A New Day Dawns – A #Tanka

Focus on the image below and breathe… Use your five senses and experience a new day.

Deep in the forest
pine needle musk scents the air
near a babbling brook.
Rising dawn yellows the sky
announcing a brand new day.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Forest = earth, and brook = water: Part of my poetry challenge. ❤

 Happy Saturday! Thanks for stopping by. ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 26 – EARTH & WATER

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone! And TODAY IS #WORLD POETRY DAY!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

CONGRATULATIONS POETS! YOU’VE GRADUATED!

Starting this week, we are going to try something new. You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a footprint shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click HERE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 25th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CLOUDS & SPRING: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Clouded spring – Playing with words

Flowers and Clouds – Reena Saxena

Tanka: Clouds & Spring – Jane Dougherty Writes

When Nature Muse #2 (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #25 – Clouds & Spring – Two on a Rant

Acrostic – Spring Clouds – Mick E Talbot Poems EDIT

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #25 Clouds & Spring | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring – All About Writing and more

Spring Clouds | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Textured Twigs | thoughts and entanglements

Endless Seas (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Blossom | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo EDIT

Colleen’s Weekly. Tanka Poetry 25-Clouds and Spring – All About Writing and more EDIT

When Nature Muse #5 (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words EDIT

Tanka – Clouds & Spring | radhikasreflection

Clouds and Spring (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Tanka – Love is in the Air | Willow Poetry

Spring Waltz: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

As humanity prevails/ A #tanka – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Portents | method two madness

Waiting for Spring – A Tanka – colleenchesebro.com

This week’s Poet of the Week is Hélène Vaillant. Her Tanka poem called “Love is in the Air,” really spoke to me this week.

I was taken with her descriptions and the way she used her senses to describe the scene. The theme of love is clear from the descriptions and in the last two lines. Perfect!

https://abstract.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/1682879/

‘Love is in the Air’

majestic season
springing forth sensuous scents,
amorous bird calls.
You offered me Lilac blooms,
as the sun peeked through the clouds.

Hélène Vaillant©

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: EARTH & WATER

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Waiting for Spring – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “clouds” to “shroud,” and I left the word “spring.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image Credit: BrainyQuote.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Waiting for Spring

Winter winds beckon –
as gray mists shroud the mountain,
nature springs anew.
Just when I think it’s over
Mother Nature throws a blow.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: CLOUDS & SPRING, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo above.

STAY TUNED FOR NEXT TUESDAY’S POETRY CHALLENGE.
MY POETS HAVE GRADUATED, AND WE WILL BE STARTING SOMETHING NEW…

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps, you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017. 

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

 Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

A #Colorado Spring – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “fire” to “fiery,” and I left the word “rain.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: NotableQuotes.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Blown by winter gales –
field grasses dry and fallow,
fiery flames devour.
The meadow choked with dark smoke
mourns the delay of spring rains.

©2017 Colleen Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: FIRE & RAIN, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo below:

SPREAD THAT LOVE AND JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 23 – HELP & SMILE

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

tea-991046_1280

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 22nd CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – DOOR & FRIEND: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3) YES… I did not participate in my own challenge this week. I was just too busy. 😀

Tanka: Door & Friend – Jane Dougherty Writes

Welcome | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge – Door & Friend/Two on a Rant

Tanka – Door and Friend | radhikasreflection

The End of an Era – Reena Saxena

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #22 Door & Friend | Annette Rochelle Aben

Ivan Ivanovich (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 22 – “Door & Friend” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Tanka – Door & Friend – DeepikasRamblings

Tanka// friend &door// poetry challenge – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Tanka – Door & Friends: Uneasy Comfort/Crone Chronicler

The Journey: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Door & Friend | thoughts and entanglements

Doors (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Waiting for old friends. | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka-Door & Friend – All About Writing and more

What Was Lost – Tanka Poem – The Rolling Hills

Moon of Wandering | method two madness

This week’s Poet of the Week is Ina (VivaChange) from her blog, Crone Chronicler. Her Tanka poem called “Uneasy Comfort ” conveyed some uncomfortable truths we all face as we get older. I liked how she got feelings across to us with her choice of words.

Read the third and fourth lines. The emotion is there, and it is powerful.


Friend left ICU
We arrived to play word games
Hospital or no.
Underneath unspoken words
When will I go through this door?

©2017 Ina Hamilton Hart


Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: HELP & SMILE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 22 – “Door & Friend”

020617_2039_ColleensWee1.jpg

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 21st CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – FOG & RISE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” – All About Writing and more

Depth | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Tanka: Fog & change – Jane Dougherty Writes

A Riddle of Change/Two on a Rant

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #21 Fog & Change | Annette Rochelle Aben

The Fog is So Thick (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #21 – “Fog & Change” | Ladyleemanila

Fog & Change Tanka/suzhalgal

Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday: Prompt words – Fog and Change | The Dragon’s Lair

The Wrecker’s Player/Writing, Events, Competitions & Personal Musings

“The Lark Bunting” – A #Tanka #Poem – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge-Fog & Change – All About Writing and more

Tanka Challenge-21 – The Bag Lady

The Fog – Reena Saxena

Tanka Poem – Transformative Renewal – The Rolling Hills

Tanka – Fog & Change | radhikasreflection

Tanka – Fog and Change – DeepikasRamblings

Before The First Step – Thoughts of Words

Fog Recedes: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Alchemy | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Winter’s Freezing Fog | The Syllabub Sea

Before the First Step/Thoughts of Words Blog

Fog & Change/Thoughts & Entanglements

wavering | method two madness

No Time for Fun – Life at 17

This week’s Poet of the Week is Kerfe and Nina from their blog, Method Two Madness. I don’t know which one wrote the Tanka poem called “Wavering,” but I was literally blown away by the creativity.

The last two lines sum up the author’s feelings exactly! You know what else I loved? No punctuation. The lack of it conveys her message of disarray or confusion.

PLUS… The author did a painting! (I have space in my creative room for that beauty)! ❤

dislocated map
the trees have changed positions
air and light play tricks

hiding in the miasma
the zone between yes and no

©2017 Method Two Madness

~*~

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: DOOR & FRIEND

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

022017_1832_ColleensWee10.pngTANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find new reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #17 – “Storm & Color”

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

** IF YOU CAN’T FIND INSPIRATION FROM THE PROMPT WORDS… WRITE YOUR TANKA BASED OFF THE FEELINGS YOU GET WHEN YOU LOOK AT THIS PHOTO **

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address from silverthreading.com to colleenchesebro.com).

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hastags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 15th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – BLOOM & LATE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Winter roses – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #16 – BLOOM & LATE – Ladyleemanila

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #16 Bloom & Late | Annette Rochelle Aben

On time | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka Challenge | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Bloom & Late | thoughts and entanglements

Snowflake | method two madness

When the Time is Right (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Colleens Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #16 | bloom – late – Micks Blog

 Winter – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #16 – Bloom & Late/Two on a Rant

“Purple Genesis” & “Studious Young Girls” – TWO #Tankas – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is Marjorie Mallon of Kyrosmagica. Marje said this is her “first” Tanka. I loved her positive message, and hope you will too. The last line really spoke volumes to me! ❤

© 2017 Marjorie Mallon – Kyrosmagica Blog

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: STORM & COLOR

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the words don’t inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo above. 

TANKA TUESDAY!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find new reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

colleenchesebro.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


The Quest – A #Tanka

Hi! Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “change” to “alter,” and I let “beauty” stay the same. Both words have many connotations and can modify the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes the most subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry.

Please link your Tanka to my post found here.

At the beginning of the year, my mind is filled with the reflections of my life from the past year. The prompt words spoke to me this week. How about you?

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: beauty and change!

Alter your thinking –
to seek inherent beauty,
is change essential?
An attitude adjustment
overcomes my fate.

© Colleen M. Chesebro


Ringing in the New Year – A Tanka

121616_1902_TheAmberHai1.jpg

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly Tanka challenge. This week, I kept the prompt words of ‘last and few.’ Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. By the way, please link your Tanka to my post found here.

Ron and I have so much to be thankful for this year. My heart swells at the outpouring of love and friendship from my blogging community. Thank you all for making this a memorable year for me.

Don’s forget, great excitement lies just around the corner… On January 3, 2017, The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy will finally be published. I can hardly contain my excitement! 😀

I would like to take this time to wish you peace and happiness.

The last hours tarry –

between the Yule and New Year,

time is suspended.

When Auld Lang Syne sweetly sings

hope recharges our spirits.

© 2016 Colleen M. Chesebro

Happy New Year everyone! ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #14 – LAST & NEW

121216_1910_ColleensWee1.jpg

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months).

Happy Tanka Tuesday! Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 13th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WARM & CHEER: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Bonding over coffee – REINVENTIONS BY REENA

#AMWRITING COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY PROMPT CHALLENGE #13 – WARM & CHEER/Two on a Rant

gathered in one place | rivrvlogr

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge #13 Cheer & Warm | Annette Rochelle Aben

Snow (tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

The Yule Log – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

 Warm & Cheer | thoughts and entanglements

Wishes for 2017 | method two madness

Wishes for 2017, by Method Two Madness

Fighting for good cheer.
Returning to warmth, friends, home.
Setting voices free.

Making sense without despair:
choosing with hope.  And singing.

© 2016 Method Two Madness

I really enjoyed the above Tanka and thought her words expressed the holiday season perfectly!

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: LAST & NEW

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

#TANKA TUESDAY!

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES.

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I LOVE HEARING FROM YOU! 

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com   Twitter   Google+   Instagram

The Yule Log – A Tanka

Happy Winter Solstice!

Welcome to my contribution for my weekly Tanka challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt words: “warm = warmth and cheer = cheery.” Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. By the way, please link your Tanka to my post found here.

My husband and I decided to initiate a new tradition this year. We are celebrating the Winter Solstice in place of Christmas!

A few months ago, my brother in law had his DNA analyzed. The results were astounding! My husband’s family scored high for a Viking heritage. We were not surprised because they are all rather tall folks. My husband is 6 ft. 7 in., his brother 6 ft. 4 in., and his sister is 6 ft. tall! Let’s just say that the weekly television show called, The Vikings took on new meaning in our household. 😀

vikings-giphy

Image credit: Giphy.com

It seemed fitting to celebrate the Winter Solstice. Christmas had lost meaning for us through the years after the kids moved away. I did some research and found a great site that explains the tradition. Click here to learn more about a Winter Solstice Tradition. I also talk about my plans for our celebration on Mindful Monday on A Mindful Journeysite.wordpress.com, my other blog.

The cheery Yule log –
flames burn to honor the sun,
spreading warmth and light.
Our token good luck ashes
protection for the next year.

©2016 Colleen M. Chesebro

However, you celebrate the season, may you find peace and joy. Hugs!

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #12 – Peace & Spirit

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ and your weekly prompt post. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be dropped in the next few months).

A spot of tea, anyone? Grab a cup of Joe and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem.

It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper phase is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower phase, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

~*~

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK

Here are Jean’s instructions quoted from the site above with examples:

“1. Think of one or two simple images from a moment you have experienced and describe them in concrete terms — what you have seen, tasted, touched, smelled, or heard. Write the description in two or three lines. I will use lines from one of my own poems as an example:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

2. Reflect on how you felt or what you were thinking when you experienced this moment or perhaps later when you had time to think about it.

Regarding the moment described above, I thought about how often I have watched and photographed egrets. In fact, they even could be said to be a defining part of my life. My poetic instincts picked up on that word, “defining,” and I knew I had a clue as to what my next lines would be.

3. Describe these feelings or thoughts in the remaining two or three lines:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

4. Combine all five lines:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

5. Consider turning the third line of your poem into a pivot line, that is, a line that refers both to the top two lines as well as to the bottom two lines, so that either way they make sense grammatically. To do that, you may have to switch lines around.

Here’s my verse with the lines reordered to create a pivoting third line:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

To test the pivot line, divide the poem into two three-liners and see if each makes sense:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

6. Think about the form or structure of your verse. In Japan, tanka is often written in one line with segments consisting of 5-7-5-7-7 sound-symbols or syllables. Some people write English tanka in five lines with 5-7-5-7-7 syllable to approximate the Japanese model. You may wish to try writing tanka in this way. But Japanese syllables are shorter than English language syllables, resulting in shorter poems even though the syllable count is the same. To approximate the Japanese model, some poets use approximately 20-22 syllables and a short-long-short-long-long structure or even just a free form structure using five lines. You may wish to experiment with all these approaches. My egret verse is free form.

7. Decide where capitalization and punctuation may be needed, if at all.Tanka verses normally are not considered full sentences, and the first word in line 1 usually is not capitalized, nor is the last line end-stopped with a period. The idea is to keep the verse open and a bit fragmented or incomplete to encourage the reader to finish the verse in his or her imagination. Internal punctuation, while adding clarification, can stop the pivot line from working both up and down. In my verse, a colon could be added without disenabling the pivot:

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment:

an egret staring at me

me staring back

I decided to use indentation instead (The final product):

wondering for years

what would be

my life’s defining moment

an egret staring at me

me staring back

A few final tips before you write your first verse:

Commentary can be separate from the concrete images or woven into them. Even though commentary is fine, it’s a good policy — as in any fine poetry — to “show rather than tell.””

YOU GUYS!!

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 11th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – EYES & SHELTER: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Shacked Up | The Poetry Channel

#AMWRITING COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY PROMPT CHALLENGE #11 – EYES & SHELTER/Two on a Rant

Additional Tanka from Joelle, Two on a Rant left in comments: You did it to me again! A stream of consciousness tanka! (She likes it hot and lives in Florida, I like it cold and live in Colorado 😀 I love the play on words.
You are the ice queen,
and I am the fire queen,
we are sisters still.
Our kingdoms never to touch,
true friendship knows no degrees.

Eyes Wide Open (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Morning melt – Ontheland

Eyes & Shelter | thoughts and entanglements

Water is Life/Method Two Madness

The Dragon’s Lair: (She has been having problems with her blog and posted her tanka in the comments)

longing to go home
the eyes of the broken ones
water stony ground
finding no home or shelter
under Freedom’s skies.

The Prophecy – A Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly Haiku Poetry Prompt Challenge #11 Eyes & Shelter/Annette Rochelle Aben

 last daylight fading | rivrvlogr

M. Zane McClellan, from The Poetry Channel, and his Tanka called, “Shacked Up,” is our featured poet for this week.

My eyes are open
I know love is my shelter
and you are my love

I am held, but not possessed
With you is where I belong

M. Zane McClellan

Copyright © 2016
All rights reserved

~*~

What a beautiful love poem Tanka. He made ME feel the words. How about you? 😀


Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PEACE & SPIRIT

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.


#TANKA TUESDAY!

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO REPLY IN THE COMMENTS WITH WORD SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE TANKA CHALLENGES.

Read more on Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just click on the link to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME

 Twitter Facebook Google+ Instagram A Mindful Journey Site


The Prophecy – A Tanka

Once again for my Tanka challenge, I kept the prompt words of eyes and shelter. Both words have many connotations and can change the meaning of your Tanka poetry in numerous ways. By the way, please link your Tanka to the prompt post found here.

Hooded eyes conceal –

a mute prophecy of death

sheltered in evil.

The Fairy Whisperer knows

the swamp takes care of their own.

© Colleen M. Chesebro


It’s getting closer to the release date of The Heart Stone Chronicles – The Swamp Fairy. Have I piqued your interest?



Thanks for stopping by…




Looking Forward – A Tanka

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone. Cold winds are racing across the foothills on this fine Colorado day. The sky is a pale blue, and a white haze of clouds has crept over the mountains. Ron is working in the kitchen preparing a fabulous meal to commemorate the day. The holidays are hard for me each year, and as I get older, they seem harder to celebrate. Writing helps…

I chose the following words in reply to the prompt words of ‘beginning and thanks,’ for my Tanka this week: for beginning, I used, “set in motion,” and for thanks, I used “grace.”

Bleak lamentations –

bitter winds howling in grief,

autumn’s last hurrah.

Winter snows set in motion

my grace to begin anew.

~*~

©Colleen M. Chesebro

Photos: Courtsey of Pixabay.com

I hope your day is filled with much love and happiness… and turkey too!

Freedom – A Tanka

The crisis goes on –

fear mongering overflows,

rage fills broken hearts.

The revolution descends

changing futures forever.

~Colleen Chesebro~

All of us value our free speech. It is that freedom that has allowed us to share our thoughts on our blogs and in our many writings. Writing has always been a way for me to deal with the feelings that roll around inside my head. Just think for a moment if the government censored our freedom to speech. Where would we be?

The first step in destabilizing a government is to limit the people’s freedom of speech.

Wikipedia shares (click the highlighted links below to learn more):

“The First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, ensuring that there is no prohibition on the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble, or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances. It was adopted on December 15, 1791, as one of the ten amendments that constitute the Bill of Rights.”

Know your rights. Hugs and love to all.

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #7 – CELEBRATE & WATCH

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be discontinued in the next few months)


Have you been looking for me? I’m working on my second book, The Meadow Fairy. During my first week, I’ve written a total of 8,373 words! I’m a bit behind but no matter – I’m going to keep writing!

LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THIS EXCITING POETRY FORM. Did these instructions help last week? Here they are again, as a reminder:

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem. It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

At Study.com, there is an excellent discussion on how to write a Tanka. This is part of a lesson you would have to pay for so I have quoted the best part of that site. I color coded the things for you to consider when writing your own Tanka:

“Tanka poems are a traditional Japanese style of poetry that follows a set pattern. In this lesson, you’ll learn the structure of the tanka, be introduced to its subject matter, and be presented with examples of this type of poetry.

Original Tanka Poetry Example

the color of the cherry blossom

has faded in vain

in the long rain

while in idle thoughts

I have spent my life.

– Ono no Komachi (circa 850) Original Japanese Tanka

See below for more directions

You may be familiar with haiku, a traditional style of Japanese poetry containing only three lines. The poem above is a tanka, another style of Japanese poetry. Tanka poems are quite similar to haiku, and in this lesson, you’ll learn how they are structured and what you might expect to find in a tanka poem.

Tanka Structure and Content

Tanka poems, when written in Japanese, follow a pattern of syllables 5-7-5-7-7. In other words, the first and third lines contain only five syllables each, while the second, fourth, and fifth lines have seven syllables. When translated into English the syllable count is usually thrown off, which is why our example has nine syllables in the first line. There would only be five in the original Japanese version.

Additionally, each tanka is divided into two parts. The first three lines are the upper phrase, and the last two lines are the lower phrase.

The upper phrase typically contains an image, and the lower phrase presents the poet’s ideas about that image

Many traditional poetic forms have a turn, a place where the poem shifts, and for the tanka, this happens between the upper and lower phrase. In our example, the poet presents an image of faded cherry blossoms, and after the turn, she compares her own life to the wasted beauty of those blossoms.

While haiku poems are usually about nature, tanka is often personal reflections on love and other strong emotions. Tanka also uses figurative language. In the example, above, the poet creates a metaphor connecting the wilted cherry blossoms to her life.”

My example:

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye? You end up with lines of syllables totaling, 5/7/5/7/7.

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to write your feelings into this poetry form.

I hope this helps to explain the “TURN,” or “PIVOT.” Remember: create an image in your mind with the first three lines, and in the last two lines give us your opinion or thoughts about that mind-picture.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use Fotoflexer, Picmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 6th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – WIND & GRACE: (I hope you are visiting the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

#Tanka Challenge Wind and Grace  | Potholes in the Road of Life

Tanka Tuesday: Wind & Grace – Image & Word

Wind & Grace | thoughts and entanglements

Colleens Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 Wind & Grace | Annette Rochelle Aben

Test of Faith – Leara writes and other creative things…

Winds of Grace | The Poetry Channel

Wind and Grace #Tanka – ladyleemanila

storm clouds approaching | rivrvlogr

Tanka – Wind/Grace | Mother Willow

Grace | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Wind of Grace | imanikingblog

#Tanka Challenge 6 @ColleenChesebro – MEANINGS AND MUSINGS

Windswept to Grace | Stutter-Stepping Heart

Test of Faith – Leara Writes & Take Pics

Tanka Wind & Grace – Neel Writes Blog

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 Wind & Grace – Two on a Rant

Waving With Grace – Naa Prapancham, My World

Last Dance – Naa Prapancham, My World

The Graceful Winds of Love – Chasing Life & Finding Dreams

She Deserted his World & Left – Life at Seventeen

JOB!

Did those instructions help you to get the pivot last week? Here is a Tanka that was spot on!

Each week I am going to share a Tanka I thought was special BECAUSE it conveyed the author’s feelings.

The above Tanka is from Greg at Potholes in the Road of Life. I love how he got his feelings into the Tanka! ❤

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CELEBRATE & WATCH

 (any forms of the words AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

I got creative this week and used “applaud” for the word celebrate, and I used the word, “behold,” for the word, watch. There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment.

A seasonal change –
behold the cold winds blowing,
fingers of frost etched
against my dark window panes
I applaud nature’s artwork.

~Colleen Chesebro~

SHARE YOUR TANKA! IT’S TIME TO GET YOUR TANKA ON! ❤

READ MORE ON SILVER’S MONTHLY FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find exciting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love, each month. Just fly over to my sign up page and enter your email. ❤

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #6 WIND & GRACE

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

(Please note: I changed my blog name and address to colleenchesebro.com. silverthreading.com will be discontinued in the next few months)

It’s November 1st! 2016 is almost over!

BUT FIRST! LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THIS EXCITING POETRY FORM

I have received many questions about how to write a Tanka poem. It is worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

At Study.com, there is an excellent discussion on how to write a Tanka. This is part of a lesson you would have to pay for so I have quoted the best part of that site. I color coded the things for you to consider when writing your own Tanka:

“Tanka poems are a traditional Japanese style of poetry that follows a set pattern. In this lesson, you’ll learn the structure of the tanka, be introduced to its subject matter, and be presented with examples of this type of poetry.

Tanka Poetry Example

the color of the cherry blossom

has faded in vain

in the long rain

while in idle thoughts

I have spent my life.

– Ono no Komachi (circa 850) Original Japanese Tanka

You may be familiar with haiku, a traditional style of Japanese poetry containing only three lines. The poem above is a tanka, another style of Japanese poetry. Tanka poems are quite similar to haiku, and in this lesson, you’ll learn how they are structured and what you might expect to find in a tanka poem.

Tanka Structure and Content

Tanka poems, when written in Japanese, follow a pattern of syllables 5-7-5-7-7. In other words, the first and third lines contain only five syllables each, while the second, fourth, and fifth lines have seven syllables. When translated into English the syllable count is usually thrown off, which is why our example has nine syllables in the first line. There would only be five in the original Japanese version.

Additionally, each tanka is divided into two parts. The first three lines are the upper phrase, and the last two lines are the lower phrase.

The upper phrase typically contains an image, and the lower phrase presents the poet’s ideas about that image.

Many traditional poetic forms have a turn, a place where the poem shifts, and for the tanka, this happens between the upper and lower phrase. In our example, the poet presents an image of faded cherry blossoms, and after the turn, she compares her own life to the wasted beauty of those blossoms.

While haiku poems are usually about nature, tanka is often personal reflections on love and other strong emotions. Tanka also uses figurative language. In the example, above, the poet creates a metaphor connecting the wilted cherry blossoms to her life.”

My example:

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye? You end up with lines of syllables totaling, 5/7/5/7/7.

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to write your feelings into this poetry form.

I hope this helps to explain the “TURN,” or “PIVOT.” Remember: create an image in your mind with the first three lines, and then in the last two lines give us your opinion or thoughts about that image.


Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 5th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – SHAPES & HEART: (I hope you are visiting the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Tanka Tuesday: Shapes & Heart – Image & Word

neelwritesblog/poem/tanka/Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #5 SHAPES & HEART/25/10/2016 | neelwritesblog

Shapes and Heart – ladyleemanila

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #5 Shapes & Heart | Annette Rochelle Aben

Creative day – My words, My life

Shapes & Heart | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka – Shapes/Heart | Mother Willow

Shape and Heart #Tanka | Potholes in the Road of Life

long distance longing | rivrvlogr

To Withstand the Storm – Leara writes and other creative things…

Shape of the Heart | imanikingblog

To Tell You – Naa Prapancham, My World

Lil Hearts – Naa Prapancham, My World

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #5 SHAPES & HEART – Always a Writer

Shapes & Heart – Thoughts & Entanglements

Creative Day – My Words, My Life

SILVER’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY PROMPT CHALLENGE #5 SHAPES & HEART – Two on a Rant

Echo – Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Love Shapes the Heart – Stutter-Stepping Heart

I am thrilled with the creativity you displayed in last week’s Tanka poems. Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are our two words for this week’s challenge: WIND & GRACE

 (any forms of the words, AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

I got creative this week and used “serpentine” for the word wind (as in twist or coil), and I used the word, “adorned,” for grace. There are many different meanings to these words that you can tap into. Have fun and experiment.

The Magnolia

Serpentine limbs –
adorned with bright pink blossoms
beauty exalted.
A life lived with dignity
rooted benevolently.

Colleen Chesebro

THE BREAKDOWN:

First I created the image with the first three lines:

Serpentine limbs –

adorned with bright pink blossoms

beauty exalted.

In the last two lines, I gave my opinion or personal thoughts.

A life lived with dignity

rooted benevolently.


COME ON! Join in and share your Tanka poem.

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #5 SHAPES & HEART

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Silver’s having Red Rooibos Tea this week!

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all of my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

Poets.org gives the definition and the rules for the writing of a Tanka. Please note the following from the site:

“In many ways, the tanka resembles the sonnet, certainly in terms of treatment of the subject. Like the sonnet, the tanka employs a turn, known as a pivotal image, which marks the transition from the examination of an image to the examination of the personal response. This turn is located within the third line, connecting the kami-no-ku, or upper poem, with the shimo-no-ku, or lower poem.”

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye? You end up with 5/7/5/7/7.

My example:

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to join your feelings into this poetry form.

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you want to make your images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 4th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – PASSION & CHEER:

Passion and Cheer – ladyleemanila

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge 4 Passion & Cheer | Annette Rochelle Aben

cheerful call brings mate | rivrvlogr

Poet’s Passion and Cheer | Stutter-Stepping Heart

Zou and his family – My words, My life

Passion & Cheer | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka – Watercolour | Mother Willow

Big Indian Cricket Fan – Naa Prapancham,My World…

Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #4 Passion & Cheer – Always a Writer


I was astounded by the creativity displayed in last week’s Tanka poems. I think you Tanka poets are getting better and better each week.

Since you did so well last week, are you ready to have another go at it?

Here are our two words for this week’s challenge: SHAPES & HEART (any forms of the words, AND don’t forget that you can use synonyms)

I kept it simple this week and used “forms” for the word shapes, and I kept the word, “heart.” There are many different meanings to these words that you can tap into. Have fun and experiment.

Colleen Chesebro

COME ON! Join in and share your Tanka poem. You even get to “dance” around the words! Enjoy! See you next week. ❤

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #3 Hope & Wait

Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get your poetry groove on? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all of my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

Poets.org gives the definition and the rules for the writing of a Tanka. Please note the following from the site:

“In many ways, the tanka resembles the sonnet, certainly in terms of treatment of the subject. Like the sonnet, the tanka employs a turn, known as a pivotal image, which marks the transition from the examination of an image to the examination of the personal response. This turn is located within the third line, connecting thekami-no-ku, or upper poem, with the shimo-no-ku, or lower poem.”

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye?

My example:

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to join your feelings into this poetry form.

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or click like. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your own photos and create “Visual Tankas” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you wish to make your own images. Click the links to go to the programs.

I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your own post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 2nd  CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – MAGIC & GLITTER:

Resurrected Heart | The Poetry Channel

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #2 Magic & Glitter | Annette Rochelle Aben

Magic & Glitter | thoughts and entanglements

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #2 Magic & Glitter – ladyleemanila

Tanka – Magic/Glitter | Mother Willow

magic greets the eye | rivrvlogr

Blinding rhetoric – Ontheland

Tanka | Potholes in the Road of Life

Tanka 2 for Today | Potholes in the Road of Life

Sunrise – Leara writes and other creative things…

Starry Sky – My words, My life

Sunrise – Leara Writes & Takes Pics

Nature – Naa Prapancham, My World

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #2 Magic & Glitter – Two on a Rant

Green Fairy | Lemon Shark Reef

Your Tanka poems made me smile with joy! You guys are the best! Thanks for sharing the beauty of your words.

Are you ready to write a Tanka?

Here are our two words for this week’s challenge: HOPE & WAIT (any forms of the words)

For hope, I used aspiration

For wait, I used waiting

“My Dream”

An aspiration –

A dream of ink on paper,

Words swirl in my head

Stories begging to be told,

Books waiting to be written.

by
Colleen Chesebro

Come on… I know you want to do it. Share your Tanka poem with us! Don’t forget to link to this post. See you next week!

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #2 Magic & Glitter

Happy Tuesday everyone! Are you ready to get your poetry groove on? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has.

Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

Poets.org gives the definition and the rules for the writing of a Tanka. Please note the following from the site:

“In many ways, the tanka resembles the sonnet, certainly in terms of treatment of the subject. Like the sonnet, the tanka employs a turn, known as a pivotal image, which marks the transition from the examination of an image to the examination of the personal response. This turn is located within the third line, connecting thekami-no-ku, or upper poem, with the shimo-no-ku, or lower poem.”

Writing a Tanka is like writing a Haiku (5/7/5) and adding two more lines. See how much more of a “visual image” you get in your mind’s eye?

My example:

Did you recognize the pivot in the third line? We start talking about my solitude, and then we switch to talking about the leaves of red and gold. The words are all connected and are talking about my response to autumn. It is important to try to join your feelings into your Tanka.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com. She gives excellent instructions on how to join your feelings into this poetry form.

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
time). That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M (noon). This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

To do a Ping Back: Copy the URL (the http:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

People from the challenge may visit you and comment or click like. I also need at least a Ping Back or a link in the comments section to know you participated and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your own photos and create “Visual Tankas” if you wish, although it is not necessary. You can use FotoflexerPicmonkey, or Canva.com, or any other program that you wish to make your own images. Click the links to go to the programs.


I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your own post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 1ST CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – HARVEST & MOON:

Silver’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Prompt Challenge #1 Harvest & Moon – ladyleemanila

Tanka Tuesday – Harvest & Moon – Image & Word

Silver’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Prompt Challenge 1 Harvest & Moon | Annette Rochelle Aben

Harvest & Moon | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka – Harvest/Moon | Mother Willow

Hope | Lemon Shark Reef

New moon – Ontheland

Reaping no answers | Chasing Life and Finding Dreams

what was new is old | rivrvlogr 

Rainfall – My words, My life

Harvest – Leara writes and other creative things…

Two on a Rant

Mother Willow

LearaWrites & Takes Pics

Naa Prapancham

Thank you so much for joining in and making our first challenge such a huge success. I loved your creativity!

FOR A JOB WELL DONE!

Are you ready to write a Tanka?

Here are our two words for this week’s challenge: MAGIC & GLITTER

I used magical for “magic,” and “glistening,” for glitter.

Image credit: Facebook Page – Fairies, Myths, & Magic

Glistening wings wave

as meadow fairies float near,

magical voices –

charged sparks of recognition,

all oblique recollections.

Colleen Chesebro

See you next week! Don’t forget to link your post to this one! I can’t wait to read your Tanka poetry. Hugs.