“Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki)” #haiku

Frank Tassone’s Haikai challenge asks us to celebrate by writing the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that allude to either Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki), New Year’s Eve (toshi no yo), or New Year’s Day (ganjitsu).

Frank says:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

I started with a 2/3/2 haiku, a 3/5/3 haiku, and finished with a traditional 5/7/5 haiku all dedicated to the Cold Moon (fuyu no tsuki).

***

Photo by Frank Cone on Pexels.com

Cold moon
hopes and dreams
fulfilled

Long night’s moon
darkness and cold hides
spring below

December Full Moon
myths awaken under stars
the goddess slumbers

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I’ve also added this sequence for Tanka Tuesday, where I asked everyone to write about hope. This is my last post for 2020. I’ll see you all in the new year in a new home in Michigan!

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

The Tanka Tuesday weekly poetry challenge will return January 19, 2021. All poets welcome! ❤

“The New Age of Aquarius,” #haiku

Yay! Frank Tassone’s Haikai challenge is back! I found inspiration in the kigo: 170 – Winter Solstice II/Christmas.

Yuletide blessings flow
from dawn's light thorough Stonehenge
the sun god returns

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Pagans around the world celebrate the return of the light as the Wheel of the Year continues to turn. May the darkness of this plague-ridden year be behind us!

Happy Yule, Merry Christmas, & Happy New Year!

“Yuletide,” #cinquain

Merry Christmas! This week for my Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge, I asked everyone to contribute a cinquain so I could create a huge garland of cinquain to wrap around our “poet-tree.”

I wrote this cinquain for the Winter Solstice, but totally forgot to post it! Better late than never!

Yuletide—
the longest night
of celestial darkness
brings us the return of sunshine 
balanced

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

New Form: The Pareiku, from Auroras & Blossoms

The Auroras & Blossoms Poetry Journal has created a new poetry form called the pareiku.

The word “pareiku” combines two concepts:

  • ‘pareidolia’ – the tendency to perceive a specific, often meaningful image in a random or ambiguous visual pattern.
  • ‘-ku’ – a tribute to Japanese poetry forms like the haiku and tanka.

The rules to create this form are quite simple:

  1. Link together two seemingly unrelated images as one via a 19-syllable poem.
  2. The poem must have a title and follow the 7-5-7 syllable pattern. Punctuation is optional.
  3. The two images can feature the same or different types of visual art. But you must own copyrights / have permission from the artist(s) to use those images. And credits are required at the end of your piece.
  4. Pareiku are meant to be positive / inspirational and family-friendly. So no erotica and no swear words allowed.

Learn more about the form here: Pareiku


Image by bertvthul from Pixabay

The pathway through the darkness
replete with dangers—
often leads us to the light

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Image by Stefan Keller from Pixabay

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

#WQWWC – “Light or Lights”

Marsha Ingrao, from Always Write, has breathed new life into my old challenge, Writer’s Quotes Wednesday Writing Challenge, #WQWWC. This is your opportunity to choose a quote to match the topic of the week and write something about it.

  • Poem
  • Opinion Piece
  • Short Story
  • Personal Story
  • Memoir
  • Song
  • Photo Challenge

Flex your creative muscles and tell your readers what you think about the topic of the week using your favorite quote.

Each week I will post a different topic like freedomchance, change, happinessadventure, miracle, and unity – some of the many examples of topics from the past.

Instructions

  1. Pick a quote to match the week’s topic.
  2. Write a response on your blog with a title that suits your post.
  3. Cut and paste #WQWWC logo if you want to use it.
  4. Use #WQWWC hashtag to get more views.
  5. Paste a link to your post on my weekly post in Mr. Linky.
  6. Or past a link in my comment section. I will visit your blog and comment.
  7. Visit other blogger’s who have participated and leave them an encouraging comment.

Here’s my quote:

“There is a crack in everything.
That’s how the light gets in.” 

― Leonard Cohen, Selected Poems, 1956-1968

I always enjoy writing about the juxtaposition between the imagery of light and dark. I know our subject is light, but you can’t talk about the light without first experiencing the darkness. Just as night turns to day, darkness succumbs to the light.

Each of us hides our dark side from the world. This isolated part of our hidden self is where our soul-wounds abide, where our sadness lingers, and where our weaknesses hide. If we can learn to embody our shadows, we will learn to embrace the light. If we want to accept change, we need to acknowledge that there are sides of us we must explore in order to conquer our fears.

I think darkness came first, for the dark is perpetual. Pick up a rock and look underneath. You will find the darkness. However, you needed the light to acknowledge that darkness. The two concepts: light and dark need each other in order to exist.

Embrace your darkness and your light!

Image by Stefan Keller from Pixabay

Embrace Your Light, #Butterfly #Cinquain

sparkle
 like the bright stars
 that twinkle in darkness,
 secure, alone in the shadows 
 Only—
 when we're brave enough to explore 
 our darkness can we find 
 our own power 
 of light.

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

AUTUMN DAYDREAMS, #HAIKU

Frank’s Haikai challenge asks us to write the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that states or alludes to either Fall foliage or goose (kari)–or both, if you feel so inclined!

As always: Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

Autumn Daydreams

orange and gold leaves
memories of past autumns
the desert heat boils

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

The unrelenting heat continues here in Buckeye, Arizona. We’re hovering right around 100 F. this afternoon. If I close my eyes and ignore the dull drone of the air conditioning, I can picture the gold and orange leaves of a Montana autumn. I’m homesick for the cooler temperatures and the feel of Autumn… a girl can dream.

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

“Apocalypse Now” #Haibun

For my weekly syllables only poetry challenge this week, I’ve written this haibun using scented for the word, hint; and bright, for the the word, bold.

Image Credit: Todd Chesebro, San Francisco, CA

“Apocalypse Now” #Haibun

Is the myth of an Apocalypse a reality? Has mankind finally finished decimating our planet? The mother goddess is screaming out to anyone who will listen. Shhh… if you close your eyes and listen, you will hear her keening wail. Her voice carries on the wind.

Plagues, inland storms with the strength of hurricanes, fires that never stop burning, smoke so thick it chokes you… what will it take for us to wake up and realize climate change is real? When will we believe the truth? How much more proof do we need?

smoke scented sky haze
bright birds hide in confusion
waiting for the sun

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Image Credit: Todd Chesebro, San Francisco, CA

Frank Tassone’s Haikai Challenge #153: “Morning Glory Sunrise” #Haiku

This week, Frank Tassone asks us to write the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that alludes to either the cricket (koorogi) or the morning-glory (asagao).

As always:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by namyuha1009 from Pixabay

cricket bids farewell

at morning-glory sunrise

blossoms wet with dew

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

“Map to Love,” #KindKu

I can’t help myself. I’ve got to try this KindKu poetry form again from the Auroras & Blossoms Poetry Journal. Click the link to find the challenge #4 writing prompt.

Of course, I’ve combined it with my own Tanka Tuesday challenge where the theme this week is “maps.” Forgive me for not using one of our regular forms.

Here are the KindKu Rules:

The Kindku is a short poem of seven lines and 43 syllables. The syllable pattern is 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 or 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5.

The Kindku must include seven words that are taken from one specific source — a poem, a book, a newspaper article, etc. In the case of a book or long piece of writing, those words must come from the same page.

Words must be used in the order they were found. Their placement also depends on the line:

  • Line 1 starts with word 1
  • Line 2 ends with word 2
  • Line 3 starts with word 3
  • Line 4 ends with word 4
  • Line 5 starts with word 5
  • Line 6 ends with word 6
  • Line 7 starts or ends with word 7

Kindku poems can have titles and punctuation. No matter the topic covered, they must sport a positive tone.

Kindku poets are encouraged to credit and link to the inspirations behind their pieces. The theme is from the Rascals – People Got to be Free.

“People Got To Be Free” by The Rascals

All the world over, so easy to see
People everywhere just wanna be free
Listen, please listen, that’s the way it should be
There’s peace in the valley, people got to be free

You should see what a lovely, lovely world this’d be
Everyone learned to live together, ah hah
Seems to me such an itty bitty thing should be
Why can’t you and me learn to love one another?

All the world over, so easy to see
People everywhere just wanna be free (wanna be free)
I can’t understand it, so simple to me
People everywhere just got to be free

If there’s a man who is down and needs a helpin’ hand
All it takes is you to understand and to pull him through, ah hah
Seems to me we got to solve it individually, ah ah
And I’ll do unto you what you do to me
Said, no

Shout it from the mountain on out to the sea
No two ways about it, people have to be free (they gotta be free)
Ask me my opinion, my opinion will be
Natural situation for a man to be free
Get right on board now, huh, huh

Oh, what a feelin’s just come over me
Love can move a mountain, make a blind man see
Everybody sing it now come on let’s go see
Peace in the valley now, we all can be free

See that train over there?
Now that’s the train of freedom
It’s about to ‘rrive any minute, now
You know it’s been’a long, long overdue
Look out ’cause it’s a’comin’ right on through
Ha, ha, yeah

AZLyrics.com

Here are my seven words (from the same line) inspiration: “can’t understand it, so simple to me” I chose the  5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 form.

Here is the key:

Line 1 starts with word 1: can’t

Line 2 ends with word 2: understand

Line 3 starts with word 3: it

Line 4 ends with word 4: so

Line 5 starts with word 5: simple

Line 6 ends with word 6: to

Line 7 starts or ends with word 7: me

Image by Lorri Lang from Pixabay

Map to Love, #KindKu

can’t you trace my heart
like a map to understand
it sings of journeys
two lovers must explore, so
simple sparks embrace
the future uncharted to
me and you, for life.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

#Haikai Challenge #152 (8/16/20): katydid (kirigirisu), A #Haiku Sequence

This week, Frank J. Tassone’s Haikai Challenges asks us to write a haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that alludes to the katydid (kirigirisu).

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by Brett Hondow from Pixabay

For Frank’s Haikai challenge, I created a haiku sequence dedicated to the katydid, an insect we don’t have here in the Sonoran desert of Arizona.

summer's soothsayer
promises changes to come
grass green leaves singsong

neath the white moon orb
acacia trees sway in rhythm
katydid dinner

twilight winds scour leaves
death song harmonies unite
as summer sounds fade

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro