#Colorado Dreams – A #Haibun

Welcome to my contribution to my Weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of past & future.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.

Image credit: GeniusQuotes.net

The meadow fairy hovered in the crisp air. Her wings beat the air in a slow rhythm – transparent, barely discernable in the evening light. Her body was long and lean much like the tall grasses she hid in. Her blue eyes captured my attention. In an instant, I knew she was a Meliae fairy nymph. Each of the seven nymph clans was represented by a color from the rainbow which manifested in the pigmentation of their eyes. With that realization, I knew something magical had possessed me.

Colorado dreams –
blending my future and past,
whispers of our fate.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

I found this picture on Facebook. This is the starting point for what my meadow fairy will look like.

See you June 6th! ❤

GUESS WHAT? I’VE BEEN NOMINATED AS THE BEST PAL BLOG OF 2017, BY THE ANNUAL BLOGGER’S BASH. HAVE YOU VOTED? CLICK HERE TO VOTE NOW. THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT. ❤

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “Behind the Door,” by Author, P. C. Zick

  • Title: Behind the Door, Book 4 in the Behind the Love Series
  • Amazon Author Page: P. C. Zick
  • File Size: 2535 KB
  • Print Length: 167 Pages
  • Publisher: Self-published by the author
  • Publication Date: May 16, 2017
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B06XK79QZK
  • ISBN-10: 1545593647
  • ISBN-13: 978-1545593646
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Women’s Fiction, Literature, Military Fiction, Romance

*I was given an advanced reader’s copy of this book by the author for review purposes*

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

A VOLUPTUOUS WOMAN UNLUCKY IN LOVE. A WOUNDED PSYCHOLOGIST ON A MISSION. AN UNDENIABLE ATTRACTION WITH AN ETHICAL DILEMMA.

Sally Jean Compton is in love. And this time it’s with a man who isn’t in love with someone else. Dr. Brett Gorman arrives in Victory to help the veterans of Deer River with PTSD symptoms. When tragedy strikes, neither Sally Jean nor Brett are prepared for what happens next.

The shocking aftermath of the terror of PTSD untreated leaves the entire town of Victory reeling. But none are more affected than Sally Jean and Brett who must deal with their own pasts and the trauma left behind.

When Sally Jean seeks out the expertise of Dr. Brett, the psychologist of the river folks, they discover an intense attraction that leads them both to learn about themselves.

But before anything happens, Sally Jean must learn she deserves to be loved, and Brett must forgive himself for the death of his friend and his sister, his wife. It’s a rocky journey to love.

Behind the Door is the fourth novel in the Behind the Love contemporary romance series that features sizzling attractions, dramatic confrontations, and intertwined and complicated lives. Set in the fictional small town of Victory, Florida, friends fight and love and form families of their own choosing.

BUY BEHIND THE DOOR TO START READING ABOUT IRRESISTIBLE CHARACTERS FILLED WITH PASSION.

MY RECOMMENDATION:

Love has found Sally Jean Compton and James Luther once and for all. Head over heels for each other, the two plan their life with an eye toward marriage. Sally Jean couldn’t be happier. James has finally found meaning in his life. Life is the sweetest it could be for two people in love.

Until that day. In the blink of an eye, the couple’s future is changed forever. Sally Jean is devastated as she tries to reason out the turn her life has taken. Thank goodness for her friends who help her cope.

Leah, from Soup’s On (featured in book one), asks Dr. Brett Gorman, a psychologist with a specialty in PTSD to help the veterans deal with the situation. The town of Victory, Florida will never be the same. The doctor agrees, and when he meets Sally Jean, he struggles to keep his composure under control. He is clearly smitten with her. Never has he felt such a connection before. With Sally Jean, Brett Gorman feels alive.

Unfortunately, Sally Jean has her own issues. When her past rises up to suck her down into the morass once again, Dr. Brett is there to help her muddle through. However, Sally Jean doesn’t see their relationship as anything more than great sex. Will Dr. Brett be able to help Sally Jean gain the self-confidence she needs to be part of a loving relationship?

Behind the Door, is the last book in the Behind the Love series. Don’t worry, each novel stands alone. The characters do overlap from novel to novel, giving the reader the chance to get to know them in different situations. That is one of my favorite things about the author. P.C. Zick creates characters that remind you of your friends or maybe even yourself in similar circumstances. There is always someone you can relate to.

I have read so many romance novels that I have lost count of them all. Most of them blend together with predictable plots. Yet, these books have been different. I have loved this series from start to finish. In fact, I haven’t read the third book and will now backtrack to complete my journey to Victory, Florida. The characters have stuck in my heart, and they are like visiting old friends.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars



Author, P. C. Zick

About the Author

Bestselling author P.C. Zick describes herself as a storyteller no matter what she writes. And she writes in a variety of genres, including romance, contemporary fiction, and nonfiction. She’s won various awards for her essays, columns, editorials, articles, and fiction.

The three novels in her Florida Fiction Series contain stories of Florida and its people and environment, which she credits as giving her a rich base for her storytelling. “Florida’s quirky and abundant wildlife—both human and animal—supply my fiction with tales almost too weird to be believable.”

Her contemporary romances in the Behind the Love series are also set in Florida. The novels in her most recent series, Smoky Mountain Romances, are set in in Murphy, North Carolina. She is currently working on a new romance series, Rivals in Love. Join the Crandall family of Chicago as the siblings find love despite their focus on successful careers. All of her books are stand-alone reads, even if they appear in a series.

Her novels contain elements of romance with strong female characters, handsome heroes, and descriptive settings. She believes in living lightly upon this earth with love, laughter, and passion, and through her fiction, she imparts this philosophy in an entertaining manner with an obvious love for her characters, plot, and themes.

Links:

Behind the Altar – https://www.amazon.com/Behind-Altar-Love-Book-ebook/dp/B00N2WPFD0

Behind the Bar – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V41FL26

Behind the Curtain – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015JTHQ5I

Behind the Door – https://www.amazon.com/Behind-Door-Love-Book-ebook/dp/B06XK79QZK

Subscribe to P. C. Zick’s Newsletter and never miss a thing! – http://bit.ly/2neozgi

Amazon Author Central

Website: pczick.com

Blog: Living Lightly pczick.wordpress.com

Facebook Fan Page

Follow on Twitter: @PCZick


P.C. Zick is also an editor. Her services include editing, proofreading, formatting, coaching, and consultation on publishing. Please visit her website, The Manuscript Doctor, to find out more about her services and rates.

Do you want to know more about the series and P.C. Zick’s writing journey? Click to read, “Revisioning Into Romance, by P. C. Zick.” 

Thanks for stopping by to meet P.C. Zick.  I’ll see you in the next review – after I finish reading this new book…



Marje shares her thoughts and experiences in the form of a Haibun to the Manchester, UK terror attack yesterday. I was deeply moved by her words and my love and prayers go out to the people affected by this tragedy. ❤

K Y R O S M A G I C A

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I had a disturbed sleep last night waking up at 5am. I managed to get back to sleep and awoke again at 7am. I checked my twitter feed  and discovered the horrifying news about the terrorist attack in Manchester. I cried. I couldn’t cope with the sad news about another attack especially one which struck at our young people. This is cruel, beyond comprehension.  I contemplated the morning and realised how beautiful a day it was. A single bird remained atop a tree, not moving so I picked up my mobile phone and captured it. Seconds later it flew away. If only those young people could have flown away. If only that man hadn’t done what he did.

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How ironic. The sun shone, but how could this be? How are we to continue when such atrocities happen? I suppose the answer is we have no choice; we have to, or the terrorists will…

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Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 35 – PAST & FUTURE by Marjorie Mallon of Kyrosmagica

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 35 – PAST & FUTURE

A new badge for spring

THERE WILL BE NO POETRY CHALLENGE NEXT TUESDAY, MAY 30TH. I WILL BE ON VACATION IN THE MOUNTAINS OF UTAH WITH NO WIFI! The next challenge will be on Tuesday, June 6th.

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

Image credit: BrainyQuote.com

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

Are you new to writing the Haiku in English poetry form? Please read my page, How to Write a Haiku in English.

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click HERE to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 34th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – Power & Allure: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE – Ladyleemanila

The Trappings – Reena Saxena

How I look at it – Reena Saxena

Sun power – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleens weekly #poetry #challenge : power & allure tanka | Two on a Rant

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE – Mick E Talbot Poems

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #34 Power & Allure | Annette Rochelle Aben

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #34 Power & Allure

A New Poetry Challenge – [135/365] – Rambling Kori

questions unanswered | rivrvlogr

Power & Allure | thoughts and entanglements

Power (haiku #16) – Stories

Everything You Need (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Colleen’s Poetry Challenge – 34 – The Bag Lady

Power & Allure – A Haiku/Nosaintaugustine

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #34 Power & Allure (Tanka)/Stuff & What If

Tanka – Power & Allure | radhikasreflection

SIMPLE PLEASURES | Sweet aroma

Stooping to conquer – Playing with words

A Haiku Micro-anthology: Dew – Mick E Talbot Poems

Self | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

“The Return” – A Haibun – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Haibun: My dream to fly – My Feelings My Freedom

Lunar Rays | method two madness

Echoes from the Before Time: Haibun | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

This week’s Poet of the Week is Rugby 483, from her blog called, The Bag Lady. She wrote a haiku that hit the spot for me. The brevity of the words she chose told the story. Here’s what I loved about it:

Close your eyes after you have read the Haiku. Can you see your version of the woman standing there projecting absolute power in her beauty and allure? That is what a Haiku does for me. It captures a moment in time and flashes a quick image in my mind.

She was unaware

Of her absolute allure

Giving her power

© 2017 Rugby483, The Bag Lady

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: PAST & FUTURE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

GUESS WHAT? I’VE BEEN NOMINATED AS THE BEST PAL BLOG OF 2017, BY THE ANNUAL BLOGGER’S BASH. HAVE YOU VOTED? CLICK HERE TO VOTE NOW. THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT. ❤

Smorgasbord Poetry – Which Cake? by Robbie Cheadle

Robbie, from Robbie’s Inspiration, is so clever. Check out her poetry and her cakes! ❤

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Today Robbie Cheadle ponders the question about what cake to bake for her husband and his impending birthday. There is already so much baking going on in the Cheadle household that coming up with something special to surprise him is going to be a challenge.

Which cake?

My hubby’s birthday is coming
I must make him a cake,
It really hard to decide,
Which one I should bake.

Should it be chocolate
Decorated with cherries,
Or a meringue tower
With cream and wild berries.

A gingerbread house,
Covered in bright sweets,
A selection of pastries,
Filled with sweetmeats.

Something quite tart,
Like lemon and lime.
Or a baked cheesecake,
With tastes quite sublime.

Something quite simple,
Like scones, jam and cream.
Or a yummy treacle pudding,
Cooked in a basin, over steam.

So many delicious choices,
What would he like best?
I’ll conjure up a surprise,
And put it to…

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Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “My Life at Sweetbrier: A Life Changed by Horses “ by Author, Deanie Humphrys-Dunne

  • Title:  My Life at Sweetbrier: A Life Changed by Horses
  • Author: Deanie Humphrys-Dunne
  • File Size: 1264 KB
  • Print Length:  142 Pages
  • Publisher: Monday Creek Publishing
  • Publication Date: May 12, 2017
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0711P67DM
  • ISBN-10: 069287898X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0692878989
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Children’s literature, Autobiographical

    *I was given an advanced reader’s copy of this book by the author for review purposes*

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IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

What if you grew up on a horse farm and your single passion was to become a champion horseback rider? The problem is, you were born with a disability. Doctors tell your parents you’ll never walk, let alone ride. What will happen next? What does her dad do that changes her life? Will a failed racehorse and a handicapped girl become a winning team? This is the author’s true story of her journey. Even if Deanie prevails, will she find exactly the right horse to help her win?

MY RECOMMENDATION:

Do you love horses and stories filled with courage and inspiration? Young, Deanie Humphreys was born a preemie with the debilitating disease called cerebral palsy. At birth, a portion of her brain was damaged. The result was that Deanie had difficulty walking. Now, for most kids, this would be enough to limit their physical activities for life. But Deanie’s father made a huge decision that changed her life. He said, “I’m going to teach you to ride, and you’ll be fine.”

That single decision changed Deanie’s life forever. Deanie took her first steps at four years old. With the grit and determination of someone much older than herself, she set out to prove the doctors wrong. And, let me tell you. Deanie’s journey is filled with the hopes and joys that only reaching for your dreams and succeeding can bring. It was the ability to ride a horse that gave Deanie the freedom and normality she craved.

My Life at Sweetbrier: A Life Changed by Horses, is Deanie’s story based on memories and photos from her childhood. The book is written for children of all ages and filled with the kind of stories that everyone can easily relate to. The underlying theme is clear – perseverance pays off – never give up on your dreams.

I laughed and cried with the young Deanie, and I felt her pain at not being like the other kids. This is the kind of book you want to read and discuss with your children, talking about empathy for those who are different; while at the same time, encouraging children to not just accept their lot in life. The author writes:

“…it is wise to use your challenges to motivate you toward your goals because when you’ve conquered one obstacle, you’ve gained the confidence to tackle your next challenge.”

Also, at the back of the book, the author provides a quiz for the reader to pull from their memory the finer points of the story. Answers are provided giving an additional learning opportunity.

I loved this sweet story of courage in the face of adversity. It was a poignant story of perseverance and motivation to never give up on your dreams. Deanie Humphrys-Dunne is a real champion and motivator. Her journey will inspire you to reach for the stars.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars



Author, Deanie Humphreys-Dunne, and Peach: Reserve Champions, Mrs. Foster’s Farm Photo Courtesy of Bob Moseder Photography

About the Author

Deanie Humphrys-Dunne is an award-winning children’s author who loves writing captivating books that teach children life lessons. She has 5 books published: Tails of Sweetbrier, Charlie the Horse, Charlene the Star, Charlene the Star and Hattie’s Heroes, and Charlene the Star and Bentley Bulldog.

My tales of Sweetbrier details Deanie’s childhood on a horse farm. What if your one desire was to become a champion equestrian? But your parents were told you’d never walk. What happens next? This true story will inspire your child to never give up on his/her dreams.

Deanie’s other books are told by the farm animals. They’re humorous stories you child will love. Recently, Deanie was featured on a WTNH.Com/CTStyle television program.

Please stop by Deanie’s new website:www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com. You’ll find inspiring stories about real-life children there!

Awards for Tails of Sweetbrier:
CLIPPA finalist (2014)
Feathered Quill Book Awards silver medal (2014)
Purple Dragonfly Book Award: (2015)
Reader’s Favorite Silver Medal: (2016)
Author Award from the Authorsshow.com (2015)

Here’s where you can find Deanie:

Blog: http://www.childrensbookswithlifelessons.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeanieHDunne/

https://www.facebook.com/Memories-of-Sweetbrier-Farm-Easton-CT-1736497933252082/

Twitter: @DeanieHDunne

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deanie-humphrys-dunne-682a5322/

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/deaniedunne/?eq=Dean&etslf=6351

Thanks for stopping by to meet Deanie ❤


Couch Convos – Colleen Chesebro

I had the privilege of visiting Lisa today on her monthly feature: Couch Convos. I loved her questions. Please stop by and say hello. ❤

Rebirth of Lisa

couch convos (1)

Part I

LWT: Welcome to Couch Convos! Let’s get started. How did you get the idea to write about the swamp fairy?

CC:Thanks, Lisa. I’m happy to be here with you. I love this big comfy couch. Now hang on, because I am going to tell you how I met a real life fairy!

While on a walk during a warm, foggy morning in November 2014, I had a close encounter of the fairy kind. At the time, we were living in Pensacola, Florida. I still remember the day, as if it has been carved into my memory; something I will never forget.

Road I took on my walk ©Colleen Chesebro used with permission

As I walked along the road, I heard a sound that instantly caught my attention. At first, I considered the possibility that the sound might be an injured bird rustling in the thick underbrush. I peered into the foliage and drew…

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“The Return” – A Haibun

New Badge! Made on Canva.com

Welcome to my contribution to my Weekly #Poetry Challenge, where you can write your own Haiku, Tanka, or Haibun using the prompt words of power & allure.

The best poetry has layers of meaning.


Image credit: Pinterest – Quotes about Poetry

I used ‘beguiles’ for allure, and I kept the word power. Remember, synonyms are encouraged.

“The Return”


The heat from the noonday sun reflected off the low water filling the Arroyo. The glare blinded me, and I raised my hand to shield my eyes from the strength of the brilliant light. I step closer to the edge of the gully careful not to slip on the wet pebbles. Towering cottonwood trees with trunks twisted by the prairie winds, cluster near the bend of the creek. Leaves rustle in the gentle breeze. A sound catches my attention, and I glance over my shoulder.

There, perched on a boulder, is a lark bunting. The bird stares at me, and I stare back, bewitched by the blue-black color of its body and wings. I experience an uncanny feeling of déjà vu, and my heart beats in a quick staccato rhythm. The realization floods my senses, and I feel faint. Precious lark bunting, I knew you in another place and time.

Haunting memories –
bound by the power of love
‘tween mother and child.
The meadow fairy beguiles
as a new challenge awaits.

My calcite pendant recognizes you, too. It explodes by flashing a kaleidoscope of rainbow colors across the sky. My heart bursts with love and tears stream down my face. I remember you. I held you close inside my heart hoping to see you again.

© 2017 Colleen M. Chesebro

See you next week!

The Quick+Easy Way to Learn to Write Fiction: Dive into the 30-Day Short Story Challenge — RACHEL GIESEL

If you want to learn to write fiction, there are a LOT of things you need to know about. But trying to learn them all while writing a novel can be time-consuming and frustrating. Learn to write fiction the quick and easy way by focusing on the short story. The short form is the standard vehicle for teaching fiction in schools around the world, but it's time to learn the short story form on your time from the comfort of your own home. In the 30-day short story challenge, we'll read stories and we'll write stories. I've got your plan to get started (and a bunch of stories you should read right now)! Click through to read the whole post!

I really enjoyed this post and follow Rachel by email. Check out her post below and the short story challenge. ❤

via The Quick+Easy Way to Learn to Write Fiction: Dive into the 30-Day Short Story Challenge — RACHEL GIESEL

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “A Blend of Tea Break Tales, Vol I” by David Ellis & the Tunbridge Wells & Kent District Writer’s Circle Members

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

A collection of Short Stories written by writers in the South East of England. A variety of genres collides in this eclectic collection that serves up lashing of warmth, wit and talented writing from a diverse group of individuals.

All proceeds from this collection will be donated to local, national, and international children’s literacy charities.

This book is a compilation of short stories (two of which I contributed under the name of Angela McPherson). They originally appeared in a local newspaper, and have now been put together to sell in aid of children’s literacy charities. I would like to pay tribute to my colleagues in the Tunbridge Wells & District Writers’ Circle under whose auspices this achievement came about.

Foreward (by Karen Rollason)
The idea for this particular Short Story Anthology was inspired following the publication of Tea Break Tales in The Kent and Sussex Courier newspaper. Our weekly column showcased stories written by Circle members. This really was a wonderful opportunity, for both the individual members and the Circle as a whole by raising our profile within the community.

MY RECOMMENDATION:

Recently, I stumbled across a British collection of stories I couldn’t wait to read. I was familiar with David Ellis and his poetry, so I knew there had to be magic waiting for me inside these pages. Besides, all the proceeds from the book are donated to local, national, and international children’s literacy charities. How could I go wrong with that?

The stories range from flash fiction to short stories spanning a number of genres. Some of the fiction was more contemporary and dealt with the rigors of raising children, growing old, and the fragility and renewal of the human spirit. Many of these tales touched my heart, while others had me laughing out loud.

One story stands out in particular and is called, “Isn’t Death Grand,” by Linda Smith. Sally, an overweight and overworked nurse, meets her maker in an unusual way. Sally’s past and present collide in a surprising sequence of events that aligns her destiny with that of her coma patient. Believe me… this is a story you won’t want to miss.

This collection of stories was a quick read, and I read a few stories each night. The writing was entertaining and engaging. This book would make the perfect companion for a vacation spent relaxing in the sun, or for a snowy afternoon cuddled under a mound of blankets. I know it would make the perfect gift for the bookworms in your life.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars



Author, David Ellis

About the Author

I am an award-winning poet and author of poetry, fiction, and music lyrics. My weapon of choice is humour and I use it as often as possible, as it gets me out of trouble. Think of me like the thriller genre in that I am fast paced, relentless and impossible to put down! I reside in Tunbridge Wells, Kent in the UK.

Once upon a time, there was a writer who ate a little bit too much food one day, and he felt tired. On this fateful day, he happened to make a comment in passing to his brother about being a bit stuffed and from this innocent conversation came the birth of the legend that is TooFullToWrite! And no, I am not overweight but I do have a passion for food!

I am a 37-year-old male, a writer, podcaster, lyricist, humorist, novelist/author and poet who lives in Tunbridge Wells, England (yes, I am in Blighty but don’t let that put you off, I am really a very friendly chap).

I like/love an absolute truckload of things – I coin the term for myself entertainment junkie – films, music, books, TV series, computer games, etc. So rather than bore you by listing them all here, feel free to chat to me about stuff on FaceBook, Twitter or the chat of your choice!

I appreciate all of your support, your comments mean the world to me. Thanks for stopping by and don’t forget to write! Want to know more about me? Well, you could try reading this too and see where it gets you! The (Mostly) True Origin Story of TooFullToWrite

Still, want to know more? Well, I wrote this article over at Hastywords blog, so you can always take a look at this. It’s about choosing love over fear and features animals #BeReal With David Ellis

Here is more about the Tunbridge Wells & Kent District Writer’s Circle and an excerpt from Francois Keyser’s interview:

A Blend of Tea Break Tales is also a collection of short stories from a band of authors that belong to my local Writers’ Circle. I donated one of my stories (which crops up in “A Little Bit of What You Fancy”) for the collection, and I collated all of the stories from the authors. There is a lot of diversity in the tales of this particular book, they are mostly all contemporary modern day fables laced with humour, romance, and poignancy, with a couple of historical pieces also thrown into the mix.

You are donating all the proceeds from “A Blend of Tea Break Tales” to children’s literacy programs locally and internationally. What inspired your decision to support children’s literacy programs? How can we as parents and teachers encourage literacy in children?

This was a joint decision from all of the authors who participated in the collection. Rather than deal with the nightmare of trying to pay out separate royalties to all of the authors, we thought of the very endearing idea to donate all profits to support children’s literacy programs. All of the people that I have associated with are extremely generous, this is their way of giving to something that is of massive benefit to us all in the long run, for if we encourage our children to read well, then they will be better educated and better off all round because of this.

As parents and teachers, I would advocate in making reading as fun as possible for children and try to encourage them to pick up a book instead of mindless internet surfing or playing of handheld videogames. Don’t get me wrong, I would never want to deny children the chance to play with such devices, but perhaps they should earn their time on them by reading first!”

Here’s where else you can find David Ellis:

Blog: My website https://toofulltowrite.com contains Creativity Advice for budding novelists and writers.

Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/TooFullToWrite

Twitter: David Ellis @TooFullToWrite
https://twitter.com/TooFullToWrite

Thanks for stopping by to meet David. ❤


Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 34 – POWER & ALLURE

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

Image credit: Pinterest – Mother Nature Quotes

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

Are you new to writing the Haiku in English poetry form? Please read my page, How to Write a Haiku in English.

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 33rd POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – CLEAN & SHARP: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Uncluttered – Reena Saxena

Elevation – Reena Saxena

Hunters – Jane Dougherty Writes

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP – Ladyleemanila

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP – Mick E Talbot Poems

Tanka on haiku – questioning the rules of beauty | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP | K Y R O S M A G I C 

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #TANKA #POETRY CHALLENGE # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP/Two on a Rant

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #33 Clean & Sharp | Annette Rochelle Aben

Sepiosexual – Playing with words

Hunter and Prey (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

Artista (haiku #14) – Stories

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge | willowdot21

Clean & Sharp | thoughts and entanglements

The Letter | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Clean & Sharp | The Syllabub Sea

Firebird | method two madness

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP #haiku @ColleenChesebro | Rambling Lisa’s Book Reviews

Tanka: Supremacy – My Feelings My Freedom

This week’s Poet of the Week is Merril from her blog called, Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings. Merril has been writing Haibun that reads like a dramatic short story. The Letter is an excellent example of a Haibun. Here’s what I loved about it:

  1. The prose at the beginning tells a story. It is a snapshot in time as the woman reads the letter and deals with the emotions it evokes within her. It is an emotional read.
  2. The haiku at the end is haunting. You feel the death of the man lost at sea – he is the ghost drifting in the moonlight. Nice!

The Letter

I open the letter, read the words again and again. But they don’t change. They recount the battle and your acts of bravery. They describe the sudden storm, a tempest that battered your ship against the rocks, as you were journeying home to me. I had warned you not to go. I told you of my dream, where the storm clouds gathered and flew like demons, covering the moon, and you appeared beside me, cold and still, dripping, smelling of the sea, smelling of decay. I felt the pain then, clean and sharp in my breast. You laughed at my fears, called me Cassandra. Perhaps I am, for you did not believe me. I look at the ring on my finger and think of this other love-pledge you have given me, feel him flutter-kick in my womb. A son. He’ll be born in the spring. I will tell him about you.

ghosts drift in moonlight

clouds obscure the pale glowing

drops like silver tears

Johannes Vermeer, “Woman in Blue Reading a Letter,” [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

© 2017 Merril, Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: POWER & ALLURE

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

 POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

HSCSF ad with haiku

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “Glimpses,” by Author, @HughRoberts05

*I was given a gift copy of this book by the author*

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

After publishing some of his short stories on his blog, Hugh W. Roberts, who suffers from dyslexia, received numerous requests to publish his short stories in a book.

Here, at last, are 28 short stories that will take your mind on a rollercoaster of a ride into worlds that conceal unexpected twists and turns.

‘Glimpses’ allows the reader a peek into the lives of everyday people who are about to have life lead them on an unpredicted path. From a mysterious deadly iPad app, to a hole in the fence that is not all it seems, to a strange lipstick that appears to have a life of its own, you will encounter terror, laughter, sadness, shock and many other emotions on journeys which promise a thrilling and gripping climax.

If you are a lover of shows such as ‘The Twilight Zone’ and ‘Tales Of The Unexpected,’ then you’re in for a real treat with this first collection of short stories from Hugh.

Dare you take a glimpse into the lives of these unsuspecting characters?

MY RECOMMENDATION:

I was excited to begin reading Glimpses because recently, I have found a new love for short stories – especially written by a British author. I lived in England for a few years back in the early 1980’s, and I think my love of the country and people is rekindled by these stories. I could quickly read a few stories each night which fit my schedule perfectly. The author writes in numerous genres which I also found to be a pleasant surprise.

Glimpses literally gives the reader a brief look into the lives of everyday individuals who experience anything but the ordinary. Each story leads you into a different situation with different characters. Although, there is a four-part murder mystery included that I found to be an extraordinary read. I almost fell out of bed with the final reveal in the serial!

One of my favorite stories was The Last Train to Aldwych, where Grace Simmons meets the same ghost every year on the same date on the London Underground. I shivered in delight anticipating how the story would be told. Instead, I found a surprise ending that left me excited to read more. In fact, each tale had a twist or surprise which made for a satisfying read.

A couple of the stories evoked scary memories of Rod Serling and the Twilight Zone, a show I had watched as a teenager. Don’t be surprised if you don’t hear the haunting melody of the introduction music playing in your mind as you read. I know, I did!

I enjoyed this collection of short stories and if you love your fiction filled with a hint of suspense along with some “shock and awe,” Glimpses is the book for you.

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars



Author, Hugh W. Roberts, and Toby

About the Author

Hugh W. Roberts was born in Wales and returned to his homeland in 2016. Having lived in various parts of the UK, he spent twenty-seven years living and working in London, a city he loves very much. He’s also lived in Chepstow, in south east Wales, Hartlepool, in the north east of England, and Brighton and Hove, on the south coast of the UK.

Despite the fact that he has dyslexia, Hugh was thrilled when he passed both his English Language and English Literature exams at school. He had always enjoyed writing, especially short stories, and was only persuaded to start publishing his work when he was introduced to blogging in February 2014. This was the catalyst that propelled him to fulfill one of his lifetime ambitions of writing and publishing a book.

Still a very keen blogger, Hugh has built up a large following on his blog made up of family, friends, authors, and people from all over the world. He writes about everyday life, publishes some of his photography, and has even dabbled in writing poetry (one of the writing elements he finds difficult to do).

Now living between the town of Abergavenny and the city of Swansea, Hugh shares his life with his civil partner, John, and their Cardigan Welsh Corgi, Toby. He spends his days writing, reading, walking, cycling and likes to relax in front of the television with a glass of red wine. He’s always been a morning person and does most of his writing during the day.

Hugh has already begun writing short stories for his next book, which he hopes to publish towards the end of 2017. In the meantime, he would really appreciate it if you would consider leaving a review on Amazon for this, his first short story collection.

Here’s where you can find Hugh:

Blog: https://hughsviewsandnews.com

Google+: Hugh W. Roberts https://plus.google.com/108647661887874692677

Twitter: @HughRoberts05

Thanks for stopping by to hear about Hugh’s book, Glimpses. ❤


Haiku Friday+ – Fairy Whisperer

My dear friend, Vashti Vega featured me on her blog today. AND, she wrote a fairy Haiku! Many thanks, for making my Friday so special. ❤

The Writer Next Door

Hello everyone and welcome to The Writer Next Door!

I’m excited because I have a very special guest today, Colleen Chesebro the Fairy Whispererherself! It has been a great honor and pleasure knowing this sweet lady for the last couple of years. Colleen is a talented author and poet and a great supporter of her fellow writers, poets and bloggers. She is a veteran of the U. S. Air Force and a retired bookkeeper. She holds an Associate Degree in Business Administration, and another Associate Degree in the Arts, which she uses to blend her love of writing with her passion for all things creative. Her first book, The Swamp Fairy is the first installment of her series The Heart Stone Chronicles.

Amazon-author-The Writer Next Door-Poetry-Haiku_Friday-fairy-guest blogger-Vashti Q

You can get a free preview of The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairyhere.

The Writer Next Door-fairy-VashtiQ-Poetry-Colleen Chesebro-The Swamp Fairy-haiku-book Available on Amazon

In Colleen’s words . . . 

My name is Colleen…

View original post 280 more words

Colleen’s #Book #Reviews – “Fireflies” by Author P. S. Bartlett, @PSBartlett

  • Title: Fireflies
  • Amazon Author Page: P. S. Bartlett
  • File Size: 789 KB
  • Print Length:  324 Pages
  • Publisher: Self Published
  • Publication Date: September 2, 2015
  • Sold By: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN:  B014UAKSIE
  • Formats: Paperback and Kindle
  • Goodreads
  • Genres: Fantasy, Paranormal & Urban, Irish, Historical Fiction, Literature & Fiction

IN THE AUTHOR’S WORDS:

“Dr. Owen Whelan and his wife Sarah have seven bright and expressive children. However, one of them is very unique; he’s been followed since birth by lost souls.
However peculiar Ennis Whelan has been for the first six years of his life, not until the day he found the bird did the degree of his strangeness become so tangible.
Ennis claimed it flew away.

His sister Teagan was about to bury it.

Teagan becomes increasingly suspicious of his odd behavior, but their mother dismisses her claims; that is until he starts healing people.

When he also reveals the gift of sight, he questions his father about visions of his past, including his voyage to America in 1844. Owen prayed he’d never have to share those tragic memories, but he will share them when he realizes he has no choice. Ennis’ life depends on it.”

MY RECOMMENDATION:

I purchased this book last summer where it sat in my Kindle unread for months until I caught up with my to be read pile. After reading the first chapter, I was hooked on the Whelan family.

The story begins in Pennsylvania in the late 1880’s. The Whelan’s are Irish immigrants raising their family of seven children in what appears to be a typical setting for that era. The older children have come of age and are ready to leave the family nest.

Everything within this family seems normal until you meet six year old, Ennis, who the author, P. S. Bartlett, must have created and written with divine guidance. You immediately sense the child has an otherworldly quality about him. It is when the boy finds an injured bird and heals it that you begin to understand that something marvelous is waiting for you inside this book.

Ennis’ oldest sister, Teagan, is the next to receive his healing energy when she cuts herself with a knife while washing dishes. With her life teetering on edge, Ennis heals her too. From then on, I realized the boy was a crystal star child, highly sensitive and psychic, with a primary life purpose.

As the story unfolds, Ennis and Teagan find themselves caught up in the reality of his gifts. They explain to their parents how Ennis has been employing his healing skills. The parents consult with the local pastor and come to the understanding that these miracles are truly heaven sent.

The parents have their own stories unfolding through flashbacks of their previous lives in Ireland and their journey to their new home in America. Be prepared to go on an emotional rollercoaster as their narratives unfold leading the reader to an explosive and startling ending.

I will hold the image of fireflies dancing around a small boy in my heart for a long time.

If you believe in the power of love this book will restore your belief in miracles. I loved this story and am sorry I waited so long to read it. I have read many of P. S. Bartlett’s books, and this one really captured my heart. I’ve added “Fireflies” to my Me-Time paranormal fantasy category. This is one of those books whose message will stay with you!

MY RATING:

Character Believability: 5
Flow and Pace: 5
Reader Engagement: 5
Reader Enrichment: 5
Reader Enjoyment: 5
Overall Rate: 5 out of 5 stars



Author, P. S. Bartlett

About the Author

Award winning author, P.S. Bartlett, was born on Valentine’s Day many moons ago in South Baltimore, Maryland, less than a mile from Fort McHenry and Federal Hill.

Her first novel, “Fireflies,” was published with GMTA Publishing in 2013 and the prequel to “Fireflies,” entitled “Hope From the Ocean,” was published in March of 2014. She loves history and historical fiction. She gets her history fix via movies, television and of course, books although she enjoys reading almost every genre.

Her motto is: “I’m taking a fantastic voyage. Won’t you join me?”

Here’s where you can find P. S. Bartlett:

Author Blog: https://psbartlett.me/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/PSBartlett

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PSBartlett

Amazon: Fireflies 

 

 

Until the next time!


A Step-by-Step Guide for Featuring Quotes in Your Blog Posts

I often use quotes in my posts. Here is some great information from The Write Life on who to properly use quotes. ❤

Make your blog posts stand out! Here’s how to use quotes effectively in your writing.

Source: A Step-by-Step Guide for Featuring Quotes in Your Blog Posts

FREE Creative Writing Course

I stumbled upon this site and had to share it. I will be taking this free course. I hope you’ll join me. ❤

Free online creative writing course, covering releasing your creativity, how to write a short story, writing from a point of view, bringing your writing to life, characterisation, writing dialogue, poetry, and markets, competitions and other outlets for your writing.

Source: Creative Writing Course

Tanka on haiku – questioning the rules of beauty

Sue shares her thoughts on writing the Japanese poetry forms. I stand corrected – she brings up excellent points about diction and pronunciation in British English vs. American English. I accept that some poets write in their native language which is then translated into English. The syllable count may be off because of the differences in language. I have no problems with this. The poetry challenge was started to share our love of poetry while learning about the different forms. Please write your poetry with your particular syllable count as close to the 5/7/5 format as possible. If you are not spot on, don’t worry. Creativity should be allowed to flourish. That works for me. Thank you, Sue, for sharing your thoughts. ❤

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

There are many set forms of poetic structure. Books and websites abound, setting out the rules of form and content that allow us to label our work and provide a framework in which to explore a concent. The very stringency of these forms, where rhyme schemes, syllable counts and even content are dictated give us a measure against which we can be judged, and many will judge on the slightest deviance from the accepted norm.

I enjoy writing haiku. The ‘midnight haiku’ I started publishing a couple of years ago now have become a staple feature of the blog and I think I have missed no more than a couple of days in that time to illness. I like the constraints imposed by the widely accepted ‘English form’ of the poem; seventeen syllables in a 5-7-5 pattern leave no room for extraneous thoughts, but give plenty of space to explore…

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Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 33 – CLEAN & SHARP

Happy POETRY Tuesday everyone!
Are you ready to get groovy with your poetry? Then, you’re in the right place! Pull up a chair, and let’s write some poetry.

All hyper-links are in purple.

Image credit: Pinterest – Famous Poetry Quotes

You can write your poem in one of the three forms defined below:

HAIKU in English

TANKA

HAIBUN

You can do one poem or try to do one of each. It’s up to you – YOUR CHOICE. The instructions follow below:

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIKU in ENGLISH POETRY FORM

The haiku is a Japanese verse in three lines. Line one has 5 syllables, line 2 has 7 syllables, and line three has 5 syllables. Haiku is a mood poem, and it doesn’t use any metaphors or similes. 5/7/5. Read my post on How to Write a Haiku in English.

Wikipedia explains:

“”Haiku” is a term sometimes loosely applied to any short, impressionistic poem, but there are certain characteristics that are commonly associated with the genre:

  • a focus on some aspect of nature or the seasons[1][2]
  • division into two asymmetrical sections, usually with a cut at the end of the first or second section, creating a juxtaposition of two subjects (e.g. something large and something small, something natural and something human-made, two unexpectedly similar things, etc.)
  • a contemplative or wistful tone and an impressionistic brevity[3][4][5]
  • elliptical “telegram style” syntax and no superfluous words
  • imagery predominates over ideas and statements, so that meaning is typically suggestive, requiring reader participation
  • avoidance of metaphor and similes
  • non-rhyming lines

Some additional traits are especially associated with English-language haiku (as opposed to Japanese-language haiku):

  • A three-line format with 17 syllables arranged in a 5–7–5 pattern;[2][a][6][7][8] or about 10 to 14 syllables,[9][10] which more nearly approximates the duration of a Japanese haiku[11] with the second line usually the longest. Some poets want their haiku to be expressed in one breath[12][13][14]
  • little or no punctuation or capitalization, except that cuts, are sometimes marked with dashes or ellipses, and proper nouns are usually capitalized.”

HOW TO CREATE THE TANKA POETRY FORM

Tanka poems are based on syllable structure much the same way a Haiku is written in the 5/7/5 format.

The Tanka form is easy to create: 5/7/5/7/7 and is a Haiku with two extra lines, of 7 syllables each consisting of five separate lines.

What makes a Tanka different from a Haiku is that the first three lines (5/7/5) are the upper phase. This upper stage is where you create an image in your reader’s mind.

The last two lines (7/7) of a Tanka poem are called the lower phase. Now here is where it gets interesting. The lower stage, the final two lines, should express the poet’s ideas about the image that was created in the three lines above.

Visit Jean Emrich at tankaonline.com Quick Start Guide
CLICK THE LINK TO SEE THE EXAMPLES and to learn how to write a Tanka poem

HOW TO CREATE THE HAIBUN POETRY FORM

NatureWriting.com shares how to write a Haibun poem. Please follow the rules carefully.

Writing Haibun

“The rules for constructing a haibun are simple.

  • Every haibun must begin with a title.
  • Haibun prose is composed of terse, descriptive paragraphs, written in the
    first person singular.
  • The text unfolds in the present moment, as though the experience is occurring now rather than yesterday or some time ago. In keeping with the simplicity of the accompanying haiku or tanka poem, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing must ever be overstated.
  • The poetry never attempts to repeat, quote or explain the prose.
  • Instead, the poetry reflects some aspect of the prose by introducing a different step in the narrative through a microburst of detail.
  • Thus the poetry is a sort of juxtaposition – seemingly different yet somehow connected.

It is the discovery of this link between the prose and the poetry that offers one of the great delights of the haibun form. The subtle twist provided by an elegantly envisaged link, adds much pleasure to our reading and listening.

Some Common Forms of Modern Haibun

1. The basic unit of composition– one paragraph and one poem

Idyll
We guide our canoe along the shores of beautiful Lake Esquagama. It is nine o’clock at night on this evening of the summer solstice. As the sun begins to dim the lake becomes still as glass. Along the shore, forests of birch are reflected in its mirrored surface, their ghostly white trunks disappearing into a green canopy. The only sound is a splash when our bow slices the water. We stop to rest the paddles across our knees, enjoying the peace. Small droplets from our wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Moving on, closer to the fading shore, we savour these moments.

quiet
as a feather
on the breeze
the distant call
of a loon

2. The prose envelope – prose, then poem, then prose

Echoes of Autumn
I walk quietly in the late afternoon chill, birdsong silent, foliage deepened into shade, a rim of orange over darkening hills.

through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Reaching the gate then crossing the threshold I breathe the scent of slow-cooking, the last embers of a fire, red wine poured into gleaming crystal, the table – set for two …

3. Poem then prose

(Rather than begin with a single tanka, I wrote a tanka set or sequence, followed by the prose. In contemporary haibun writing, the poems are occasionally presented in couplets or in longer groups).

The Road to Longreach
the coastal fringe
of green and blue
disappears
behind the gateway
to the outback

wheat, sorghum
and cotton stubble
glistens
in the autumn sun
as hawks patrol above

sunflowers
faces to the sky
the last blaze of colour
in the dryland’s
barren outlook

brown soil
of the rural strip
surrenders to
brick red, burnt ochre
of the open range

beyond
and further out –
in orange dust
a single cornstalk
displays its tassel

Days pass as we move through the desolate landscape, carved into two parts by the road we travel on, a continual ribbon drawing us straight ahead into its vanishing point, where only spinifex grass and saltbush lies between us and our destination.

4. The verse envelope — poem, prose, then poem

Winter Magic
silver light
thick hoar-frost
covers the window

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them. Lost in its beauty, I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway.
Mother’s voice interrupts, “Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!”

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

5. Alternating prose and verse elements

The Sentinel
I climb round and round close to the outside wall, to avoid the railing where the stair treads narrow about their central post. A semi-circular platform rests high above. Its glass windows provide a sweeping view. Counting the last few steps, I finally reach the top of the Moreton Bay Lighthouse, where I gaze in awe at the ocean below.

the rising sun
an endless pathway
of molten gold

Outside the lighthouse, lamp is rotating. I disengage it as there is no need for its warning light. Now the bold red and white stripes of the lighthouse itself will become the beacon. I study the turbulence of the deep waters churning the rocky shore below. The subtle changes in the wind, waves, and tides are entered in my log book – these brief markers of the ever-transforming seascape that surrounds me.

ebb tide
a foot print shelters
one tiny crab”

Here are some great sites that will help you write your poetry and count syllables.

thesaurus.com

For Synonyms and Antonyms. When your word has too many syllables, find one that works.

howmanysyllables.com

Find out how many syllables each word has. I use this site for all my Haiku and Tanka poems. Click on the “Poetry Workshop” tab to create your Haiku or Tanka.

THE RULES

I will publish the Tuesday prompt post at 12: 03 A.M. Mountain Standard Time (Denver
Time). 
That should give everyone time to see the prompt from around the world.

WRITE YOUR POEM ON YOUR BLOG as a post.

How Long Do You Have and Your Deadline: You have a week to complete the Challenge with a deadline of Monday at 12:00 P.M. (Noon)
Denver time, U. S. A. This will give me a chance to add the links from everyone’s poem post from the previous week, on the new prompt I send out on Tuesday. I urge everyone to visit the blogs and comment on everyone’s poem.

The rules are simple.

I will give you two words that you need to use (in some form) in the writing of your poetry. This will be a challenge in writing your Haibun poem. Follow the rules carefully.

The two words can be used in any way you would like to use them. Words have different definitions, and you can use the definitions you like. Feel free to use synonyms for the words when the poetry form calls for it.

LINK YOUR BLOG POST TO MINE WITH A PINGBACK. To do a Pingback: Copy the URL (the HTTP:// address of my post) for the current week’s Challenge and paste it into your post. You may also place a copy of your URL of your post in the comments of the current week’s Challenge post.

Because of the time difference between where you are, and I am, you might not think your link is there. I manually approve all links. People participating in the challenge may visit you and comment or “like” your post. I also need at least a Pingback or a link in the comments section to know you took part and to include you in the Weekly Review section of the new prompt on Tuesday.

BE CREATIVE. Use your photos and create “Visual POETRY” if you wish, although it is not necessary. Use whatever program you want to make your images.

As time permits, I will visit your blog, comment, and TWEET your POETRY

If you add these hashtags to your post TITLE (depending on which poetry form you use) your poetry may be viewed more often:

#Haiku, #Tanka, #micropoetry, #poetry, #5lines, #Haibun, #Prose

If you haven’t set up your blog to share to Twitter, you should. Click Publicize to learn how to link your blog to Twitter. It is an excellent way to meet other poets and share your work. Learn how to do a PINNED TWEET.

You may copy the badge I have created to go with the Weekly Poetry Challenge Post and place it in your post:

HERE’S WHO JOINED US LAST WEEK FOR OUR 30th POETRY CHALLENGE USING THE WORDS – LEAD & SAVE: (Please make sure to visit the other participants. We learn from each other. <3)

Alleys of love – Playing with words

Learn fishing – Reena Saxena

 Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 32 – LEAD & SAVE – Ladyleemanila

 Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge 32 – LEAD & SAVE – Mick E Talbot Poems

 #Haiku# Poetry Challenge # lead & save # 32 – சுழல்கள்/Suzhalgal

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge # 32 – LEAD & SAVE | K Y R O S M A G I C A

Spring poplars – Jane Dougherty Writes

COLLEEN’S WEEKLY #POETRY CHALLENGE # 32 – LEAD & SAVE/Two on a Rant

 The Psychopath – Reena Saxena

The Soul’s Cry – Reena Saxena

Lead & Save | The Syllabub Sea

Out of the Darkness (a Tanka) | Darkness of His Dreams

 Haiku #11 – Stories

Colleen’s Weekly Poetry Challenge #32 Lead & Save/Annette Rochelle Aben

May the Fourth (be with you) | method two madness

 Sunburst | rivrvlogr

Colleen’s Weekly #Poetry Challenge #32 Lead & Save

Naiad | Yesterday and today: Merril’s historical musings

Lead and Save – My Feelings My Freedom

Thoughts of Words

“Dreams,” a Haiku – Colleen Chesebro ~ Fairy Whisperer

 Spring Symphony | thoughts and entanglements

This week’s Poet of the Week is Hecblogger from his blog called, Playing With Words. This young man writes some fabulous love poetry, and this Haiku was outstanding. Here’s what I love about his words:

  1. No punctuation. What that means to me (it might mean something different to you) is that this Haiku is a stream of consciousness poem. The words poured out of the poet as he wrestled with his feelings about the object of his affection.
  2. These few words tell you everything you need to know about this relationship… the poet is smitten. Short, sweet, and to the point. I love it!

Alleys of Love

her eyes lead me on
treacherous alleys of love
who can save me now

© 2017 Playing with Words

Here are the two words for this week’s challenge: CLEAN & SHARP

(any forms of the words AND don’t forget to use synonyms of the words I gave you)

There are many different meanings to these words. Have fun and experiment. If the prompt words don’t Inspire you… write a POEM based on the photo BELOW:

Image credit: Pixabay.com

POETRY TUESDAY! JOIN IN AND GET YOUR POETRY ON!

050417_2045_DreamsaHai5.jpg

Meet Eleionomae, the Fairy Nymph from The Heart Stone Chronicles: The Swamp Fairy

I visited Kev’s Books & Music today. The swamp fairy stopped by for an interview. 🦋🌈❤️

KC BOOKS & MUSIC

2016-07-15 14.48.40

Book Cover Design by Bookxeedo Book Covers

Hi, everyone. I would like to give many thanks to Kevin of KC Books & Music for his kind invitation to visit his blog. It is much appreciated and a great honor.

For those of you who do not know me, my name is Colleen Chesebro. I am a writer, a poet, and a fairy whisperer…

Yes, I bet a few of you are scratching your head wondering what I’m talking about – a fairy whisperer? Let me tell you the story of the greatest experience I have ever had.

While on a walk during a warm, foggy morning in November 2014, I had a close encounter of the fairy kind. At the time, we were living in Pensacola, Florida. I still remember the day, as if it has been carved into my memory; something I will never forget.

2014-11-04 07.31.36

The road I took…

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SUBMISSIONS – Into The Void Magazine

Looking for somewhere to submit that great poetry or short story? Look no further. Click the link below to see my great find. ❤

Currently accepting submissions to Issue 5 until June 13th. Categories may close early as they fill up. **Our monthly Submittable-allotted free submissions limit has been reached for this month, but free submissions will re-open again on June 1st. You may still submit via the Tip Jar for a within-a-week response.**

Source: SUBMISSIONS – Into The Void Magazine