“The Happiness of Flowers,” #Butterfly #Cinquain

Here’s a butterfly cinquain for our Tanka Tuesday theme of flowers, and why we love a certain one best. I can’t say that I have a favorite flower. I really love them all.

If I had to choose, it would be the daylily. It’s a hardy plant that can stand the harsh Michigan winters and even does well in the hot tropical sun in Florida. I’ve grown daylilies everywhere I’ve lived, except the desert. The 120 degrees F. heat was just too much for them.

There are so many varieties and color options from yellow to dark red, with all the tangerine oranges in between. Don’t forget fushia!

Image by Ulrike Leone from Pixabay
"The Happiness of Flowers"

lilacs
red daylilies
lily of the valley
lavender, and delphinium—
flowers
that brings joyfulness to my heart
tending the soil with love
rainfall awards
new growth

©2021 Colleen M. Chesebro

I’ve been itching to get my hands in the soil and to start planing. But first, there are bushes and a tree with roots growing above the ground to tear out, and compost to add to the soil. Dustin, my son from another mother, has volunteered to help me clear out the old bushes and trees that were never cared for. We’re blessed to have his help.

Once the bushes in the front are taken care of, we can move to the back where three plum trees were planted, then hacked down to bush size. The trees are in rough shape. They have to be removed as the tops were chopped off of them.

The best thing about gardening is that you can take your time. It’s therapeutic to work in the soil. It will be good to spend some time outside this summer. I can’t wait!

“Melancholy Autumn,” #Haiku

This week’s theme for our poetry challenge is a haiku written by Sue Vincent:

clouds cover the moon, 
beyond dawn's pale horizon 
sun rises unseen  

©2020 Sue Vincent

The idea is to use Sue’s haiku as inspiration for your own syllabic poetry. Remember, in this challenge we can use any of the following poetry forms:

Haiku, Senryu, Haiga, Tanka, Gogyohka, Renga, Solo-Renga, Haibun, Tanka Prose, Cinquain, and its variations, Etheree, Nonet, and Shadorma

Image by imagii from Pixabay

silver mist conceals
shadows of past and present
cleansed by icy rain

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Let’s Talk About Haiku

HAIKU IN ENGLISH: Traditional Haiku in English is written in three lines with five syllables in the first line, seven syllables in the second line, and five syllables in the last line: 5/7/5, for a total of seventeen syllables written in the present tense.

Haiku do not rhyme, nor do they contain metaphors and similes. The use of an implied metaphor is acceptable.

The current standards for creating Haiku in English suggest a form with three lines and syllables of 3/5/3 (11 syllables). Even the more abbreviated haiku version with three lines and syllables of 2/3/2 (7 syllables) is now thought of more favorably than the traditional 5/7/5 format. Hybrid haiku are written with seventeen-syllables in one or more lines.

Most haiku are written about nature, the seasons, a beautiful moment in nature, an emotional experience while in nature, or change. A haiku should share a special moment of awareness with the reader.

There is often a seasonal word used to explain the time of year, called a kigo, which is a seasonal description, such as: Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter, and New Year’s. There should only be one kigo per haiku. It’s up to the poet to decide if they want to include a kigo in their poem.

Most haiku do not contain titles.

The use of punctuation is optional in the creation of the haiku.

Three or more haiku written together are considered a series or sequence.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.

“The Illusion of Power,” tanka prose/haiku

Twirl your wands and cast your spells, for power exerted over others leads them to behave in ways they would not otherwise behave. The veil is thinning as the energy shifts. Be careful what you wish for…

“The Illusion of Power Spell”

On this Samhain eve of the full blue moon, I wait until midnight darkens the shadowy edges of the glen. I dip the tip of my right index finger into moon oil as I trace the shape of the orb on the flat surface of a nearby stump. Within the circle, I place four white candles around the edge, adding the fifth one in the middle. With a snap of my fingers, the candles are lit.

I call to the moon
 to receive her powers cast
 tonight, caught and kept
 used for good intent only
 that no evil shall arise.

Brilliant moon, may your 
 blessings and vitality
 live within my heart.

©2020 Colleen M. Chesebro

Happy Halloween!

Marsha picked the theme for this week’s Tanka Tuesday challenge. I broke my own poetry rules this week… and it was so fun! I started out with a bit of tanka prose, including the accompanying tanka. Next, I added the haiku at the end to round out this poem.

Join me every Tuesday on wordcraftpoetry.com for the Tanka Tuesday Syllabic Poetry Challenge.