for swords, and Autumn for coins. In Angel Tarot, the seasons represent the four elements: fire = spring, water = summer, air = winter, and earth = autumn. Consider these elements in relation to the Fairy Tarot, as well.

The divinatory meanings are given for upright cards only—this tarot is not intended for reversed readings.

Once you get to know the fairies, you’ll see they are strong-willed environmentalists. They get perturbed at people who mistrust animals or the earth. Never lie to a fairy. Instead, help them take care of the planet and other living beings. Do your part. Your actions will richly reward you, and the fairies will encourage you in amazing ways.

Today’s Card: Nine of Autumn

Woo HOO! It time to reward yourself for all your hard work and achievements. It appears you’ve accomplished a great deal this week. You deserve a little relaxation, nurturing, and peace. Take a deep breath and let it all out. Doesn’t that feel good?

Do you feel a sense of accomplishment or satisfaction? Did a special wish you asked the universe for finally come true?

Baske in the warmth of this emotional fulfilment. Why not? You deserve it!

You’ve worked very hard. It’s healthy to honor yourself in some small or large way as an incentive to keep you moving in a forward direction! Remember, you earned this. Reflect on how good this moment feels. How will you reward yourself?

This card shows the image of a successful fairy who is enjoying the music from her harp, while the fruits of her labor ripen around her.

Additional meanings of this card: Being happily self-employed. Creating a beautiful environment, enjoying the finer things in life. Cherishing your time alone.

Image by Jill Wellington from Pixabay

Celebrate, #Nonet

Reward yourself for a job well done
Commemorate your achievements
by doing something special
that feels luxurious
and self-loving too,
this is your time
now, go and
honor
you!

#Fairy #Tarot #Friday ~ March 27, 2020

Welcome to Fairy Tarot Friday. Each Friday I’ll share a card from the Fairy Tarot deck by Doreen Virtue & Radleigh Valentine, featuring an uplifting message from the fey. I’ll also include a bit of syllabic poetry inspired by the card reading.

The Major Arcana contains 22 cards that describe major events and turning points in our lives (marriage, pregnancy, relationship and career changes, and overcoming personal challenges). The Major Arcana cards also represent the different phases from childhood to old age.

They number the Minor Arcana cardsThe Minor Arcana comprises four suits representing different aspects of human life. They number the Minor Arcana cards 1 (Ace) through 10, plus the four court cards (Princess, Prince, Queen, and King). The Minor Arcana reflects the day-to-day aspects of our lives and the people in them. Court cards represent either a situation or a person during a reading.

The Minor Arcana comprises four suits. In traditional Tarot they are; wands, cups, swords, and coins. In Fairy Tarot, the four suits reflect the seasons: Spring for wands, Summer for cups, Winter for swords, and Autumn for coins. In Angel Tarot, the seasons represent the four elements: fire = spring, water = summer, air = winter, and earth = autumn. Consider these elements in relation to the Fairy Tarot as well.

The divinatory meanings are given for upright cards only—this tarot is not intended for reversed readings.

Once you get to know the fairies, you’ll see they are strong-willed environmentalists. They get perturbed at people who mistrust animals or the earth. Never lie to a fairy. Instead, help them take care of the planet and other living beings. Do your part. Your actions will richly reward you, and the fairies will encourage you in amazing ways.

Today’s Card

Eight of Spring

Wow… did I pick up on everyone’s mood or what? There are so many kinds of stress. This card reflect the kind that comes from having many wonderful things in your life at once!

Seriously, in the middle of stay at home notices and quarantines, please take the time to recognize your blessings! You may be juggling your family, your career and new opportunities, your fitness, maintaining your health, writing, etc. You just seem to have a lot on your plate right now. I get that.

Guess what? This is the card of successful multitasking. If things have been quiet for you, expect to see a big increase in traffic! Things will feel like they are speeding up. Make sure you complete all your tasks. If you can, delegate items on your to-do list. That will alleviate some of that stress you are feeling.

Be grateful for all the wonderful things in your life while you juggle them. You’ve got this!! Embrace your confidence and embrace any sudden events or rapid changes with a smile on your face.

The fairy in the card attempts to manage eight dandelions at one time. That’s a lot to handle… just remember, dandelions represent wishes that will come true. Are you ready?

Confidence Rising, #Shadorma

Stressful bliss—
manna from heaven
new balance,
for strange times
be grateful for your success
when wishes come true

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Stay healthy and happy, my friends.

“Home,” #Nonet

I wanted to try something different this week for my poetry challenge so I shared a photo for poets to use as inspiration for their poems. The last thing I want is for this challenge to seem dull. So, let’s give it a try!

There’s a lot going on in this photo. There’s the porch light shining brightly and a package by the door. Is anybody home?

The bikes outside hint that maybe the kids are upstairs doing homework or getting into other trouble. Parked bikes could also mean that the kids are next door. That means mom and dad might have time some time to spend alone. We know it’s summer – there’s lots of greenery present. Hmmmm…

Who lives here? What are their lives like? Do you see/feel happiness or pain? What is not being said in this photo?

Photo prompts are fun to use in poetry as a way to delve into the feelings that a photo conveys. Experiment with some of the themes you get out of the photo. I’ve used the Senryu form to share some of my themes from above:

The porch light is on
welcoming friends to enter
yet, no one is home


Muggy summer nights
alone with my beloved
reclaiming our love


The longer syllabic forms work well with photo prompts too. Here is my submission for this week, a Nonet.

“Home,” # Nonet

As the fringes of darkness descend
cicadas sing their summer songs
inviting all kith and kin 
where hearts dwell together
wrapped tightly in love
dear memories
bittersweet
send me
home

© 2019 Colleen M. Chesebro

Don’t be shy! Give the Photo Prompt a try!

“The Wild Hunt,” A Nonet Poem

This week, I’m adding another poetry format to Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge that is similar to the Etheree, except there are nine lines instead of ten. Everyone loves the Etheree, and I just couldn’t wait till the beginning of the new year to add a similar form. ❤ Many thanks to Jane Dougherty for the suggestion.

You can find the instructions on how to write the Nonet poem under the menu item: Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Challenge Guidelines. (P.S. I need to update this page)

For this week’s challenge, I used the word algid for cold, and purest for safe.

How to write a Nonet Poem:

A nonet has nine lines. The first line has nine syllables, the second line eight syllables, the third line seven syllables, etc… until line nine finishes with one syllable. It can be on any subject. 

line 1 – 9 syllables
line 2 – 8 syllables
line 3 – 7 syllables
line 4 – 6 syllables
line 5 – 5 syllables
line 6 – 4 syllables
line 7 – 3 syllables
line 8 – 2 syllables
line 9 – 1 syllables

Poetry Base shares:

Nonet 

Because of the hourglass shape of a double nonet, it can be used to represent time’s passage.

http://www.poetrybase.info/forms/001/184.shtml

The elements of the Nonet are:

  1. stanzaic, written in any number of 9 line stanzas.
  2. syllabic, 9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 syllables per line.
  3. usually unrhymed.
Image Credit: germanicmythology.com

“The Wild Hunt”

The phantom calling of the huntsmen
resounds during the algid night
gliding through the purest air
perceived in cloudy shapes
howling on the wind
a sign of war
or a sure
fatal
end?

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

The Wild Hunt is a mythological event where a ghostly group of hunters passes overhead in the night sky in wild pursuit. (Wikipedia.com)

If one sees or hears the Wild Hunt it is believed to be a portent of war, or death, or a combination of such events. 

Check out norse-mythology.org to learn more.

Winter is coming…