The Veil is Thinning…

Samhain is only two weeks away. The days are shortening and the nights becoming longer…

Fairy Witchcraft honors deities connected to the good neighbors. This includes the liminal Gods, the Lady of the Greenwood, the Lord of the Wildwood, The Hunter, and the Queen of Wind.

My faery craft authority, Morgan Daimler, explains:

“The Lady of the Greenwood and the Lord of the Wildwood rule during the light half of the year, from Beltane until Samhain, and are also honored on the full moon. The Hunter and the Queen of the Wind rule the dark half of the year, from Samhain until Beltane, and are honored on the dark moon.”

Fairy Witchcraft: Old Ways for a New Day – Morgan Daimler

October 31st begins the dark half of the year. This is when The Hunter and the Queen of the Wind begin their reign. The liminal deities live between our world and what we call “Fairy.”

I will honor their reign by acknowledging their presence in the natural world. I know many of us are feeling the veil thin.

The Faery Star

The synchronicity of the number three is everywhere, lately. The number three has always been important in my life journey. The number three signifies good fortune. Each of my children was born with a three in the date, or a number that added up to the number three. In Buddhism, we have the three jewels: Buddha, Dharma, Sangha.

The number three signifies the passage of time:

Past, Present, Future

Birth, Life, Death

Beginning, Middle, End

Three is the number of the Divine

Three is the number of Magic

So, as the days shorten and the nights lengthen until we reach Samhain, I will listen for the voices of the Hunter and the Queen of the Wind in my dreams. I’ll look for meaning in the synchronicities and search for omens. On Samhain, I’ll leave an offering to these liminal gods, pray to them, and be open to their blessings and guidance.

Learn more about the Liminal Gods HERE

“A Norse Halloween,” A #Tanka

the great pumpkin

I have been so busy that I couldn’t find time to write a poem for my own poetry challenge for the last couple of weeks. Today, I vowed to find the time and I did!

I used the word, “somber” for grave, and “reluctant” for afraid.

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A Norse Halloween

Somber winternights—
daylight wanes and the air cools.
Leaves fall from the trees
in a decadent display
of reluctant death and rot.

© 2018 Colleen M. Chesebro

*Winternights is a pagan celebration lasting from October 28th – November 2nd. The Pagan Journey.weebly.com shares:

“…The beginning of the winter season for the Northern folk.  Remembrances of the dead and one’s ancestors were made during this feast.  Winternights was a ceremony of wild abandon; much like the Carnivale season in the Mediterranean countries, and it marked the end of the summer season of commerce and travel and the beginning of the winter season of hunting.

Much divination was done during Winternights to foretell the fates of those entering the coming year.  It was said that if one sat on a barrow-mound (grave) all night long on Winternights, one would have full divinatory, shamanic (galdr and seith), and bardic (skaldr) powers . . . that is if one retained one’s sanity!

Winternights marked the beginning of the Wild Hunt, which would continue until Walpurgisnacht.  This festival corresponds roughly to the Celtic Samhain, and the modern American festival of Halloween, although the darker aspects of the festival are not as pronounced among the Norse people.  (The Norse festival of darkness was Walpurgis, a full 6 months away).”

IMG_7075F4E08CA8-1 May your winternights be filled with pleasant dreams! ❤