“Spring Rain-harusame,” #haiku, #NaPoWritMo

I didn’t write for the NaPoWritMo prompt today because our two kitties, Chloe and Sophie, finally made it home. Instead, I wrote a haiku for my poem-a-day creative endeavor.

spring rain...
the scent of petrichor
fuels primal urges

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

We awakened to a gunmetal gray, heavy-clouded sky. As the rumble of thunder grew louder, the rain pounded against the roof. Flashes of lightning slashed at the clouds with bright bursts of light.

I couldn’t tell you the last time we heard a thunderstorm—probably since we left Florida years ago. The scent of the wet earth filled me with the scent of spring. What a lovely morning!

It’s raining cats and dogs!

Chloe & Sophie

Chloe made herself right at home! She’s a six-month-old gray and white shorthair.

Sophie is more skittery. She’s a four-month-old tortoiseshell. The two are always together, never far apart. ❤

I’m thrilled with how socialized both girls are. Many thanks to the Constellation Cat Cafe, in East Lansing, Michigan.

Check out their Facebook Page

“neko no koi,” Cats in Love, #haiku, #haiga, #NaPoWritMo

First I’ll give you the haiku. The kigo is “cats in love” (neko no koi) which signifies spring.

cats in love—
howls under the moon
rite of spring

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

Let’s talk about haiga poetry. This is poetry that combines three forms: imagery, photographs or original art, and calligraphy. If you use a photo and add your haiku or senryu to it, it then becomes a haiga, subject to the rules of that form.

Haiga is written in the short-long-short syllable form or for my poetry challenge, the 5-7-5 form.

The most important part of a haiga… The image cannot complete the haiku or senryu. If you need the photo to get your message across, you’ve failed with your poem.

Remember, take the first and second lines of your haiku or senryu. Do they make sense? Then, take the second and third lines of your haiku or senryu. Do they add another layer of meaning to your poem? That is the juxtaposition you need to make your poem memorable.

Line one and two:

cats in love—howls under the moon

Line two and three:

howls under the moon, rite of spring

Each section of the haiku shares a different layer of meaning. Tell me, who hasn’t wanted to howl under the spring moon?

Now, let’s choose a photo and add our haiku:

Image by Susan Cipriano from Pixabay

The photo for this haiga gives us a glimpse of the moon along with a view of bare trees, signifying spring. You don’t need the photo, to understand the haiku. All the photo does is enhance the magic of the moon in springtime. Can you hear the cats howling?

Speaking of cats… the countdown has begun! On Monday, six-month-old Chloe, and four-month-old Sophie will become part of our family. They are a bonded pair we found at the Constellation Cat Cafe. We can’t wait to bring them home. ❤