Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 140 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Here are your two words for this week:

Light & Dark

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! 

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the poetry from the Poet of the Month and any Honorable Mentions.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

Follow the schedule listed below:

Please do a LINK-BACK to this challenge by copying the https:// address of this post into your own.

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mention(s), No. 139, #PoetsChoiceofWords

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the Poet of the Week and the honorable mention poetry that really caught my eye from last week’s challenge. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! You’ve given me some hard choices this week. I was stunned by all the beautiful poetry. I really struggled with picking a favorite. It just goes to show how accomplished your poetry has become. ❤

Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello!

The Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

The Poet of the Week

This week, I’ve chosen Pat R, from her blog, Thoughts & Entanglements, as the Poet of the Week for her Haiku poem featured below.

I love Haiku and Senryu for the brevity of words. You have to pick the right combination of words, not only for the syllable count, but also to enhance your meaning. When you find a word that does double duty and creates something unexpected, as in the word “crying,” you’ve hit pay dirt. This Haiku, in my opinion, holds a powerful meaning!

Undoing

glacier ice tumbles
in a major undoing –
onlookers cheer, gulls cry

© 2019 Pat R

An Honorable Mention goes to Sally Cronin for her double Etheree, “A Dog’s Life.” The Etheree form is used when the poet tries to create a memorable message through the required line and syllable count. Seriously, anyone who has ever owned a pet can relate to her words.

Not sure how to write an Etheree? Check it out HERE.

Sally’s dog, Sam

A Dog’s Life

Years
so brief,
but so full
of love and joy,
with fun to be had
when a dog chooses you.
Holding them close to your heart,
inhaling that sweet puppy smell,
an ancient bond is reignited,
drawing you deep into their magic world.
They take no heed of the passing of time,
nor do they see into the future.
There are crucial priorities
that have to be considered.
Walks, sleep, play and their food.
But, above all else,
they worship you
as leader
of their
pack.

©2019 Sally G. Cronin

My final Honorable Mention for this week, goes to Kerfe Roig and her Haibun/Tanka called, “Draw a Bird Day: Grackle.” Kerfe creates her own artwork too!

I really enjoyed her Haibun because I felt like I was walking along the beach with her. The Tanka compliments her prose but doesn’t repeat or explain what the prose already said. Instead, the reader is treated to another facet of her experience.

“Grackle,” by Kerfe Roig

Draw a Bird Day: Grackle

Every beach vacation comes with its own bird. One year it was mockingbirds, one year a very vocal cardinal.  One year, crows.

This year we were accompanied by grackles. They would sit on the railing of the beach house speaking in their rusty tongue, lined up like soldiers. If one turned, all turned.  Once they saw someone was paying attention they would vocalize a bit more and suddenly disappear.

On the beach they appeared ahead of my walking path and waited for me, foraging in the waves. As soon as I caught up, they flew off ahead again.

Although it’s natural to see their iridescent strutting as a variation on crows, grackles are actually part of the lark family, related also to blackbirds and orioles.

But they do have a connection to crows—all back birds are said to know magic, to live on the borders of the possible unknown.

standing on the edge
between water and shoreline,
feathers glittering,
you pause, watch me watching you–
our eyes meet through layered light

©2019 Kerfe Roig

See you tomorrow for the new challenge! ❤

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 139 #Poet’sChoice

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

HAPPY AUGUST! (Where did the time go?)

It’s the first challenge of the month ~ Poet’s Choice of Words!

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the poetry from the Poet of the Month and any Honorable Mentions.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ, U. S. A. so I have time to compile a post and choose the Poet of the Week

The rules are simple…

Follow the schedule listed below:

Please do a LINK-BACK to this challenge by copying the https:// address of this post into your own.

You DO NOT have to send an Email. Participants and readers will find your poetry from the links in the comments section of this post. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poet of the Week & Honorable Mentions, No. 138, #SynonymsOnly

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

Congratulations, and many thanks to all the participants! Please visit the challenge post comments HERE, where you’ll find the links to everyone’s poetry. Stop by and say hello! ❤

The Poet of the Week and Honorable Mention Poets will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

This week, I’ve chosen Ritu Bhathal as the Poet of the Week for her Tanka poem featured below. The first time I read this poem, I immediately noticed the last line. What a surprise! Ritu mirrors the dark and light found in all of us with. I like the play on words because it was so unexpected. This Tanka can also be read forward and backward – intensifying the meaning of her words.

Not sure how to write a Tanka poem? Find out more HERE and in this article on the Pen & the Pad.

Clear & Nature, #Tanka

Relax, Read, Book, Rest, Enjoy
Pixabay Image
It isn't simple
Judging someone's character
On a first meeting
Never judge a book, they say
By cover, more lies within

Kerfe Roig’s Haibun/Tanka is a real stunner. The prose part of this Haibun transports the reader on a magical trip. Kerfe employs her artwork in every poem she writes. The image grid below compliments her prose and the Tanka.

Remember, when writing a Haibun, the poetry should never repeat, quote, or explain the prose. The Tanka should reflect a different aspect of the prose by sharing another narrative as a microburst of detail.

I also love her creative word play. Check out: “rainbowed,” which relates to her word imagery and the grid she constructed.

AUGUST (2019), #Haibun #Tanka

autumn 2019 grid s
Kerfe Roig

Is it the sky I seize when my hand reaches out to touch the storm of rain? Or do the heavens remain behind the veil, rainbowed and unclouded, waiting for the thunderings of the gods to echo into quietude as they follow the flashes of light to the edge of the horizon?

Everything around me is covered with drops of liquid light.

Gaia, drunk with the season’s retreat, builds an improvised framework out of the movements of the moon.

I look for the line
between now and again, where
flower becomes seed–
All is stillness, dense, restless–
leaves shiver, rattled by wind.

See you for tomorrow’s challenge!

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 138 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

Shaking & Baking in the desert!

Here are your two words for this week:

“Clear & Nature”

Join in this week’s Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge using Synonyms Only for the words: Clear & Nature. #Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #Haibun, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the poetry from the Poet of the Month and any Honorable Mentions.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

Follow the schedule listed below:

Please do a LINK-BACK to this challenge by copying the https:// address of this post into your own.

Since I’m not adding your poetry to the weekly recap any longer, you DO NOT have to send an Email. Participants and readers will find your poetry from the links in the comments section of this post.

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!

Whispering…

Sue’s poem earned the right to claim the distinction of being the Poet of the Week for last week’s challenge. Congratulations, Sue. ❤

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

*

Consciousness wavers

Ancient kindred whispering

Silent secrets shared

To know with other senses

Understanding of the heart

*

For Colleen’s poetry challenge

View original post

Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 137 #SynonymsOnly

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

POETRY NEWS: Poetry Contests & Journal Submissions

Currently, UHTS is accepting poetry for the Autumn Issue of the Cattails Journal. Submissions for Autumn/ October issue open 1st July (midnight) GMT and close 15th August (midnight) GMT. 
Read the submission requirements: HERE. You can view the journal HERE. READ the UHTS poetry definitions that are acceptable for submission HERE.

UHTS also is sponsoring the “Fleeting Words” Tanka Competition. Submission Period and Deadline: May 1-August 15 of each year. There is a 10 poem limit on the number of submissions. If more than 10 poems are submitted, only the first 10 poems will be entered. Entries must be the original work of the author, be previously unpublished and not under consideration elsewhere for the entire time period it takes to complete the judging. Click HERE for submission requirements and read carefully to find the current competition.


Here are your two words for this week:

Kind & Shift

HERE’S THE CATCH: You can’t use the prompt words! SYNONYMS ONLY! Except for the first challenge of the month ~ then, the poets get to choose their own words. ❤

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from the submission form emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

Follow the schedule listed below:

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the ping-backs any longer – only from the emails. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please email me. Please don’t just send a link to your post.

EMAIL ME:

tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com

Please send: Your name, Title & Type of poem, The web address of your poem, and Your poem. 

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


Colleen’s 2019 #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge Recap No. 136, #PhotoPrompt

Welcome to the Tanka Tuesday Poetry Recap featuring the work of poets from around the globe. If you would like to participate in this challenge, you can learn the rules in the menu item called Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Tuesday Guidelines.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is life-is-likea-cup-of-tea.-2.png

POETRY NEWS: POETRY CONTESTS & JOURNAL SUBMISSIONS

Currently, UHTS is accepting poetry for the Autumn Issue of the Cattails Journal. Submissions for Autumn/ October issue open 1st July (midnight) GMT and close 15th August (midnight) GMT. 
Read the submission requirements: HERE. You can view the journal HERE. READ the UHTS poetry definitions that are acceptable for submission HERE.

UHTS also is sponsoring the “Fleeting Words” Tanka Competition. Submission Period and Deadline: May 1-August 15 of each year. There is a 10 poem limit on the number of submissions. If more than 10 poems are submitted, only the first 10 poems will be entered. Entries must be the original work of the author, be previously unpublished and not under consideration elsewhere for the entire time period it takes to complete the judging. Click HERE for submission requirements and read carefully to find the current competition.


DON’T FORGET TO EMAIL ME YOUR POEM. And, to those of you who did email their poems, thank you for using the new email tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com.

Remember, please send me your name, title of your poem, #type of poem, and the link to your blog post where the poem was published.

Please don’t just send me your link. When you do that, I have to go to your blog, copy your poem and information, cut and paste that with no formatting into a Word document and then, cut and paste the poem into my new post. The recap takes me about 3 hours to compile into a post. I need your help in order for me to continue publishing a RECAP featuring your poem with a link back to your blog. Starting July 23rd, I WILL NOT grab your poems from the link-backs. Sorry, it’s just too much work. ❤


This week, we tried something new! A photo prompt or Ekphrasis prompt. (Many thanks to Merril D. Smith, for the additional information on the official name of this type of prompt). The Poetry foundation shares:

“Description” in Greek. An ekphrastic poem is a vivid description of a scene or, more commonly, a work of art. Through the imaginative act of narrating and reflecting on the “action” of a painting or sculpture, the poet may amplify and expand its meaning. 

Poetryfoundation.org

DON’T FORGET: The Poet of the Week & the honorable mentions will be published in the 2019 Poet of the Week Anthology, which everyone will be able to grab as a FREE PDF in January 2020.

Each week, I like to highlight a poet who I call the Poet of the Week, who has shared an exceptional message, or shown impassioned creativity through words or form. Poetry is all about perception, so don’t be shocked if you don’t feel the same way about a poem that I do.

This week, I’ve chosen H. R. R. Gorman as the Poet of the Week. His poem, The Woman at 106, was gritty and raw in its intensity. After you read it once… read it again. The undercurrent of his words blew me away. In true form, he took on the persona of the woman who lived in that house, and I loved how he read between the lines. I think he saw things, the rest of us didn’t. Here’s what he shared:

I don’t really know where this came from, but I just looked at that peaceful little house-front and tried to imagine who lived there. The bicycle drew my attention. With “women’s bikes’ relatively rare out there, I tried to cultivate this image of a person trying really hard to seem feminine. As a North Carolinian, I’ve had close exposure to extremely transphobic laws and situations, and I guess that inspired this poem.

H. R. R. Gorman

I gave one Honorable Mention to Sally Cronin, and her heartfelt poem, Those We Left Behind, because of the great emotions she evoked with her words. Once again, she looked beyond the layers in this photo to show us what was buried beneath this almost too perfect exterior.

I also gave Willow Willers an Honorable Mention for her poem, The Package. Willow tells a delightful story in a double Etheree. Even though Etheree poetry is usually unrhymed, I liked the rhythm her words created. As I’ve stressed before, sometimes you’ve gotta break the rules just a little bit!

Congratulations Poets!

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR our 1st Ekphrasic POETRY CHALLENGE using the image below:

When you look beyond the obvious you see the possibilities and can answer, ‘what if?’

ORDER: title, type of poem, followed with the name of the poet, and the link back to their post, and the poem.


“This Place, Home,” #Etheree, by Merril D. Smith

Train

slows down

time has stopped

rather, reversed–

a more pleasant time–

or perhaps it’s a dream.

She wants to stay here. This place

where flowers bloom, and it is spring

always. She gets off at the stop, now to

live another life, or one meant to be.

***

“Sweet Memories” #Haibun by Miriam Hurdle

For sentimental reason, I still keep many pieces of projects my daughter made. I have a flowerpot she decorated when she was in 5th grade. It is sitting on a round glass top table between two chairs in the front patio. I like to sit in the front porch to drink coffee in the morning. The flowerpot reminds me of the things we did together when she was growing up.

Kids are grown and gone

Keeping the bikes where they were

Jolly wheels still turned

Muddy feet through door they came

Hungry mouths screamed for cookies

***

“Home, Sweet, Home,” #Haiku, by Traci Kenworth

Green vines climb

Bicycle sits idle

A light warms.

***

“Nature Wins,” #Haiku, by Donna Matthews

ivy creeping up
vines crawling up and over 
nature wins again

***

“The Beacon,” #Haibun #Haiku by theindishe

The stony steps lined by a verdant gossamer of thin moss led to the teak paneled door of the house. Embedded in the pristine granite frame, it stood guard, a sentinel to love and life inside. The trellis lush with green foliage embellished its facade. Radiating a vernal bloom that was incited by the spark of tranquil serene from the insides of the house. The mystical French Windows, elan and regal, threw open a vista of untold love. And the bicycles stood by the trimmed hedge awaiting to be ridden onto unchartered territories. The lamp cast a bright light on a dark day.

A light of hope bright,
A beacon to show me way,
I stumble to rise.

***

“106,” #Etheree, by Anita Dawes

106

Looks out

At the world

With lights shining

As if it belongs

Chairs hidden forgotten

Bicycles never ridden

Parcel placed outside just for show

Looking for all the world to belong

Hologram, a picture from the future…

***

Poet of the Week: H. R. R. Gorman, July 16 – Jul 21, 2019

“The Woman at 106,” #Etheree/DoubleEtheree, by H. R. R. Gorman

She
Lives at
One-oh-six,
Rides a ten-speed,
Listens to a mix
Of classic rock and soul.
Once you get past the bricks
Guarding her house and her ego,
You’ll see to whom my heart is transfixed
But God says I must admire from afar.

She
Joined no
Stupid cliques
Back in high school
Where girls had no dicks.
I’d swim the river Styx
And challenge Pluto for her,
But I can’t cross the crucifix
As He stares me down and tattle-tells
To my boss, to my mom, to politics.

***

“Blue Twilight,” #Etheree, by Linda Lee Lyberg

Blue 
twilight 
drifting in 
on evening breeze 
welcoming day’s end 
lush scent of greenery 
surrounds the welcoming porch 
a place to pause, a chair to rest 
gather the day’s worries, toss them to 
the wind, sip a glass of red wine and dream.

***

“Those We Leave Behind,” by Sally Cronin

“Those We Leave Behind, #Haibun #Haiku, by Sally Cronin

I wait in the shadows of the trees opposite the house. I glimpse movement as the family moves back and forth across the windows. A house of character, substantial and clearly a happy home. Tears run down my face and gather in grief below my chin. I do not have the will to wipe them away. They remind me of another time when I was part of the laughter and happiness. Those that I have left behind have moved on. Do they even remember me? A face appears at the window and stares across the street. A small child with a face that owes much to me, her grandmother. She waves and smiles. Content I fade back into the woods and on to my final destination.

Death is not the end
when we gift a part of us
to those left behind.

***

“Home, Sweet, Home,” #Tanka, by Ritu Bhathal

This is home sweet home
Where the light on the doorstep
Shines a bright welcome
A place filled with memories
A house full of family

***

“Decadent,” #Tanka by Bobby Fairfield

Sounds of jollity

carried on electric light,

pierce ivy shutters,

through twice glazed frames declaring

Neo-Georgian mockery.

***

“Memories,” #Shadorma, by Pratibha

Memories –
Some faded on corners
Others bright;
A green house
Ringing with love and laughter 
With me; or without ? 

***

“The Package” by Willow Willers

“The Package,” Double #Etheree, by Willow Willers

Six
O’clock
Amazon
Has been to call
And left the parcel
Outside against the wall.
Jen arrives and parks her bike
This house is still not quite a home
For he is away and she’s alone.
Then she sees the package outside the door.
Full of excitement she gathers it up.
She rushed in doors to open it
It’s a beautiful photo book
Delighted she takes a look
There he is full of smiles
Waving to her from
Across the miles
Suddenly
They are
One

***

“Putting Down Roots,” #Shadorma by Jane Dougherty

Putting down

roots, clothing bare dreams

with ivy,

is painting

futures with the golden hues

of shared warmth.

***

“Photo Prompt,” #Tanka by M. J. Mallon

Who’s blue bike is that?

Oh wait, I see your shadow

Two bikes and two chairs

Two fruit scones, butter and jam

Two old friends sit by the light

***

“Breaking Free,” #Tanka, by Robbie Cheadle

Is it possible

To escape conformity

And break your shackles?

Try riding a bicycle

With your face into the wind

***

“Home is Where We Love,” #Tanka, by Vashti Quiroz-Vega

Beyond the black door

there are rooms and furniture

tastefully arranged

A home built with love and dreams

The sweetest sort of heaven

***

“Home,” #Nonet, by Colleen M. Chesebro

As the fringes of darkness descend
cicadas sing their summer songs
inviting all kith and kin 
where hearts dwell together
wrapped tightly in love
dear memories
bittersweet
send me
home

***

Are you looking for more writing/poetry/photography challenges?

H.R.R. Gorman has created a comprehensive list on his blog. Click HERE to learn more. ❤

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Colleen’s 2019 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 136 #PhotoPrompt

WELCOME TO TANKA TUESDAY!

Hi! I’m glad to see you here. Are you ready to write some syllabic poetry?

POETRY NEWS: Poetry Contests & Journal Submissions

Currently, UHTS is accepting poetry for the Autumn Issue of the Cattails Journal. Submissions for Autumn/ October issue open 1st July (midnight) GMT and close 15th August (midnight) GMT. 
Read the submission requirements: HERE. You can view the journal HERE. READ the UHTS poetry definitions that are acceptable for submission HERE.

UHTS also is sponsoring the “Fleeting Words” Tanka Competition. Submission Period and Deadline: May 1-August 15 of each year. There is a 10 poem limit on the number of submissions. If more than 10 poems are submitted, only the first 10 poems will be entered. Entries must be the original work of the author, be previously unpublished and not under consideration elsewhere for the entire time period it takes to complete the judging. Click HERE for submission requirements and read carefully to find the current competition.

GET BUSY AND WRITE SOME POETRY!

For the middle of the month challenge let’s try something new – a photo prompt!

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Use the above photo as the inspiration for your poem. Ask yourself questions and tell a story. Be creative! What does this photo say to you?

PLEASE support the other poets by visiting their blogs and leaving comments. Sharing each other’s work on social media is always nice too.

This challenge is for Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Haibun, Etheree, Nonet, Shadorma, and Cinquain poetry forms. Freestyle rhyming poetry is not part of this challenge. Thank you. ❤

For Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge, you can write your poem in one of the forms defined below. Click on the links to learn about each form:

HAIKU IN ENGLISH 

SENRYU IN ENGLISH

HAIGA

TANKA IN ENGLISH 

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH 

CINQUAIN & the variations on Cinquain-Wikipedia 

ETHEREE

NONET

SHADORMA

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables

synonyms.com 

This site even has a link so you can install the extension on Google Chrome.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site to compose my poems. Click on the “Workshop” tab, then cut and paste your poetry into the box. Click the Count Syllables button on the button. This site does the hard work for you.

I don't get it

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Phoenix, AZ).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world. The RECAP is published on Monday and will contain the challenge participant’s poems.

You have one week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Sunday, at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Phoenix, AZ time zone, U. S. A.

This will give me a chance to cut and paste the poems from your emails into the Recap published on Monday.

The rules are simple

This week, we will write our poetry using a photo prompt.

Please note: I will not retrieve your poetry from the ping-backs any longer – only from the emails. If you want to be considered for the Poet of the Week or published on the Recap please email me. Please don’t just send a link to your post.

EMAIL me:

tankatuesdaypoetry@gmail.com

Please send: Your name, Title & Type of poem, The web address of your poem, and Your poem. ❤

Don't forget

As time allows, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY. I have also been sharing some of your poetry on MeWe.com.

Click here to follow me on MeWe.

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE on your blog (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Senryu, #Haiga, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose, #CinquainPoetry, #Etheree, #Nonet, #Shadorma #PhotoPromptPoetry

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post. It’s not mandatory:

Sign up for my weekly blog recap newsletter. As a special thanks after subscribing, you can grab your FREE copy of my Poetry Forms Cheatsheet, which is perfect for use on the weekly poetry challenge. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

Have fun and write some poetry!


“Fake News,” #Tanka

This week, I shared my ideas about writing political poetry. You can read that article HERE. Political poetry is difficult to write. You don’t want to preach, but you also want to get your feelings across to others. How do you do that?

To start, you can choose a topic that brings you the most outrage. From there, describe how that topic affects you – what you believe in, and how that makes you feel.

For my weekly poetry challenge, I chose to write about fake news using the Tanka form. I like the Tanka because you can assemble your thoughts into short bursts, which I think resemble fake news phrases. At least, that was my intent.

Those two little words (fake news) do more damage to our freedoms than any other. If we can’t believe what we hear from our elected officials, where does that leave us?

For the word, ugly, I used, foul, and for the word, pretty, I chose the word fair. Fair-weather adds another dimension to the poem. Look up the word HERE.

“Fake News,” A #Tanka

Fair-weather thoughts drift
ebbing and flowing like dreams
blinded to the truth
sailing through a narrow mind
grim dogma – a foul weapon

© 2019 Colleen M. Chesebro