AUTUMN DAYDREAMS, #HAIKU

Frank’s Haikai challenge asks us to write the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that states or alludes to either Fall foliage or goose (kari)–or both, if you feel so inclined!

As always: Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by David Mark from Pixabay

Autumn Daydreams

orange and gold leaves
memories of past autumns
the desert heat boils

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

The unrelenting heat continues here in Buckeye, Arizona. We’re hovering right around 100 F. this afternoon. If I close my eyes and ignore the dull drone of the air conditioning, I can picture the gold and orange leaves of a Montana autumn. I’m homesick for the cooler temperatures and the feel of Autumn… a girl can dream.

Want to write syllabic poetry? Join me every Tuesday at Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry.

The Connection, #Haibun

This week’s Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge was an Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt provided by Lisa Thompson.

Image credit: Unsplash, and the photographer is Wolfgang Hasselmann

The Connection, #Haibun

My walk resulted in a surprise this morning. I found a toadstool growing on the north side of a Palo Verde tree where the sprinkler had sprung a leak. It’s unusual to see a toadstool in the desert, so I suspected there was magic afoot.

The late summer sun hung in the early sky, an angry red orb smothered by wildfire smoke. Cool air currents swirled around my legs, mixing with the warmer currents above. I followed the winding path along the wall that edged the sprawling desert surrounding my housing area, listening to the sounds of the birds in the trees.

Ahead, a woman and her dog, dawdled. She’d tug his leash to suggest a turn in the path, but he’d have nothing to do with any changes in his plans. He planted his feet, refusing to budge, and watched my steady approach.

I remembered this dog from another walk. He’s an older gent with only one eye; maybe a terrier mix. Like me, his hair has turned silver and gray.

When I finally caught up to him, the dog wriggled across the path, wagging a stub of a tail in greeting.

“Hello, Sir Galahad,” I called out. I didn’t know his actual name, but this name seemed to fit. I held out my hand, and he gave it a quick lick. I scratched his head, and he shivered in delight. Both of us connected for that second, bonded in the simple pleasure of connecting with another like soul.

“He waited for you,” his owner said. “He wouldn’t take the turn until he could see you.”

I nodded my head. “I noticed he waited for me.”

The lady smiled back as Sir Galahad scampered to her side. “He definitely has his favorites.”

“You know what?” I called over to her. “That little guy just made my day.”

“That’s his speciality,” she answered, with a knowing look on her face.

The two of them turned down the fork in the path, and I realized how important this connection felt to me. I turned toward home, and noticed my steps were lighter, as if someone had lifted some tremendous weight I hadn’t known I carried around my shoulders.

look for the magic
in everyday occurrences
friendship feeds your soul

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I consider the prose portion of this poem a haibun because I share a slice of my life, as in a real occurrence. The haiku speaks of change, asking you to seek the magic in life. As for the toadstool… well, I might have stretched that part a bit.

“Apocalypse Now” #Haibun

For my weekly syllables only poetry challenge this week, I’ve written this haibun using scented for the word, hint; and bright, for the the word, bold.

Image Credit: Todd Chesebro, San Francisco, CA

“Apocalypse Now” #Haibun

Is the myth of an Apocalypse a reality? Has mankind finally finished decimating our planet? The mother goddess is screaming out to anyone who will listen. Shhh… if you close your eyes and listen, you will hear her keening wail. Her voice carries on the wind.

Plagues, inland storms with the strength of hurricanes, fires that never stop burning, smoke so thick it chokes you… what will it take for us to wake up and realize climate change is real? When will we believe the truth? How much more proof do we need?

smoke scented sky haze
bright birds hide in confusion
waiting for the sun

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Image Credit: Todd Chesebro, San Francisco, CA

Frank Tassone’s Haikai Challenge #153: “Morning Glory Sunrise” #Haiku

This week, Frank Tassone asks us to write the haikai poem of our choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that alludes to either the cricket (koorogi) or the morning-glory (asagao).

As always:

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by namyuha1009 from Pixabay

cricket bids farewell

at morning-glory sunrise

blossoms wet with dew

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

“Map to Love,” #KindKu

I can’t help myself. I’ve got to try this KindKu poetry form again from the Auroras & Blossoms Poetry Journal. Click the link to find the challenge #4 writing prompt.

Of course, I’ve combined it with my own Tanka Tuesday challenge where the theme this week is “maps.” Forgive me for not using one of our regular forms.

Here are the KindKu Rules:

The Kindku is a short poem of seven lines and 43 syllables. The syllable pattern is 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 or 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5.

The Kindku must include seven words that are taken from one specific source — a poem, a book, a newspaper article, etc. In the case of a book or long piece of writing, those words must come from the same page.

Words must be used in the order they were found. Their placement also depends on the line:

  • Line 1 starts with word 1
  • Line 2 ends with word 2
  • Line 3 starts with word 3
  • Line 4 ends with word 4
  • Line 5 starts with word 5
  • Line 6 ends with word 6
  • Line 7 starts or ends with word 7

Kindku poems can have titles and punctuation. No matter the topic covered, they must sport a positive tone.

Kindku poets are encouraged to credit and link to the inspirations behind their pieces. The theme is from the Rascals – People Got to be Free.

“People Got To Be Free” by The Rascals

All the world over, so easy to see
People everywhere just wanna be free
Listen, please listen, that’s the way it should be
There’s peace in the valley, people got to be free

You should see what a lovely, lovely world this’d be
Everyone learned to live together, ah hah
Seems to me such an itty bitty thing should be
Why can’t you and me learn to love one another?

All the world over, so easy to see
People everywhere just wanna be free (wanna be free)
I can’t understand it, so simple to me
People everywhere just got to be free

If there’s a man who is down and needs a helpin’ hand
All it takes is you to understand and to pull him through, ah hah
Seems to me we got to solve it individually, ah ah
And I’ll do unto you what you do to me
Said, no

Shout it from the mountain on out to the sea
No two ways about it, people have to be free (they gotta be free)
Ask me my opinion, my opinion will be
Natural situation for a man to be free
Get right on board now, huh, huh

Oh, what a feelin’s just come over me
Love can move a mountain, make a blind man see
Everybody sing it now come on let’s go see
Peace in the valley now, we all can be free

See that train over there?
Now that’s the train of freedom
It’s about to ‘rrive any minute, now
You know it’s been’a long, long overdue
Look out ’cause it’s a’comin’ right on through
Ha, ha, yeah

AZLyrics.com

Here are my seven words (from the same line) inspiration: “can’t understand it, so simple to me” I chose the  5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 form.

Here is the key:

Line 1 starts with word 1: can’t

Line 2 ends with word 2: understand

Line 3 starts with word 3: it

Line 4 ends with word 4: so

Line 5 starts with word 5: simple

Line 6 ends with word 6: to

Line 7 starts or ends with word 7: me

Image by Lorri Lang from Pixabay

Map to Love, #KindKu

can’t you trace my heart
like a map to understand
it sings of journeys
two lovers must explore, so
simple sparks embrace
the future uncharted to
me and you, for life.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

#Haikai Challenge #152 (8/16/20): katydid (kirigirisu), A #Haiku Sequence

This week, Frank J. Tassone’s Haikai Challenges asks us to write a haikai poem of your choice (haiku, senryu, haibun, tanka, haiga, renga, etc.) that alludes to the katydid (kirigirisu).

Here’s how the challenge works:

1. write the haikai poem of your choice.
2. post the link of your post to Mister Linky.
3. pingback by posting the link to the challenge on your site.
4. read and comment on other contributors’ posts.

Image by Brett Hondow from Pixabay

For Frank’s Haikai challenge, I created a haiku sequence dedicated to the katydid, an insect we don’t have here in the Sonoran desert of Arizona.

summer's soothsayer
promises changes to come
grass green leaves singsong

neath the white moon orb
acacia trees sway in rhythm
katydid dinner

twilight winds scour leaves
death song harmonies unite
as summer sounds fade

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Blog Update 8/6/2020: “Cantaloupe” #haiku

As my Sister of the Fey, Debby Gies said to me, “Oy Vey, what a week it’s been! I apologize for all the blog craziness. WordPress is working through the issues and my posts have migrated over from the business plan. I’m still missing my Pages and featured images. Anyway, we’ll muddle through and I’ll keep cleaning up my blog. It was time to update some things, anyway.

In the meantime, here is a haiku for the Poet’s Choice Challenge with a kigo which means “season word” in Japanese. Kigo are used to define the time of the year, and they are valuable in providing economy of expression. Since haiku are mostly nature related, the use of a kigo sets the theme for your poem.

leaves kissed by the sun
lazy, hazy summertime
sweet melons ripen

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

In Phoenix, and my part of the desert in northern Buckeye, we’ve had gruesome heat. For over 32 days in a row we’ve recorded temperatures at 110 degrees F. or higher, breaking most of the old records. My garden has suffered and I’ve lost several plants even though they’re connected to the drip system in my back garden. I’ll wait until this fall to replace them.

On a whim, I threw out some cantaloupe seeds a few months back. Surprise! They sprouted and grew. I hope we get a few nice melons out of the batch.

Enjoy the rest of the rest of your week. The cover reveal for my new book, Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry is almost ready! Stay tuned.

“All Forgiven in a Day,” #kindku “Dawn”

I’ve wanted to try this new poetry challenge offered by Auroras & Blossoms poetry journal in the post below. It’s the “Dawn,” Prompt, created by Cendrine & David.

Here is the link to the words in the song: https://genius.com/Leigh-nash-nervous-in-the-light-of-dawn-lyrics which serve as the inspiration for the poetry you write.

First… What Is a Kindku?

Auroras & Blossoms says:

The Kindku is an invitation to promote kindness, positivity and inspiration through poetry. As the last two letters of the name indicate, it is based on Japanese poetry forms like the haiku and tanka.”

The Rules

The Kindku is a short poem of seven lines and 43 syllables. The syllable pattern is 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 or 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5.

The Kindku must include seven words that are taken from one specific source — a poem, a book, a newspaper article, etc. In the case of a book or long piece of writing, those words must come from the same page.

Words must be used in the order they were found. Their placement also depends on the line:

  • Line 1 starts with word 1
  • Line 2 ends with word 2
  • Line 3 starts with word 3
  • Line 4 ends with word 4
  • Line 5 starts with word 5
  • Line 6 ends with word 6
  • Line 7 starts or ends with word 7

Kindku poems can have titles and punctuation. No matter the topic covered, they must sport a positive tone.

Kindku poets are encouraged to credit and link to the inspirations behind their pieces.

First, I listened to the song and then picked the seven words: “…storm grey clouds hovering above silence all…” (Nervous in the Light of Dawn lyrics)

Next I created a chart using the 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 / 5 / 7 syllable count:

  • First line: 7 syllables: start with “storm”
  • Second line: 5 syllables: end with “grey”
  • Third line: 7 syllables: start with “clouds”
  • Fourth line: 5 syllables: end with “hovering”
  • Fifth line: 7 syllables: start with “above”
  • Sixth line: 5 syllables: end with “silence”
  • Seventh line: 7 syllables: start with “all”

I use the syllable counter at How Many Syllables.com to compose my KindKu.

Image by Albrecht Fietz from Pixabay

“All Forgiven in a Day,” #kindku

storm erupts with feral song
dawn shifts into grey
clouds swell like waves in the sea
pale brume hovering
above the fray, the rainbow—
redeems the silence
all forgiven in a day

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

What do you think? By participating in the challenge, they could select your poem to appear in the Aurora & Blossoms Journal. Click HERE for the prompt post.

This was a fun challenge! It really got my creative juices flowing. Try it!

“Freyja,” #Shadorma #poetry

Anita Dawes provided this week’s #SynonymsOnly poetry challenge words: blessed & hex. These are excellent opposites to work with in a longer poem featuring one or more stanzas. Unfortunately, my time was limited this week by all kinds of minor niggling issues. Yet, I still worked through the problems!

I’m happy to announce that I completed the first draft of Word Craft ~ Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry! Now it’s on to my editors.

This has been such a fulfilling experience to write about something I love so much. I believe this book will be a brilliant start for those who would love to write syllabic poetry, but feel intimidated by the rules and the counting of syllables. Most of all, I want people who don’t think they can write poetry to try the forms we work with in our challenges. Writing poetry makes us better writers!

Life with a kitten has been brilliant fun for Ron and I. My little furry beast is purring sweetly one minute and hanging from the curtains the next. Freyja is in the toddler stage now, pushing her luck and seeing how far she can get. She has her first vet appointment on Friday, which should have her mad at me for a few hours!

I immediately thought of her when I read the prompt words! I’ll be using the word fortunate, for blessed; and hocus-pocus for the word hex.

“Freyja,” #Shadorma

golden eyed
ebony beauty,
fortunate
enchantressbeware the powers of a
hocus-pocus cat!

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

I composed this shadorma poem with the help of a little black cat magic!

Be Careful What You Wish For… #Double Nonet

I haven’t taken part in my own poetry challenge for a couple of weeks. I’m getting down to the nitty gritty on Word Craft ~ the Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry and I’m still hunting for a few poetry forms. So, this double nonet will serve as an example to that specific form. I might add… the only example.

Finding poetry examples for the book from your blogs opened my eyes. We all have our favorite forms that we like to write. No surprise there. Some of you have a tendency to only write one form of poetry, that’s it!

I was surprised to learn that many of you had not experimented with the other syllabic poetry forms from the challenge. I hope after last week’s successes with the haibun form that some of you will venture out and try a few more. Who knows? It might inspire you to compile a collection of your poetry into a book!

The Double Nonet

A classic nonet is a nine-line poem, with a syllable count of 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. You can create this form with any number of nine-line stanzas following the original or leave it as a single verse. In my example below, I wrote two separate nine-line stanzas featuring a syllable count of 9/8/7/6/5/4/3/2/1, 9/8/7/6/5/4/3/2/1. However, you could create a double (reversed) nonet with a syllable count of 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9, 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9 syllables per line.

All Double nonet poetry needs a theme to make it cohesive. I like to leave a blank line between the stanzas, but you don’t have to. Write about the things important to you and don’t forget to use vivid descriptions.

In my piece below, in the first stanza, I write about climate change and how I imagine a scenario where the mother goddess (Gaia, or mother earth) brings rain to stop the fires ravaging the earth. While in the second stanza, I explain the consequences of too much rain.

The idea is to compare and contrast two things. There should be some kind of connection between the nonet stanzas.

You can create double haiku, double senryu, double tanka, double gogyohka, double cinquain, double etheree, and double nonet poetry. In fact, any of these forms can become longer poems by adding more stanzas, which is excellent information to know when the poetry contest you want to enter asks for longer poetry. You’ve got this!

Image by My pictures are CC0. When doing composings: from Pixabay

“Be Careful What you Wish for…”

Wind, the calming breath of the goddess
brought moisture to the thirsty earth.
Water, the life source endured
quenched the fires and flames
that stoked climate change
across our lands.
This rebirth
brings us
life.

Storm remnants ebb into silvered mists
where sky and water join as one.
I struggle for air above
the rising ocean tides,
as shrill sea bird screams
welcome me to
a fresh day
without
land.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Thanks for reading.