“Awakening Dawn” – A Haibun #WorldPoetryDay

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of earth and water. Today is #WorldPoetryDay!

This week, I decided to try my hand at a Haibun. This is my first attempt, and I think I am hooked. I chose alternating prose and verse as my style (prose, Haiku, prose, Haiku). I kept the word “earth,” and used “tears,” for water.

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your prose & poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: Pinterest: Writeathome: Quotes on Writing

Please link your poem contribution to my post found here.

Image credit: Pixabay.com

Awakening Dawn – A Haibun

I trudge through brown stalks of prairie grasses sprouting from the dry earth as swirling dust devils dance around me. The land is parched, and a dirty grime hangs in the air. I taste a fine grit on my tongue and smell the acrid scent of smoke from a fire whose embers still glow like citron on the horizon. Loss overwhelms me and tears slip from my eyes.

death sticks to this place
barren and without appeal
just the strong survive

Sadly, I turn toward a copse of brilliantly colored trees, a temporary detour from my usual path. From within the whirling yellow leaves of a Quaking Aspen, a Lark Bunting soars into the gray dawn singing the song of the meadow fairy.

shifting perceptions
while my awareness expands
enchantment appears

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems

#Haiku, #Tanka, #5lines, #micropoetry, #poetry, #Haibun

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the words: EARTH & WATER, or if you need some visual inspiration, write your poem and tell us of your feelings and descriptions from the photo below:

SEE YOU NEXT WEEK FOR POETRY TUESDAY!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 26 – EARTH & WATER

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone! And TODAY IS #WORLD POETRY DAY!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

CONGRATULATIONS POETS! YOU’VE GRADUATED!

Starting this week, we are going to try something new. You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a footprint shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click HERE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 25th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CLOUDS & SPRING: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Clouded spring – Playing with words

Flowers and Clouds – Reena Saxena

Tanka: Clouds & Spring – Jane Dougherty Writes

When Nature Muse #2 (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge #25 – Clouds & Spring – Two on a Rant

Acrostic – Spring Clouds – Mick E Talbot Poems EDIT

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #25 Clouds & Spring | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring – All About Writing and more

Spring Clouds | The Syllabub Sea

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Textured Twigs | thoughts and entanglements

Endless Seas (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Blossom | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo EDIT

Colleen’s Weekly. Tanka Poetry 25-Clouds and Spring – All About Writing and more EDIT

When Nature Muse #5 (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words EDIT

Tanka – Clouds & Spring | radhikasreflection

Clouds and Spring (Tanka) – Uniquesus

Tanka – Love is in the Air | Willow Poetry

Spring Waltz: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

As humanity prevails/ A #tanka – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Portents | method two madness

Waiting for Spring – A Tanka – colleenchesebro.com

This week’s Poet of the Week is Hélène Vaillant. Her Tanka poem called “Love is in the Air,” really spoke to me this week.

I was taken with her descriptions and the way she used her senses to describe the scene. The theme of love is clear from the descriptions and in the last two lines. Perfect!

https://abstract.desktopnexus.com/wallpaper/1682879/

‘Love is in the Air’

majestic season
springing forth sensuous scents,
amorous bird calls.
You offered me Lilac blooms,
as the sun peeked through the clouds.

Hélène Vaillant©

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: EARTH & WATER

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

#BookReview – The Heartstone Chronicles

I must share this heartfelt review of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy written by author and editor, P. C. Zick. This one brought tears to my eyes! ❤

P.C. Zick - Author/Editor

The Heart Stone Chronicles, Book 1 The Swamp FairyColleen Chesebro has made a splash with Book 1 in her Swamp Fairy series, The Heart Stone Chronicles. Not only is it the first book in this series, but it’s her first published novel. And it’s a gem of a story.

All right, puns aside, this novel will fascinate and inspire young women on the cusp of adulthood. Set in the swamps of northwest Florida near Pensacola, Ms. Chesebro uses the setting of the swamp to create a magical story mixed with the reality of being a teen uprooted by the death of a mother and the abdication of a father.

Fortunately, Abigale Forrester, at the age of fourteen, has plenty of people rooting for her from her mother’s best friend in Chicago, where she’s left without either father or mother, and a dear sweet aunt in Florida where Abigale is sent.

It is in the rural setting of Florida where…

View original post 621 more words

AND… The Winner is…

Drumroll please…

There were 51 Total Entries in my contest where

One Winner Receives a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy ~ Where Magic Comes Alive

(OFFER GOOD IN U.S., CANADA, & U.K. ONLY)

Fourteen-year-old Abigale Forester, recently orphaned and a ward of the State of Illinois moves from Chicago to Florida to live with her aunt, her last living relative. Magnolia Forester becomes her legal Guardian, and together they claim an ancient inheritance; land that belonged to Abby’s mother’s family for generations.

Holding onto the only piece of her mother Abby has left, a calcite pendant and her mother’s most sacred possession, she discovers the truth of her legacy. The pendant is more significant than she could possibly imagine. Forged from a giant mystical heart-shaped stone found on the very swamp land Abby now owns, it holds the power of her ancestors.

But with that power comes greater responsibility, one that pits her against Rafe Cobb, a greedy land developer, who will stop at nothing to own Abby’s swamp land.

As Abby learns to be part of a family again and explores her love of horses with friends, Savanna, Blake, and Cash, the swamp slowly gives up some of its secrets. She is summoned by a primeval nymph, who teaches Abby that her true destiny is to protect the nymphs from evil in an ever-changing modern world.

Can Abby save the swamp and the Naiad Nymph Clan from certain destruction before it is too late?

I had GLEAM select the Winning Entry

Entry #42

Teagan G

Read the results on my Facebook Page:
https://gleam.io/fb/fN2aS

Terms & Conditions |  Powered by Gleam

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

Many thanks to all of you who took the time to enter my St. Patrick’s Day book giveaway. Your support means the world to me.

SPREAD THAT FAIRY MAGIC ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Waiting for Spring – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “clouds” to “shroud,” and I left the word “spring.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image Credit: BrainyQuote.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Waiting for Spring

Winter winds beckon –
as gray mists shroud the mountain,
nature springs anew.
Just when I think it’s over
Mother Nature throws a blow.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: CLOUDS & SPRING, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo above.

STAY TUNED FOR NEXT TUESDAY’S POETRY CHALLENGE.
MY POETS HAVE GRADUATED, AND WE WILL BE STARTING SOMETHING NEW…

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps, you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017. 

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

 Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Happy St. Patrick’s Day Book GIVEAWAY

This year, I decided to celebrate with a contest where one lucky reader can win a signed copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy, my debut novel published in January of this year.

This is my first contest, and if all goes well, I will be doing more of these in the future.

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps, you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017.

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Amazon KDP and Kindle Unlimited: What It Means for Authors and Publishers – Written Word Media

 

I confused Kindle KDP and Kindle Unlimited the other day. Here is the scoop on these two programs from Amazon. ❤

Amazon KDP and Kindle Unlimited: A Primer for Authors and Publishers

Source: Amazon KDP and Kindle Unlimited: What It Means for Authors and Publishers – Written Word Media

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 25 – Clouds & Spring

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 24th CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – FIRE & RAIN: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 24 – FIRE & RAIN/Two on a Rant

Fire & Rain – Playing with words

Tanka: Fire & Rain – Jane Dougherty Writes

Soul on Fire – Reena Saxena

When Nature Muse (Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

“FIRE & RAIN” – Mick E Talbot Poems

Promise | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #24 Fire and Rain | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 24 – “FIRE & RAIN” | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Untouched by the Rain (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Fire & Rain | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka //Poetry Challenge// Rain & Fire – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Fireflies | The Syllabub Sea

Coming of Spring: Tanka | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

When the Cold Wind Blows | method two madness

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #24 Fire & Rain/Deepikas Ramblings

A #Colorado Spring – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

This week’s Poet of the Week is Method Two Madness (Kerfe & Nina). Excellent imagery in her words and make sure and play the song while you are reading her Tanka.

Read the fourth line! The description is excellent.

If you see fire, if
fire is spilled, smothered by rain,
stolen from the sun–

are bridges burned, rivers run
dry?  A cold flaming.  Unquenched.

©2017 Method Two Madness

James Taylor released his album “Sweet Baby James” in 1970, the year I graduated from high school.  It was a constant in my life for the next few years and remains a touchstone for remembering that time.


When Colleen titled her tanka challenge this week “Fire and Rain,” James Taylor’s song immediately began to play in my head.  Almost all the songs on “Sweet Baby James” talk about the sun, yet there’s a touch of melancholy in every word.  Colleen’s prompt photo, too, seems to reflect these contradictory feelings.  Endings, beginnings:  fire and rain.  My tanka is an imagined conversation with the album and the song.

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CLOUDS & SPRING

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps, you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017. 

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

 Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Mindful Monday – P. S. I Forgive You, by D. G. Kaye

A mindful book review of P. S. I Forgive You, by D. G. Kaye ❤

A Mindful Journey

Welcome to Mindful Monday. Each week I look at new or sometimes old things about myself on my journey to becoming more conscious about my life journey. I have found that being mindful encompasses the act of being watchful, aware, wary, heedful, alert, careful, or attentive, in whatever area in my life I feel it applies to, as I try to engage in the present.

Come and join me on my journey. You never know what you will learn about yourself.

I have something different for you this week. It’s a book review of a novel that touched me deeply. The subject matter had to do with a journey and a liberation of pent up emotions that enabled the author to find peace. If that is not a mindful journey, I don’t know what is.

Mindfulness is about change, understanding, and acceptance of who we are and who we want…

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St. Patrick’s Day Giveaway – Enter to Win a Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

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Welcome to my St. Patrick’s Day celebration!

TODAY’S THE DAY!

You see, I was lucky enough to be named “Colleen,” which means “girl” in Ireland. I have only known two other “Colleen’s” in my life. My name is unusual in America but seems to be gaining popularity.

I have been told that if you are named Colleen, your parents did it to connect to their Irish roots. I don’t know about that. I was born from parents who were German/Russian immigrants. Nevertheless, I enjoy celebrating the Irish roots of my first name!

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Chicago, Image credit: Pixabay.com

Each year on March 17th across the world, we join together as the Irish and the “Irish at heart,” to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. The holiday began with the humble beginnings of a religious feast day to honor the patron saint of Ireland.

a-spot-of-tea-anyone

Now, St. Patrick’s Day has become an international celebration of Irish culture featuring parades, green rivers, green beer, and GREEN TEA! Did I mention shamrocks and green?

This year, I decided to celebrate with a contest where one lucky reader can win a signed copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy, my debut novel published in January of this year.

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This is my first contest and if all goes well, I will be doing more of these in the future.

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

Contest open to the U.S, Canada, and in the U.K

There are three ways to win: Sign up for Colleen’s Monthly Fairy Whispers Newsletter and/or follow Colleen Chesebro – Fairy Whisperer on Facebook, and/or follow @ColleenChesebro on Twitter. Once you have completed these steps you are entered into the contest.

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day this contest runs from March 12, 2017, through March 18, 2017. 

This is a random drawing using the Gleam Competitions App. On March 19, 2017, I will announce the winner on my blog: colleenchesebro.com.

The winner must notify me by email at colleenchesebro3@gmail.com and provide me with their address NLT March 22, 2017, so that I can mail their signed copy to them. Please allow two weeks after the end of this contest for mailing time.

facebook-cover

 Are you excited?

What are you waiting for?

Click the link below to enter for your chance to win!

Enter to Win a Signed Copy of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

cheerio

A #Colorado Spring – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “fire” to “fiery,” and I left the word “rain.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: NotableQuotes.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Blown by winter gales –
field grasses dry and fallow,
fiery flames devour.
The meadow choked with dark smoke
mourns the delay of spring rains.

©2017 Colleen Chesebro

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: FIRE & RAIN, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo below:

SPREAD THAT LOVE AND JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

Amazon Prime – Is it Worth My Time?

Yesterday, I wrote about the need for book reviews and how important it is for authors to find reviewers for their books. I have been trying to buy one or two books a month to help support my fellow writers. Sometimes I can do this, other times I can’t.

I know the reviews of books that have been bought are the reviews that potential readers see first. The last time I read Amazon’s review rules, it said that authors can have 5 non-Amazon Verified Purchase reviews each week. I have added the quotes below:

Here are some quotes from the Amazon site:

“Book authors and publishers may continue to provide free or discounted copies of their books to readers, as long as the author or publisher does not require a review in exchange or attempt to influence the review.”

Additional Guidelines for Customer Reviews

“The following guidelines apply to Customer Reviews in addition to the other guidelines set forth above:

If your review is removed or rejected because it does not comply with our guidelines concerning promotional content, you may not resubmit a review on the same product, even if the resubmitted review includes different content.

Reviews may only include URLs or links to other products sold on Amazon.

Customers in the same household may not post multiple reviews of the same product.

Customers can submit 5 non-Amazon Verified Purchase reviews each week. Non-Amazon Verified Purchase review counts are calculated each week from Sunday at 12:00 am GMT through Saturday 11:59 pm GMT. This policy does not apply to Vine reviews or reviews on digital and physical books, music, and video.

When we find unusually high numbers of reviews for a product posted in a short period of time, we may restrict the number of non-Amazon Verified Purchase reviews on that product.

To learn more about Amazon Verified Purchase views refer to About Amazon Verified Purchase Reviews.”

Now, I have some questions, and if you know the answers point me in the right direction… I have been thinking about getting an Amazon Prime membership so that I can buy books for reviews and stream music to my Alexa device.

It is my understanding that an author is paid royalties by the number of pages read when the book is bought from Prime. If that is incorrect, please explain to me how this works. I only want to get Prime if the author is not hurt from the program. Obviously, I will read the entire book (good or bad).

The subscription is $99 per year, and I could buy all the books I wanted. Here’s the rub… Will my reviews be considered an Amazon Verified Purchase? If they are NOT, I see no reason to buy the Prime subscription.

If you know the answers to these questions, Please, let me know…

Book Reviews & WHY They Matter

As an avid reader, I have spent the last few years reviewing books on my blog and on other websites that help to promote Indy Authors. It has been an honor to read and review over one hundred and forty books in the last couple of years.

There are several reasons why I engaged in the review process:

  1. Writing a review has been my way of saying thank you to the author. Writing a book is a long and detailed process, and as an author, I know how much work I put into my own writing. I can think of no better way to let an author know that I appreciated all the hard work they put into writing a novel other than helping to spread the word of their success.
  2. My reviews contributed to spreading the word to other readers about authors and books that I enjoyed. I have always felt that I was performing a public service to other readers by sharing my thoughts in our blogging community.
  3. I have written reviews in such a way as to not damage the reputation of the author. Even if I did not like the book, I found ways to express my opinion in a nice way. In fact, there have not been many books that I haven’t enjoyed. This just goes to show the quality of authors and material in the Indy community.
  4. Reviews help the author, and those positive rankings play into the Amazon algorithm. More reviews = More sales, which lead to a higher ranking in the Amazon community. The end result is exposure to more people interested in buying books.
  5. I have solicited and received free manuscripts and copies of most of the books I reviewed. If you love to read, this is the best incentive yet, to start reviewing books.

Image Credit: ElizabethNoyesWrites.com

Image credit: DeborahJayAuthor.com

Check out these links for more information on writing reviews:

Tips for Writing Amazon Reviews

Amazon Community Review Guidelines

So, the next time you are reading a novel, think about leaving a review. Indy authors everywhere will thank you.

I am always looking for reviews of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy. If you’re interested, leave me a reply in the comments section.

ATTENTION AUTHORS & BOOK REVIEWERS

In fact, if you are an author looking for a review, leave a comment with a link to your book. That will enable readers with a way to contact you. HAPPY REVIEWING! ❤

Gotta DASH! Time to write some more reviews!

Writing Speculative Fiction – Guest Post by Craig Boyack…

Craig Boyack shares this thoughts about writing speculative fiction. A must read! ❤

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

I write what I call speculative fiction. Many of the definitions out there never really give a crystal clear idea of what the genres mean, so I picked this name and made my own definition. To me, speculative fiction involves at least one unreal element.

Speculative fiction is a big enough field to keep me happy. It includes paranormal, science fiction, fantasy, urban fantasy, horror, super heroes, and everything similar. I think I’ve dabbled in all of it to one degree or another.

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One of the things I try to do is enough research to make it digestible. I’ve always said, “I don’t have to be perfect, I just have to be plausible.” The plausible parts make it easier for the reader to take that leap of faith when I need them to.

I did an extensive amount of research for my novel, Panama. I set this during the…

View original post 684 more words

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “The Termite Queen: The Wound That Has No Healing, Volume II “ by Author, @TermiteWriter

  • Title:  The Termite Queen, The Wound That Has No Healing, Volume II
  • Author: Lorinda J. Taylor
  • File Size: 1469 KB
  • Print Length: 598 Pages
  • Publisher: Self Published by Author
  • Publication Date: May 18, 2012
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0084NKIR0
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Science Fiction, Literary

*I won a copy of Volume I and II of the Termite Queen in a contest and enjoyed it so much that I am offering an honest review which follows.*

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

“In the Termite Queen: Volume One: The Speaking of the Dead, the death of a specimen of intelligent giant termite impels a team of scientists to mount a new expedition to the alien planet where the specimen was captured. During the voyage out, the linguistic anthropologist Kaitrin Oliva and the expedition’s chief, the entomologist Griffen Gwidian, fall in love and form a union, after which Prf. Gwidian begins to exhibit some troubling changes of mood and behavior. Meanwhile, on the alien planet, civil discord is brewing among the termites; Mo’gri’ta’tu, the Queen’s Chamberlain, hatches a plot to murder the Holy Seer Kwi’ga’ga’tei, a plot foiled only by the sudden reappearance of the Flying Monster.

In Volume Two, the team arrives at the planet to a combative reception, but, aided by Kaitrin’s insights into the termites’ unique language, the “Star-Beings” and the Shshi are soon communicating and learning to know each other. The Shshi accept Kaitrin as a friend and even come to revere her as the Mother of her people. Meanwhile, Griffen’s inexplicable insecurities escalate, while the dastardly Mo’gri’ta’tu continues to foment conspiracies. Ultimately, the two plotlines intersect in an explosive climax, after which the team must return to Earth and try to come to terms with what they have experienced.

MY RECOMMENDATION:

You can find my review of the Termite Queen – The Speaking of the Dead, Volume I, here.

Volume Two of the Termite Queen leads the reader deeper into the workings of the termite civilization of Lo’ro’ra on the planet, 2 Giotta 17 A. At the same time, the relationship between Kaitrin and Professor Griffin Gwidian takes on new dimensions. It’s like getting two separate stories – science fiction/romance intertwined into one huge book. What a bonus!

As Kaitrin and her team delve into the mechanics of the Shshi language, she further discovers the language of the termite is transmitted to humans through a pattern of radio wave frequencies. Katrin’s understanding of the termite tongue deepens, and this leads to many meetings with the Holy Seer or shaman, Kwi’ga’ga’tei where Kaitrin is taught about the culture of the insect society.

The many interactions with the Remembrancer and the worker chiefs reveal a community that is human-like and yet alien. Kaitrin prepares to study the termite race in the most intimate way possible by entering the termite palace beneath the ground. This is my favorite part of the novel where the storyline involving the termite society is revealed.

The author creates a culture that is both, fascinating and believable. The insects behave much like the termite societies on earth but yet appear to be social and much more intelligent. At times, I marveled at how human these creatures seemed.

Not only do the termites have a creation myth, but they also have laws and a caste-like system of behavior. The Queen lives in a room far beneath the ground as her bloated body is not capable of movement other than to bring forth more offspring. There are workers, warriors, and termite alates, those gifted with wings and the ability to create new cities. Everyone has a job to do which ensures the survival of their termite kingdom.

Ms. Taylor employed the skillfully written chapters that dealt with the termite kingdom to read like a play. The termite characters were easier to relate to when presented in this manner.

Moreover, there is so much more to this saga than the termite kingdom. Griffin and Kaitrin’s relationship dominate the story and move it forward. Griffin is older than Kaitrin and has waited many years for his soul mate. Once he has found her, he will do anything to keep her close to his side. In comparison, Kaitrin is consumed with the language and culture of the termite colony. She battles her desire to discover all she can about the creatures versus Griffin’s needs. The tension is palpable in their relationship.

While Kaitrin immerses herself into the termite culture, Griffin can hardly contain his growing anxiety that something will happen to her. The Professor is obsessed with her safety, and dark secrets from a trauma-filled youth roil beneath the surface of his psyche. Kaitrin embarks upon her final visit to the termitarium on the same day that the Chamberlain and his minions launch an attack with the intent to unseat Kwi’ga’ga’tei. Gwidian jumps into the fray determined to save Kaitrin.

The end of the novel is explosive and emotion, and I could not put the book down. I felt as obsessed as Professor Gwidian and read into the wee hours for many nights determined to find out happened next. This story had me hooked, and that is good news because Ms. Taylor has another series that continues the story of the Termite Kingdom.

Image credit: Redbubble.com

I loved the Termite Queen Series and have added it to my “Me Time,” science fiction/fantasy category. If you love science fiction, fantasy, and romance you are going to love this series. I know I did, and I have a book hangover to prove it!

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars



Author, Lorinda J. Taylor

About the Author – Lorinda J. Taylor

I’m a retired librarian who worked in academic libraries as a cataloger, and I live in Colorado Springs, CO.  Besides my MLS, I have a BA and an MA in English, and some work toward a Ph.D.  As a child, I was always making up imaginary worlds, but I didn’t start writing fantasy until I read “Lord of the Rings” in 1969 and discovered that even serious scholars like J.R.R. Tolkien can continue to create such worlds far into their adult lives. I never was successful in getting published in those early days, however, and then family considerations forced me to take a hiatus from writing from 1983 until 2000. Since then, I’ve written a novella and several novels, and have begun to self-publish since I doubt that I can live long enough to go the old-fashioned route!

My interests include almost anything literary, scientific, or speculative — science fiction and fantasy, mythology, language (I write conlangs for my books), poetry, cosmology, astrophysics, anthropology, archaeology, entomology, ornithology …

Philosophically, I call myself a spiritual humanist.

Among my favorite authors are Ursula K. LeGuin, Tolkien (of course), Evangeline Walton, and many poets such as Robert Graves and Dylan Thomas.

Here’s a drawing of one of my favorite creations.  Meet Ki’shto’ba Huge-Head!


Lorinda Taylor also creates her own cover art and illustrations.

WHY BUY TERMITEWRITER PAPERBACKS?

“If you buy a paperback from Amazon, you can get the Kindle version FREE! And the paperback gives you several bonuses, like a full-color cover, plus extra illustrations on the back cover and (for the Ki’shto’ba series and Children of the Music) maps!”

Here is a list of the Termite Queen and The Ki’shto’ba Huge-Head books with links to Amazon:

The Termite Queen (2-volume novel)

v.1: The Speaking of the Dead http://amzn.to/Imh3kd
v.2: The Wound That Has No Healing http://amzn.to/LnvhbL

The Labors of Ki’shto’ba Huge-Head (series: 7 volumes)
v.1: The War of the Stolen Mother http://amzn.to/QO5rPF
v.2: The Storm-Wing http://amzn.to/16PjTxa
v.3: The Valley of Thorns http://amzn.to/16xKzmY
v.4: Beneath the Mountain of Heavy Fear http://amzn.to/1jesQa5
v.5: The Wood Where the Two Moons Shine http://amzn.to/1x7n5nt
v.6: The Revenge of the Dead Enemy http://amzn.to/1nWtuxG
Sequel: The Buried Ship at the End of the World http://amzn.to/2mYr6IC

Here I am, holding the stuffed tiger that my mother sent
to me way back when I was a sophomore in college.
My school’s mascot is a tiger!

Here’s where you can find Lorinda:

Blog – Ruminations of a Remembrancer at http://termitewriter.blogspot.com
(You can find free chapters on her website of Volume I of the Termite Queen).

Twitter – Lorinda J. Taylor @TermiteWriter

Facebook – Lorinda J. Taylor (Termite Writer)

Google+ – Lorinda J Taylor

Thanks for stopping by to meet Lorinda Taylor.

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram


Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 24 – “FIRE & RAIN”

welcome-to-the-tanka-cafe-on-st

Happy TANKA Tuesday everyone! Welcome to the TANKA CAFÉ. Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, order some coffee or tea and let’s write some TANKA poetry.

Grab a cup of Joe or a cup of tea and read what’s below…

SO, LET’S TALK ABOUT HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM.

It’s worth taking a moment to check the best way to create a Tanka.

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

Here are some great sites that will help you write your Tanka.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Tanka. Here are the rules for the Tanka form: howmanysyllables.com

I will publish the Tanka Tuesday prompt at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver Time).  That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR TANKA POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon) Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s Tanka post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s Tanka poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your Tanka.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your Tanka Post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual Tanka’s” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your TANKA

If you add these hashtags to your post your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Tanka Tuesday Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 23rd CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – HELP & SMILE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Two on a Rant/Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge #23 Help & Smile

Rena Saxena/The Last Smile

Tanka: Stirrings – Jane Dougherty Writes

Naa Prapancham, My World/Spring Smiles

The Melting Snow: Smile of the Cabin Owner (Traveler’s Tanka) – Thoughts of Words

tanka “HELP & Smile” – Mick E Talbot Poems EDIT

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Poetry Challenge #23 Help & Smile | Annette Rochelle Aben

Helpful Smile | The Syllabub Sea

Help & Smile | thoughts and entanglements

Tanka – Help & Smile | radhikasreflection

Tanka Tuesday//Colleen’s weekly//poetry challenge  23 Help & Smile. – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Joy | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Cookie Crumb Lips – A #Tanka – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly Tanka Challenge: Help and Smile | The Dragon’s Lair

Colleen’s Weekly #Tanka #Poetry Challenge # 23 – HELP & SMILE | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Deepikas Ramblings/Tanka – Help & Smile

Loki (a tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams EDIT

Tanka – Help/Smile | Willow Poetry EDIT

Smile | method two madness

Crone Chronicler/Tanka Challenge #23 – Help and Smile: Belle Vs. Rehab

This week’s Poet of the Week is Marie, from her blog, The Syllabub Sea. Her Tanka poem was inspired by Lewis Carroll and captures the Cheshire Cat in all his glory.

Notice how the first three lines form a picture in your mind. Marie’s last two lines are her observations. Perfect!

Helpful Cheshire cat

Guides lost travellers with an

Inscrutable grin.

But when Wonderland dissolves

The elusive cat retires.

© 2017 The Syllabub Sea

~**~

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: FIRE & RAIN

(Remember you can use any forms of the words, AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a Tanka based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

TANKA TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

Sign up for my monthly newsletter where you will find interesting reads from across the web plus a few creations of my own. Written, just for you, with fairy love and mindfulness, each month. Just fly over to my SIGN UP PAGE and enter your email. ❤

CONNECT WITH ME – I love hearing from you!

Amindfuljourneysite.wordpress.com  Amazon  Twitter  Facebook  Google+  Instagram

How To Optimize your Facebook Author Page to Sell Books – Written Word Media

 

great

This article breaks down step by step how to set up your Facebook author page to sell your books. I just completed the process and am happy to share that you can now buy my book from my author page. Check it out: https://www.facebook.com/CMChesebro/. Click the shop now button and it takes you to the Amazon link. ❤

Facebook was the most popular social media platform in 2016. Take advantage of its large audience by optimizing your Facebook author page to sell books.

Source: How To Optimize your Facebook Author Page to Sell Books – Written Word Media

20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers

There are some amazing Pinterest boards listed in this post. Check it out. ❤

Find out how the visual platform can inspire, teach, tempt and entertain writers.

Source: 20 Inspiring Pinterest Boards for Writers

Cookie Crumb Lips – A #Tanka

Welcome to my contribution to my weekly #Tanka Tuesday poetry challenge. This week, I tweaked the prompt word of “help” to “balm,” and I changed “smile” to “smirk.”

Both words have many connotations. Depending on how you use your synonyms you can alter the meaning of your Tanka poetry in many ways. Don’t be afraid to experiment with synonyms. Sometimes subtle meanings pack the most punch in your poetry. Play with the words for different reactions.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: BrainyQuote.com

Please link your #Tanka Poem contribution to my post found here.

Seeking redemption –
his smirk encircles my heart,
with cookie crumb lips.
My Grandchildren are a balm
which appease my failing heart.

©2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

A photo of my grandson when he was a wee boy. Today he plays football in junior high school. Where does the time go?

Use these hashtags to tag your post and to Tweet each other’s poems#Tanka Tuesday, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Tanka, #poem

Go on Twitter and search for these hashtags. There are tons of great poems to read and retweet.”

Don’t forget to join in and share your #Tanka #Poem using the words: SMILE & CHANGE, or if you need some visual inspiration write your Tanka poem and tell us of the feelings and descriptions from the photo below:


SPREAD THAT LOVE & JOY ALL OVER THE PLACE!

READ MORE ON COLLEEN’S FAIRY WHISPERS

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Most Common Writing Mistakes, Pt. 56: Unfulfilled Foreshadowing – Helping Writers Become Authors

For new writers, foreshadowing is essential to moving your story forward. Without it, your story falls flat. K.M. Weiland is one of my favorite authors to follow because the guidance she gives is spot on. Read more by clicking the link below. ❤

Learn the three ways you can go wrong with unfulfilled foreshadowing, as well as five ways to avoid accidentally creating it in the first place.

Source: Most Common Writing Mistakes, Pt. 56: Unfulfilled Foreshadowing – Helping Writers Become Authors