Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 126, “Poet’s Choice of Words”

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

It’s the first of the month. Use your creativity and have fun.

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always lovely too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site has as an extension you can install on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to write my poems. Click on the “Workshop tab.” You can cut and paste your poem in the box or do your composing right there.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A.

This will give me the opportunity to cut and paste your poems from the submission form emails into the Recap for publication on Monday.

The rules are simple

If it’s the first poetry challenge of the month, poets choose their own words. (Synonyms are not necessary). Otherwise, for the rest of the month, I will give you two words. Choose synonyms from those words for your poetry. You, the poet, now have more control over the direction of your writing. Follow the rules carefully. Don’t use the prompt words.

After you’ve published your poem on your blog, copy and paste your poem into the form below. Then, click the SUBMIT button. (WordPress limits me on the title names, so use the Key below to know what to fill in the blanks) This form generates an email to me.

Don’t forget to click SUBMIT.

By participating in this challenge, you agree to allow me to publish your poem in a 2019 PDF collection of poetry if you are selected as the Poet of the Week. This collection will be available in January 2020 as a free download from my site.

Please note: I do not retrieve your poetry from the pingbacks – only from the submission form. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap, please use the Submission Form. ❤

However, if you can’t get the submission form to work for you, email me at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com. Please list your name, Title & Type of poem, the web address of your poem, and your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Diana’s February Story: The Elephant Child

D. Wallace Peach reads a poem she created for her monthly writing challenge. It’s fabulous! Have a listen and read along!

Myths of the Mirror

Pixabay image by Marianne Sopala

I actually recorded this if you want to listen along.

The Elephant Child

by D. Wallace Peach

An elephant child, carefree and wild
Walked into the wintry woods
He followed fox tails and jackrabbit trails
Ignoring his mother’s “shoulds”

Of course, he got lost and chilled by the frost
As night began to fall
To his rump he sunk and tooted his trunk
But no one answered his call

Oh, that cold night, to the elephant fright
The clouds began to snow
He sniffled and shivered, shook and quivered
His nose he needed to blow

The blizzard swirled and snowflakes twirled
He plodded on wobbly knees
His head grew stuffy, the snow so fluffy
He blew out a honking sneeze

Losing hope, he started to mope
When in an evergreen tree
He spied a house, just right for a mouse
And he let go a…

View original post 445 more words

How Writing Prompts Can Help Your Blog

H.R.R. Gorman has compiled a fabulous list of writing challenges, poetry challenges, and photo/writing challenges for use in our writing community. What are you waiting for? GET writing! ❤

Let Me Tell You the Story of...

When you start a writing blog, there’s only a couple ways to start interacting with other writers and readers:

  1. Depend on people you already know to follow links to your blog
  2. Start using your blog to interact with other bloggers

If you’ve got #1 set because you’re a Twitter star, congrats!  That’s awesome!

giphy-1

Most of us, however, have to (or want to) deal with #2, and a great way to do that is through the use of prompts.

Why Prompts?

“Aren’t prompts just limiting my creativity?” you may say.

To you, my fine friend, I must admit that it’s possible!  Sometimes I answer a prompt and feel like the sliver of garbage I spewed out would have been better left with my other thoughts that go completely forgotten.  You may, as well, be a person who isn’t blogging for interaction and, instead, want to just have a place to send…

View original post 1,244 more words

“Creative Intentions,” #Haibun #Tanka

This week for my weekly syllabic poetry challenge, I used the word, “frigid,” for cold, and “tempest” for storm.

I wrote a Haibun/Tanka Idyll which consists of a prose paragraph, followed by a Tanka poem (5/7/5/7/7). All syllabic poetry has rules, and the Haibun is no exception.

Here are a few of the rules for writing a Haibun in English:

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus, the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.


"Creative Intentions," #Haibun/Tanka

I shivered as cold wind gusts pushed against my beating heart. A
blizzard was brewing, and I didn’t have much time to spare.
I clutched the slip of paper where weeks before I had scratched
out in longhand my new moon intentions. All of my hopes and
dreams were scrawled on that one tiny scrap of paper. Now, I had
one last task left to complete.

Beneath the rubicund glare of the Full Blood Wolf Moon, I burned
those intentions, setting free the scorched embers of my dreams to
let loose the wild storm of inspiration raging within my heart.

May the universe
favor you with abundance
fulfilling your dreams.
Let winter's frigid tempest
ignite creativity.

©2019 Colleen M. Chesebro

In the prose above, I created a scene, told in the first person. The prose is all about my hopes and dreams and of the wishes, I hope will come true.

The Tanka poem which follows speaks to the reader of the winter in our souls and how that time can be used in creative pursuits which rise out of us like flowers blooming in spring. Both pieces are similar in theme, but I tried to keep the prose and the Tanka from repeating the same thing.

I find Haibun prose to be liberating because there is no counting of syllables until you reach the accompanying syllabic poem. And, just so you know, it took me a couple hours to compose and play with the wording.

Typically, we see a Haibun accompanied with a Tanka, Haiku, or Senryu, but I see no reason why a Haibun couldn’t contain a Shadorma, Nonet, Etheree, or Cinquain. And, more than one!

When writing a Haibun speak from the heart and let your words flow. Experiment with vivid descriptions that draw the reader into your experience. Look for words that show more than tell. ❤

Have fun and write some syllabic poetry! ❤

The Yule Log – A Tanka

Happy Winter Solstice!

Welcome to my contribution for my weekly Tanka challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt words: “warm = warmth and cheer = cheery.” Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. By the way, please link your Tanka to my post found here.

My husband and I decided to initiate a new tradition this year. We are celebrating the Winter Solstice in place of Christmas!

A few months ago, my brother in law had his DNA analyzed. The results were astounding! My husband’s family scored high for a Viking heritage. We were not surprised because they are all rather tall folks. My husband is 6 ft. 7 in., his brother 6 ft. 4 in., and his sister is 6 ft. tall! Let’s just say that the weekly television show called, The Vikings took on new meaning in our household. 😀

vikings-giphy

Image credit: Giphy.com

It seemed fitting to celebrate the Winter Solstice. Christmas had lost meaning for us through the years after the kids moved away. I did some research and found a great site that explains the tradition. Click here to learn more about a Winter Solstice Tradition. I also talk about my plans for our celebration on Mindful Monday on A Mindful Journeysite.wordpress.com, my other blog.

The cheery Yule log –
flames burn to honor the sun,
spreading warmth and light.
Our token good luck ashes
protection for the next year.

©2016 Colleen M. Chesebro

However, you celebrate the season, may you find peace and joy. Hugs!

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #13 – Warm & Cheer

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months).

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 12th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – PEACE & SPIRIT: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Focus | The Poetry Channel

lost, questioning soul | rivrvlogr

No peace – Jane Dougherty Writes *This Tanka and our dialogue, prompted my Mindful Monday post on my other blog: A Mindful Journey site.

Colleens Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 Peace & Spirit | Annette Rochelle Aben

שלום (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Peace & Spirit | thoughts and entanglements

Heated | Lemon Shark Reef

Peace & Spirit – Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 – Ladyleemanila

Tanka – Peace/Spirit | Mother Willow

Offering | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The Amber-Haired Girl – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Norma’s Natterings

Magnetic Poetry Saturday: Circled by Spirit | method two madness

#AmWriting Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 – Peace & Spirit/Two on a Rant

I couldn’t choose between the two Tankas listed below for my favorite of the week. There were so many powerful poems. We all seem to be feeling the unease spreading throughout the world by channeling our feelings into our words. Please click the link at the end of each poem to visit their blogs.

No peace in the waves,

their restless, rolling spirit

sinks hope, a wrecked ship.

But I watch the grey gull soar,

plucking my dreams from the wind.

©2016 Jane Dougherty

~*~

lost, questioning soul
searching for elusive peace
with flagging spirit

discovering the answer
deep within the hearts of men

©2016 Rivrvlogr

Both of these Tanka poems moved me. Well done, friends. ❤

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: WARM & CHEER

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

#TANKA TUESDAY!

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES.

Read more on Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just click on the link to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email.

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

colleenchesebro.com Twitter Facebook Google+ Instagram

 

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 – Peace & Spirit

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months).

A spot of tea, anyone? Grab a cup of Joe and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

YOU GUYS!!

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 11th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – EYES & SHELTER: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Shacked Up | The Poetry Channel

#AMWRITING COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY PROMPT CHALLENGE #11 – EYES & SHELTER/Two on a Rant

Additional Tanka from Joelle, Two on a Rant left in comments: You did it to me again! A stream of consciousness tanka! (She likes it hot and lives in Florida, I like it cold and live in Colorado 😀 I love the play on words.
You are the ice queen,
and I am the fire queen,
we are sisters still.
Our kingdoms never to touch,
true friendship knows no degrees.

Eyes Wide Open (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Morning melt – Ontheland

Eyes & Shelter | thoughts and entanglements

Water is Life/Method Two Madness

The Dragon’s Lair: (She has been having problems with her blog and posted her tanka in the comments)

longing to go home
the eyes of the broken ones
water stony ground
finding no home or shelter
under Freedom’s skies.

The Prophecy – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge #11 Eyes & Shelter/Annette Rochelle Aben

 last daylight fading | rivrvlogr

M. Zane McClellan, from The Poetry Channel, and his Tanka called, “Shacked Up,” is our featured poet for this week.

My eyes are open
I know love is my shelter
and you are my love

I am held, but not possessed
With you is where I belong

M. Zane McClellan

Copyright © 2016
All rights reserved

~*~

What a beautiful love poem Tanka. He made ME feel the words. How about you? 😀


Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PEACE & SPIRIT

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.


#TANKA TUESDAY!

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES.

Read more on Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just click on the link to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

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Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #10 – FATE & STARS

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months)

A spot of tea, anyone? Grab a cup of Joe and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

    To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 9th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – THANKS & BEGINNINGS: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Regrettable Choice | The Poetry Channel

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge 8 Thanks & Beginnings | Annette Rochelle Aben

Thanks & Beginnings | thoughts and entanglements

old days remembered | rivrvlogr

#amwriting Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #8 – THANKS & BEGINNINGS | Two on a Rant

Seeking | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

New day – My words, My life

Thankful for beginnings | Chasing Life and Finding Dreams

To the Giver | Running with a Friend

Thanks & Beginning – My Words My Life

A Tanka – Thanks & Beginning – Norma’s Natterings

Looking Forward – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Annette Rochelle Aben is our featured poet of the week.


I loved her take on the prompt words and she had me with “gratitude unites the world.”

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: FATE & STARS

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

#TANKA TUESDAY! REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS OR THEMES FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES. ❤

 

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

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Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #8 – TIME & LAUGHTER

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months)


This election has been hard on all of us. I’m an empathic writer and just could not muster the strength to write last week. Good news… my fairy nymphs have begun whispering their tales to me once again, although, the story has changed. It’s time to forge ahead! I am going to use my NaNoWritMo time to flesh out the new book. It was never about word count for me. It was about writing daily. As we said in the Air Force – Onward and Upward! ❤

SO, NOW: LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THIS EXCITING POETRY FORM. Did these instructions help last week? Here they are again, as a reminder:

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem. It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

At Study.com, there is an excellent discussion on how to write a Tanka. This is part of a lesson you would have to pay for so I have quoted the best part of that site. I color coded the things for you to consider when writing your own Tanka:

“Tanka poems are a traditional Japanese style of poetry that follows a set pattern. In this lesson, you’ll learn the structure of the tanka, be introduced to its subject matter, and be presented with examples of this type of poetry.

Original Tanka Poetry Example

the color of the cherry blossom

has faded in vain

in the long rain

while in idle thoughts

I have spent my life.

– Ono no Komachi (circa 850) Original Japanese Tanka

You may be familiar with haiku, a traditional style of Japanese poetry containing only three lines. The poem above is a tanka, another style of Japanese poetry. Tanka poems are quite similar to haiku, and in this lesson, you’ll learn how they are structured and what you might expect to find in a tanka poem.

Tanka Structure and Content

Tanka poems, when written in Japanese, follow a pattern of syllables 5-7-5-7-7. In other words, the first and third lines contain only five syllables each, while the second, fourth, and fifth lines have seven syllables. When translated into English the syllable count is usually thrown off, which is why our example has nine syllables in the first line. There would only be five in the original Japanese version.

Additionally, each tanka is divided into two parts. The first three lines are the upper phrase, and the last two lines are the lower phrase.

The upper phrase typically contains an image, and the lower phrase presents the poet’s ideas about that image

Many traditional poetic forms have a turn, a place where the poem shifts, and for the tanka, this happens between the upper and lower phrase. In our example, the poet presents an image of faded cherry blossoms, and after the turn, she compares her own life to the wasted beauty of those blossoms.

While haiku poems are usually about nature, tanka is often personal reflections on love and other strong emotions. Tanka also uses figurative language. In the example, above, the poet creates a metaphor connecting the wilted cherry blossoms to her life.”

My example:

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye? You end up with lines of syllables totaling, 5/7/5/7/7.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to write your feelings into this poetry form.

I hope this helps to explain the “TURN,” or “PIVOT.” Remember: create an image in your mind with the first three lines, and in the last two lines give us your opinion or thoughts about that mind-picture.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use Fotoflexer, Picmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 7th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CELEBRATE & WATCH: (I hope you are visiting the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge #7 Celebrate & Watch | Annette Rochelle Aben

Celebrate & Watch | thoughts and entanglements

Squirreling | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo 

Tanka – Celebrate/Watch | Mother Willow

Watching as you Celebrate | imanikingblog

Holiday Season Unfurling | Stutter-Stepping Heart

Celebrate and Watch #Tanka | Potholes in the Road of Life

patterns in the sky | rivrvlogr

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #AMWRITING #POETRY PROMPT CHALLENGE #7 – CELEBRATE & WATCH – Two on a Rant

What an excellent job everybody did this week.

Here is our Tanka Highlight for this week from Pat at Thoughts & Entanglements

bright lively colors
creeping across the garden –
celebrate autumn
sitting by the firepit
loosely lost in reflection

Each week I will highlight a Tanka to share with all of you. ❤

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: TIME & LAUGHTER

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

Autumn of 2016

Autumn softly slips –
as time advances forward
countdown to the end,
laughter filled days of summer
suspended by winter’s woes.

~Colleen Chesebro~

Winter 2016


IT’S TIME TO GET YOUR TANKA ON!

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #7 – CELEBRATE & WATCH

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be discontinued in the next few months)


Have you been looking for me? I’m working on my second book, The Meadow Fairy. During my first week, I’ve written a total of 8,373 words! I’m a bit behind but no matter – I’m going to keep writing!

LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THIS EXCITING POETRY FORM. Did these instructions help last week? Here they are again, as a reminder:

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem. It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

At Study.com, there is an excellent discussion on how to write a Tanka. This is part of a lesson you would have to pay for so I have quoted the best part of that site. I color coded the things for you to consider when writing your own Tanka:

“Tanka poems are a traditional Japanese style of poetry that follows a set pattern. In this lesson, you’ll learn the structure of the tanka, be introduced to its subject matter, and be presented with examples of this type of poetry.

Original Tanka Poetry Example

the color of the cherry blossom

has faded in vain

in the long rain

while in idle thoughts

I have spent my life.

– Ono no Komachi (circa 850) Original Japanese Tanka

See below for more directions

You may be familiar with haiku, a traditional style of Japanese poetry containing only three lines. The poem above is a tanka, another style of Japanese poetry. Tanka poems are quite similar to haiku, and in this lesson, you’ll learn how they are structured and what you might expect to find in a tanka poem.

Tanka Structure and Content

Tanka poems, when written in Japanese, follow a pattern of syllables 5-7-5-7-7. In other words, the first and third lines contain only five syllables each, while the second, fourth, and fifth lines have seven syllables. When translated into English the syllable count is usually thrown off, which is why our example has nine syllables in the first line. There would only be five in the original Japanese version.

Additionally, each tanka is divided into two parts. The first three lines are the upper phrase, and the last two lines are the lower phrase.

The upper phrase typically contains an image, and the lower phrase presents the poet’s ideas about that image

Many traditional poetic forms have a turn, a place where the poem shifts, and for the tanka, this happens between the upper and lower phrase. In our example, the poet presents an image of faded cherry blossoms, and after the turn, she compares her own life to the wasted beauty of those blossoms.

While haiku poems are usually about nature, tanka is often personal reflections on love and other strong emotions. Tanka also uses figurative language. In the example, above, the poet creates a metaphor connecting the wilted cherry blossoms to her life.”

My example:

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye? You end up with lines of syllables totaling, 5/7/5/7/7.

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to write your feelings into this poetry form.

I hope this helps to explain the “TURN,” or “PIVOT.” Remember: create an image in your mind with the first three lines, and in the last two lines give us your opinion or thoughts about that mind-picture.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use Fotoflexer, Picmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 6th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WIND & GRACE: (I hope you are visiting the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

#Tanka Challenge Wind and Grace  | Potholes in the Road of Life

Tanka Tuesday: Wind & Grace – Image & Word

Wind & Grace | thoughts and entanglements

Colleens Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 Wind & Grace | Annette Rochelle Aben

Test of Faith – Leara writes and other creative things…

Winds of Grace | The Poetry Channel

Wind and Grace #Tanka – ladyleemanila

storm clouds approaching | rivrvlogr

Tanka – Wind/Grace | Mother Willow

Grace | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Wind of Grace | imanikingblog

#Tanka Challenge 6 @ColleenChesebro – MEANINGS AND MUSINGS

Windswept to Grace | Stutter-Stepping Heart

Test of Faith – Leara Writes & Take Pics

Tanka Wind & Grace – Neel Writes Blog

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 Wind & Grace – Two on a Rant

Waving With Grace – Naa Prapancham, My World

Last Dance – Naa Prapancham, My World

The Graceful Winds of Love – Chasing Life & Finding Dreams

She Deserted his World & Left – Life at Seventeen

JOB!

Did those instructions help you to get the pivot last week? Here is a Tanka that was spot on!

Each week I am going to share a Tanka I thought was special BECAUSE it conveyed the author’s feelings.

The above Tanka is from Greg at Potholes in the Road of Life. I love how he got his feelings into the Tanka! ❤

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CELEBRATE & WATCH

 (any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

I got creative this week and used “applaud” for the word celebrate, and I used the word, “behold,” for the word, watch. There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

A seasonal change –
behold the cold winds blowing,
fingers of frost etched
against my dark window panes
I applaud nature’s artwork.

~Colleen Chesebro~

SHARE YOUR TANKA! IT’S TIME TO GET YOUR TANKA ON! ❤

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. ❤